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I apologize for my adding confusion. When the auto cruise control is set, the distance can be input for following time. Cruise control reduces the pedalling.
 

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But then, people are sometimes overwhelmed with too many choices.:oops:
I'm often overwhelmed with choice, which is why I take 8 years to pick my next vehicle...

VW saw it fit to include 5 levels of regen all using the gear selector. The strongest regen is like a lite version of L mode, and the weakest is true coast.
 

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This got me interested, so I did some searching.
Found this from 4-2020: The 2020 Chevrolet Bolt EV is solid but lacks advanced features

Other than that, the compact BEV is pretty much as we knew it at launch. It still has the same 200hp (150kW), 366lb-ft (360Nm) permanent magnet synchronous motor driving the front wheels. It still only DC fast-charges at 55kW, adding 100 miles of range in 30 minutes, although software tweaks mean it should charge more rapidly than before in cold temperatures).
And it still doesn't offer adaptive cruise control or the excellent Super Cruise driver assist.

Diode, keep us posted....
 

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figured that when I have my heart attack while driving, I'll stop faster in my bolt lol
I never thought about that, but you're right - in "L" mode the Bolt has a deadman's pedal!

Exactly right, foot off the accelerator should mean just that, coasting. Mimicking the unintended consequences of an automatic transmission (why automatic rather than manual, btw?)...
Deceleration without accelerator pedal input is even stronger with a manual transmission, at least in the cars that I've driven.

Right now we are given 3 Levels of regen...
Those 3 Levels are D, L and N.
You can't use "N" as a driving mode because in that mode the gearbox oil pump doesn't run. If you leave the car in "N" for very long you are asking for trouble.
 

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But then, people are sometimes overwhelmed with too many choices.:oops:

Right now we are given 3 Levels of regen, not counting the Variable Regen the Brake Pedal gives you, right up the max there is BEFORE the friction brakes begin working.
That's what's so great about Blended Brakes! (which as said, is a tech Tesla does not have.)
Those 3 Levels are D, L and N.

There are no efficiency or performance differences between any of them because YOU are the one controlling the accel and decel amounts of the car.
N does have the advantage of '0 kW Regen' without working the go pedal and watching the display.
True coasting is an efficiency booster.
Regen is not 100% efficient, but when you have to slow down, it is better than making brake heat anyday !
I was wrong before about admitting that Tesla does not have blended brakes. They may not have the kind of blended brakes you've defined it to be but based on this document (and others), they would technically be described as blended brakes. Also, One Pedal driving in a Tesla is still optional.

This is from Max Boerbooms Masters Thesis 2012:

"An important feature of hybrid drive trains is the capability to recover the kinetic energy of the bodies translating mass that is otherwise dissipated as heat by the friction brakes. Such a system is called a regenerative brake system (RBS). The majority of current hybrid electric vehicles operate the traction motor as a generator, providing a brake torque to the wheels. The energy recovery takes place by transforming this torque into electrical energy via the generator that stores it in an energy storage system (e.g. battery). Brake energy recovery is limited by two factors. The first is the state of charge (SOC) of the energy storage system. When the SOC is at an upper charge limit, the RBS does not allow further recuperation. Second is the insufficient amount of brake torque, provided by the generator, to reach high vehicle decelerations. Therefore the RBS has to be merged with a friction brake system. As the name may presume ‘electric vehicle blended braking’ combines (or blends) two brake systems; a regenerative brake system with a friction brake system."

There are other articles that support Max's definition.

This one pertains to trains where the term originated.

"Dynamic braking alone is not enough to stop a locomotive, as its braking effect rapidly diminishes below about 10 to 12 miles per hour (16 to 19 km/h). Therefore, it is always used in conjunction with the regular air brake. This combined system is called blended braking. Li-ion batteries have also been used to store energy for use in bringing trains to a complete halt.[1] "

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You may just want to redefine what the Bolt's blended braking system is doing as a derivative of Blended Braking just so you can differentiate between the two. The term Blended Braking is maybe a bit generic for what you're looking for.
 

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...You can't use "N" as a driving mode because in that mode the gearbox oil pump doesn't run. If you leave the car in "N" for very long you are asking for trouble.
Whoa, I did not know this. How is the known?
Do you see an 'Oil Pump RPM' display in TorquePro?
Maybe with speed and in N the pump continues to run....
Is it stated in the owner's manual?

If true, you should never use N while in motion.
Although it is a great way to clean and warm up the discs once in a while!
Why is it even a selection available to the driver?

Maybe I should RTFM.....
 

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Whoa, I did not know this. How is the known?
Do you see an 'Oil Pump RPM' display in TorquePro?
Maybe with speed and in N the pump continues to run....
Is it stated in the owner's manual?

If true, you should never use N while in motion.
Although it is a great way to clean and warm up the discs once in a while!
Why is it even a selection available to the driver?

Maybe I should RTFM.....
It was stated in a Weber tear-down. Possibly this one:

 

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2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV Premier w/ driver confidence 2 and infotainment packages in Silver Mist
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I did find out how the voltec system worked on the Volt, with electrically operated clutches between the traction motor and the transaxle, and also between the ICE range extender and the traction motor.

I m too impatient to watch a half hour YouTube so does the traction motor on the Bolt also have an electric clutch to disengage from the transaxle or is it a hard connection?
 

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I did find out how the voltec system worked on the Volt, with electrically operated clutches between the traction motor and the transaxle, and also between the ICE range extender and the traction motor.

I m too impatient to watch a half hour YouTube so does the traction motor on the Bolt also have an electric clutch to disengage from the transaxle or is it a hard connection?
Hard connection. That just means the rotor freewheels with the rest of the drive train when coasting.
 

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I find it annoying, too.
I wish they had say 3 settings for D - no regen, half, and 100% (meaning the way it is now).
EVs have this great function of coasting because they have very little friction from gearing.

I had 2014 FIAT 500e. By default it had some regen built in, but it was coasting much easier. In Bolt I feel like I am slowing down way too much.


Any idea if some aftermarket programming actually could do it?
What is funny, the regen is speed dependent, where at high speeds, meaning about 60 mph or so, the regen is very little unless you start braking or use L or pull the paddle. I guess this is safety feature not to send car off the road :)

I coasted in N several times. It is so rewarding in a sense of seeing how easily the car rolls.

My personal take would be - let it roll, coast as much as it can, regen is on demand only, with option of L for one pedal likers (no offense here).
I push the brake and it is purely regen, up to whatever max regen I can get. Even more, I would add an indicator on the dash informing you that you are in green zone where regen is only active and orange when the friction brakes are being activated.
 
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It was stated in a Weber tear-down. Possibly this one:
Can't watch this now, but those are open bearings and obviously the gears are spinning in the oil.
Where does this 'pressure' get pumped to?
Could it be that the oil pump just moves the ATF through the oil cooler, when needed?
 

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Whoa, I did not know this. How is the known?
Do you see an 'Oil Pump RPM' display in TorquePro?
Maybe with speed and in N the pump continues to run....
Is it stated in the owner's manual?

If true, you should never use N while in motion.
Although it is a great way to clean and warm up the discs once in a while!
Why is it even a selection available to the driver?

Maybe I should RTFM.....
It is in the manual. N is useful in car washes, etc. This allows the tires to move while the wash moves the vehicle.
 

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Can't watch this now, but those are open bearings and obviously the gears are spinning in the oil.
Where does this 'pressure' get pumped to?
Could it be that the oil pump just moves the ATF through the oil cooler, when needed?
The 12V pump moves the ATF up to an oil sump on top of the drive unit where it flows by gravity to be distributed in channels to the rotor and bearings. The actual quote about when the pump is operational is in the video at 9:54. This link starts the video at that point:


The owner's manual has no warning about damaging the drive unit by coasting in Neutral.
Rather it just says not to coast in Neutral because of losing regen's efficiency (p. 30) and due to possibly overheating the friction brakes (p. 196).
 

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This is definitely something I'll be looking out for in the future. I also will make a point to rent a car out on turo before buying in the future.

I had not realized this was an issue until I noticed how on the highway it would Regen 1/3 of the energy I had just expended in accelerating. So insanely stupid and uncomfortable.

It isn't about the efficiency versus. It is about driver comfort. Having to feather the accelerator is annoying and fatiguing over time. I can still feel the ache two days later. I've driven longer periods in my cmax and didn't have this ache. I would estimate that with the bolt Regen profile you have to press on the accelerator 5x more than other cars.

This more than the seats is uncomfortable while driving. I thought the seats were acceptable and that I could get used to them. I cannot get used to the Regen.

It even forces me to accelerate while going downhill just to maintain speed.

I can't believe this is a problem. I had wanted for years to get this car and now I finally can and I run into this.
Set it on cruise control going downhill.. it will maintain speed and regen automatically!
 

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I apologize for my adding confusion. When the auto cruise control is set, the distance can be input for following time. Cruise control reduces the pedaling.
I am mistaken about auto cruise control. The distance is only to give you a change in the icon, doesn't do much other than that.
 
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