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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I currently have an outdoor 14-50 outlet on a 50amp circuit with a GFI breaker. I don't have an EVSE yet, but I'm looking into 40 A versions. However, every manual I read suggests installing the EVSE on a non-gfi circuit, or explicitly states "Do not provide any additional GFCI protection upstream of the charging unit. ".

I'm not clear whether they are saying I don't NEED to provide additional protection, or if they are saying I should not have a GFI breaker because the EVSE will trip it during normal operation.
 

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240v 50 amp breakers that are installed in a home do not normally have GFIC. I have no idea why you have one. But if it trips during use of your EVSE, you can replace it with a normal 240v 50 amp for about $10.
I have a normal 240v 40 amp service with my 32 amp EVSE so I have no way to determine if there would be a negative interaction between the EVSE and the GFCI. The EVSE has built in GFCI capability.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, it's outdoors. Was originally installed for a hard-wired hot tub and it has been repurposed for a 14-50 outdoor outlet.
 

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My EVSE is on a 50A GFI breaker and has been working fine for almost 5 months.
Since someone may ask, the reason is because I already had the breaker, it was used for an outside outlet. Figured I might as well use it when I put in the new circuit for the EVSE.
 

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I currently have an outdoor 14-50 outlet on a 50amp circuit with a GFI breaker. I don't have an EVSE yet, but I'm looking into 40 A versions. However, every manual I read suggests installing the EVSE on a non-gfi circuit, or explicitly states "Do not provide any additional GFCI protection upstream of the charging unit. ".

I'm not clear whether they are saying I don't NEED to provide additional protection, or if they are saying I should not have a GFI breaker because the EVSE will trip it during normal operation.
2017 NEC (Article 625) requires a GFCI breaker on receptacle circuits up to 50A. I also saw an installation document from Chargepoint recommending no additional GFCI, but it was dated 2015.
 

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2017 NEC (Article 625) requires a GFCI breaker on receptacle circuits up to 50A. I also saw an installation document from Chargepoint recommending no additional GFCI, but it was dated 2015.
My newly installed NEMA 14-50 receptacle in my garage is not GFI. I got a permit, self installed, and the city inspected and approved it, no problem. Perhaps it is best to check with your city.

GFI was rumored to trip if connected to EVSE. However, when I tried my OEM EVSE on existing GFI 120V outlet, it charged fine.

Just my experience on the matter.
 

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My newly installed NEMA 14-50 receptacle in my garage is not GFI. I got a permit, self installed, and the city inspected and approved it, no problem. Perhaps it is best to check with your city.

GFI was rumored to trip if connected to EVSE. However, when I tried my OEM EVSE on existing GFI 120V outlet, it charged fine.

Just my experience on the matter.
There are a handful of states that have not adopted the 2017 code, and even a few that are governed by local code only. Your local inspector is the final arbiter of what is legal at your location. For the purposes of article 625, NEMA 14-50 receptacles can also be interpreted as not EVSE specific.
 

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There is an earlier writeup of why GFCI behind an EVSE can be spoofed to cause an unintended trip. GFCI tripping with stock charger

The root cause appears to be high frequency from vehicle inverters feeding back to the GFCI, inducing a leakage current on the ground line, and thereby tripping the GFCI.

This is a random effect that is highly dependent on the entire chain, from power panel to EV.

This happens frequently with RVs as well as dockside power connections. When My RV Is Plugged Into a GFCI Outlet The Power Converter Is Tripping The GFCI
 

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My 60A circuit for my ClipperCreek HCS-60 does not have a GFCI. The 15A circuit for the L1 charger does. Both are outside, mounted on the same pole, by the same electrician, at the same time, and inspected by the city electrical inspector.
 

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Just had a outdoor install beginning of Jan. It is a GFI breaker. It is a JuiceBox Pro 40 and the 14-50 outlet is on the outside wall of the building. I am fairly certain that electrical code requires the GFI breaker when your installing it outdoors regardless if the equipment plugging into it has the capability. You should check with the folks who handle permits/inspections to verify.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Just had a outdoor install beginning of Jan. It is a GFI breaker. It is a JuiceBox Pro 40 and the 14-50 outlet is on the outside wall of the building. I am fairly certain that electrical code requires the GFI breaker when your installing it outdoors regardless if the equipment plugging into it has the capability. You should check with the folks who handle permits/inspections to verify.
I would think so as well. And regardless of what regulations say, I would personally still want a GFI breaker on any outdoor outlet, especially the 14-50... I really hope I don't have to switch the breaker out.
 

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I would think so as well. And regardless of what regulations say, I would personally still want a GFI breaker on any outdoor outlet, especially the 14-50... I really hope I don't have to switch the breaker out.
I just read the 2020 NEC sec. 625 and GFCI protection is required on all plug- in EVSEs, not just outdoor receptacles. Hardwired does not. since 99% of EVSE will be in garages or outdoors, this kinda makes sense. Also I did not know this and need to correct, no locking plugs allowed. I have an L6-30 that needs to go bye-bye. From what I also understand the GFCI in a breaker has a stray current trip of around 5ma and the wall or portable station's internal GFCI is around 20ma so the breaker rules. Don't forget the 30% EVSE tax credit when you order that $125 50 amp GFCI!
 

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Was that changed in the 2020? Is that for 150V or less?
Nothing I remember was struck out with a line through it so I assume it is the same as 2017. I’m pretty sure it includes all levels of charging up to 1000 VDC, but I can check. It did mention all charging stations must be above flood levels. Good luck with that. I would post the whole code but NFPA is read only
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You need to check your own state to see what version of the NEC they have adopted. It is always possible that a municipality adopts a different version than the state but that is unheard of.
California just adopted NEC 2017 in January of 2020. They adopted NEC 2008 in 2011.
As of February 1, 2020, the 2020 NEC is in effect in one state, the 2017 NEC is in effect in 31 states, the 2014 NEC is in effect in 11 states, the 2011 NEC is in effect in one state, and the 2008 NEC is in effect in three states. If you are in California, where more than half of all (North American) EV's are, focus on the 2017 from a legal code standpoint.
Of course, you can always do better. I did with my installation by actually following the 75 degree C wiring amperage limit (not 90) AND I always used a wire gauge two better than I needed.
 

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The requirement for GFCI protection for plug-in portable or permanent EVSEs started in the 2017 NEC. Any installation approved before that or in states still on older code cycles are exempt or grandfathered. It appears as if the maximum amperage for a EVSE receptacle is 50 amps. Any higher needs to be hardwired and no GFCI is required. The cords on said EVSE can be no longer than one foot, probably so you can disconnect it easily. The newest code defines the EVSE as the entire system, from the breaker to the coupling at the car.
As mentioned, the code is the minimum requirement, you can always do more protection.
 
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