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I have no idea. What about it? Does it work at all? Or maybe - Gasp - maybe it could even work on the Bolt display?

No, no, I guess that would be too much to hope for from GM.
 

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That website was setup some 2+ years ago to promote the Bolt. It’s a marketing site, not a technical site. What likely happened is that the third-party data provider changed their API and Chevy hasn’t noticed or bothered to update the website to fix the problem.

The myChevrolet app has an accurate list of charging stations, and I know CarPlay/Maps easily lists them.
 

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What about the my chevrolet app on your smart phone?
The mychevy app is useless for trip planning. Evtripplanner is much better, and PlugShare has a better database of chargestations than mychevy ever thought about. Mychevy seems to be a marketing tool to show potential customers how many chargers on the map with cute range circles.
 

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What is the source for the charger network on the MyChevrolet app? My business has a public level 2 charger. We've put it on the PlugShare app. How do we get it on MyChevrolet app?
 

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The mychevy app is useless for trip planning. Evtripplanner is much better, and PlugShare has a better database of chargestations than mychevy ever thought about. Mychevy seems to be a marketing tool to show potential customers how many chargers on the map with cute range circles.
The interface of the mychevy app isn't the best, but it has one of the more accurate models for the car's energy usage over a given route, and has good suggestions about how much/how long to charge the car at each stop. Evtripplanner doesn't even seem to have a model for the Bolt (GreenRace, which some others like, does).

Also, many folk rave about PlugShare but it is pretty useless for real trip planning. In particular, it doesn't know the charge rate of most DC fast chargers, so you may see what looks like a great place to charge only to discover that it is a craptastic 25 kW charger.

My current feeling is that for best results, you have to do a lot of tedious mix-and-match work between sites to do route planning. If you're okay with imperfect results using a single tool, the myChevrolet app is fine.
 

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The interface of the mychevy app isn't the best, but it has one of the more accurate models for the car's energy usage over a given route, and has good suggestions about how much/how long to charge the car at each stop. Evtripplanner doesn't even seem to have a model for the Bolt (GreenRace, which some others like, does).

Also, many folk rave about PlugShare but it is pretty useless for real trip planning. In particular, it doesn't know the charge rate of most DC fast chargers, so you may see what looks like a great place to charge only to discover that it is a craptastic 25 kW charger.

My current feeling is that for best results, you have to do a lot of tedious mix-and-match work between sites to do route planning. If you're okay with imperfect results using a single tool, the myChevrolet app is fine.
I was one of those people that GM interviewed WRT the Bolt a few months ago. Three times in fact. This the primary point I made - trip planning, even if DCFCs are available, is extremely tedious. It's also uncertain as most of the information is crowd sourced and the crowd isn't big enough. To make road trips mundane, if still perhaps slower than in an ICE, we need not only DCFCs but reliable information about them and a tool that combines charger location, predicted speed and weather to give an optimal charging plan. The folks I talked to seemed to "get" this ard where trying to kick it upstairs.
 

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...we need not only DCFCs but reliable information about them and a tool that combines charger location, predicted speed and weather to give an optimal charging plan.
I have to throw in my possibly unwanted 2 cents here. This path really isn't going to help the cause for more widespread adoption IMHO. The solution is to have enough DCFC ultra fast charging stations spread around so that such planning is unnecessary. ICE drivers have absolutely no thought about refueling beyond either "I'm at a quarter tank." or "The light is on.". So whatever comes along in the ultra fast charging world had better be as simple as those interfaces for the average driver.

There is a reason that there are multiple gas stations at virtually every exit of every interstate.

ga2500ev
 

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...we need not only DCFCs but reliable information about them and a tool that combines charger location, predicted speed and weather to give an optimal charging plan.
I have to throw in my possibly unwanted 2 cents here. This path really isn't going to help the cause for more widespread adoption IMHO. The solution is to have enough DCFC ultra fast charging stations spread around so that such planning is unnecessary. ICE drivers have absolutely no thought about refueling beyond either "I'm at a quarter tank." or "The light is on.". So whatever comes along in the ultra fast charging world had better be as simple as those interfaces for the average driver.

There is a reason that there are multiple gas stations at virtually every exit of every interstate.

ga2500ev
I agree because ive driven only 2 road trips and thats enough to realize that at least a 25KW fast charger located every 200 miles is the only realistic answer unless You're retired. My logic? At a reasonable highway speed 65-75 mph the dash shows 15-25kw of useage. 25kw will at least allow a driver to be on the road 50% of the time. A level 2 means Youre spending approximately 3 hours charging for every 1 hour driving! YOU'D BETTER NOT BE IN A HURRY...
 

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I agree because ive driven only 2 road trips and thats enough to realize that at least a 25KW fast charger located every 200 miles is the only realistic answer unless You're retired. My logic? At a reasonable highway speed 65-75 mph the dash shows 15-25kw of useage. 25kw will at least allow a driver to be on the road 50% of the time. A level 2 means Youre spending approximately 3 hours charging for every 1 hour driving! YOU'D BETTER NOT BE IN A HURRY...
Davioh,

I agree that we need more DCFC chargers. However, 25 kW doesn't really scratch the surface of the speeds needed for long distance travel. I believe that the public charging system should have three levels. Two of them are being implemented:

1. Public L2 chargers. These are used in long term parking situations.
2. DCFC Travel chargers. These are used in road trip situations.

Your comment seems to be referring to these travel chargers. 25 kW will not work for this task as they are way too slow. Electrify America's upcoming DCFC travel charging network consists of 150 and 350 kW chargers. Speed is crucial for these chargers as people on a road trip generally want to be parked for as little time as necessary to get power to move on.

I believe the third leg of the needed public charging infrastructure is DCFC opportunity charging. This is the type of charge one does when one parked for a limited amount of time during the normal course of the day. L2 chargers cannot fit the role because as you point out they are too slow when a vehicle is going to be parked for 20-30 minutes. OTOH travel chargers cost too much to deploy and are overblown for picking up some charge while shopping or stopping to eat. A 20-25 kW DCFC charger would fit perfectly in this role. 10-12 kWh of power in a half hour is a hefty chunk, and the electrical infrastructure to deliver that amount of power costs little more that L2 stations that are currently deployed. Also, switching to DCFC facilitates delivering the maximum power of the charger instead of depending on the internal charger of the car, which is generally limited to 7.2 kW and lower and is specifically designed to charge the battery of the car in a period of 6-12 hours.

We need more travel chargers. They need to be fast. There needs to be a lot of them. They need to be close together (like 75-100 miles apart) along every interstate.

But those are not the only chargers that I think we need.

ga2500ev
 

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I'm not sure what the point here is. So far, only Tesla offers native integration of charger locations in their interface, and the only reason they did that so easily is because they also own the chargers.

Eventually, a program like PlugShare will be able to port directly to Apple Car Play or Android Auto, but for now, you still have to manually load the maps.
 

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I agree because ive driven only 2 road trips and thats enough to realize that at least a 25KW fast charger located every 200 miles is the only realistic answer unless You're retired. My logic? At a reasonable highway speed 65-75 mph the dash shows 15-25kw of useage. 25kw will at least allow a driver to be on the road 50% of the time. A level 2 means Youre spending approximately 3 hours charging for every 1 hour driving! YOU'D BETTER NOT BE IN A HURRY...
Davioh,

I agree that we need more DCFC chargers. However, 25 kW doesn't really scratch the surface of the speeds needed for long distance travel. I believe that the public charging system should have three levels. Two of them are being implemented:

1. Public L2 chargers. These are used in long term parking situations.
2. DCFC Travel chargers. These are used in road trip situations.

You comment seems to be referring to these travel chargers. 25 kW will not work for this task as they are way too slow. Electrify America's upcoming DCFC travel charging network consists of 150 and 350 kW chargers. Speed is crucial for these chargers as people on a road trip generally want to be parked for as little time as necessary to get power to move on.

I believe the third leg of the needed public charging infrastructure is DCFC opportunity charging. This is the type of charge one does when one parked for a limited amount of time during the normal course of the day. L2 chargers cannot fit the role because as you point out they are too slow when a vehicle is going to be parked for 20-30 minutes. OTOH travel chargers cost too much to deploy and are overblown for picking up some charge while shopping or stopping to eat. A 20-25 kW DCFC charger would fit perfectly in this role. 10-12 kWh of power in a half hour is a hefty chunk, and the electrical infrastructure to deliver that amount of power costs little more that L2 stations that are currently deployed. Also, switching to DCFC facilitates delivering the maximum power of the charger instead of depending on the internal charger of the car, which is generally limited to 7.2 kW and lower and is specifically designed to charge the battery of the car in a period of 6-12 hours.

We need more travel chargers. They need to be fast. There needs to be a lot of them. They need to be close together (like 75-100 miles apart) along every interstate.

But those are not the only chargers that I think we need.

ga2500ev
Hi ga2500ev- yes in an ideal world for EV drivers there would be several 350kw DCFC at every single gas station across the entire country. No more need to check around on apps or worry the 1 single charger in the town is broken or iced. Also ideally our cars would have 200kwh solid state batteries resulting in 700+ mile range on the highways. No more need to worry about running dangerously low on electrons before the next stop.

The point of my comment was that in 2018 there is a real dearth of any kind of charging making a highway road trip either impossible or highly time consuming. I was pointing out an observation that I was ignorant of before I purchased it; the actual usage is approx 20kw power used on the dash at highway speeds or 3 times that of power delivery at level 2. Level 2 is only good for at home , on the road if You're staying at a hotel overnight or at Your destination. The 1 time I had to use level 2 on a road trip to Dallas it was because that's the only charger there was. I estimate I spent an extra 12 HOURS waiting there and back vs. approx 2 hours DCFC. I emailed evgo and of course the answer is always a generic form letter saying thanks for being a customer and we will look into it.

I salivated at the news dcfc's are going into both Target and Walmarts. I sincerely hope in the future one of them decides it's smart to have 2-3 of the chargers in every store location in the country! It will then be a golden age of EV charging as long as they don't decide to Jack the prcices up to ultra high! As it is I think the prices for dcfc sessions are too high right now and need to come down. That's a whole separate thread!
 

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Hi ga2500ev- yes in an ideal world for EV drivers there would be several 350kw DCFC at every single gas station across the entire country.
Actually there really isn't a need for that. EV charging does not need to, nor should it, follow the gas station refueling model. One cannot easily deliver gasoline to places where cars are parked. OTOH virtually everyone has access to electricity wherever they go.

Travel chargers should be deployed along travel routes. Several studies have shown that while US Interstates comprise 2% of roads in the US, they carry upwards of 25% of total miles driven. Pretty much if travel charging stations cover interstates and other major highways, coupled with other standard methods of charging, there will be enough infrastructure to support long distance EV travel.

No more need to check around on apps or worry the 1 single charger in the town is broken or iced. Also ideally our cars would have 200kwh solid state batteries resulting in 700+ mile range on the highways.
This idea has at least 3 flaws to it. First is costs. Second is required space to carry. Third and probably most important is the simple fact that in the overall scheme, that usage will be minimal. Again studies of typical driving patterns show that daily trips over 100 miles starts in the less than 5% of all trips range. It really just doesn't make sense to carry a 700+ mile range battery for minimal usage.

No more need to worry about running dangerously low on electrons before the next stop.
The point of my comment was that in 2018 there is a real dearth of any kind of charging making a highway road trip either impossible or highly time consuming.
This is true. That infrastructure is coming. It would have been nice if it had been started 5 years ago. But better late than never.

I was pointing out an observation that I was ignorant of before I purchased it; the actual usage is approx 20kw power used on the dash at highway speeds or 3 times that of power delivery at level 2. Level 2 is only good for at home , on the road if You're staying at a hotel overnight or at Your destination.
That is exactly correct. This is what L2 charging is designed for: recharging the battery overnight. It's important because that infrastructure handles the other 95% of trips that I referred to above. It is the baseline for daily usage.

But as you point out, it is completely inappropriate for either travel charging, or opportunity charging situations. The solution however is to install a faster and more widespread charging infrastructure as opposed to stuffing a (literally) ton of bulky, heavy, and expensive batteries that will never be used into a vehicle.

The 1 time I had to use level 2 on a road trip to Dallas it was because that's the only charger there was. I estimate I spent an extra 12 HOURS waiting there and back vs. approx 2 hours DCFC. I emailed evgo and of course the answer is always a generic form letter saying thanks for being a customer and we will look into it.
I salivated at the news dcfc's are going into both Target and Walmarts. I sincerely hope in the future one of them decides it's smart to have 2-3 of the chargers in every store location in the country! It will then be a golden age of EV charging as long as they don't decide to Jack the prcices up to ultra high!
Those are the Electrify America travel chargers. We already know the structure and prices for these:

- 2000 chargers in 500 locations in 34 states
- Mix of 150 and 350 kW chargers at each location
- 4 to 10 stations per location
- Prices are currently $1 to connect and 30 cents a minute to charge.
- Locations targeted to highway exits with shopping and restaurants.

Personally I'd limit that to the golden age of travel chargers. I believe that quite a bit more infrastructure is necessary to cover the other bases.

As it is I think the prices for dcfc sessions are too high right now and need to come down. That's a whole separate thread!
The prices for travel charging is probably OK as long as the cost per mile is comparable to gas. However, that only works as long as the rest of the infrastructure is also in place. Pricing for charging while the car is parked in every other situation needs to be close to the price of the actual electricity charging the car. That's both for private charging at home, and for public around town charging.

ga2500ev
 

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Or, for that occasional trip outside the DCFC network, you could tow a Long Ranger:

http://www.evnut.com/rav_longranger.htm

Many thanks to Darell Dickey for continuing his EVnut site.

Reading these threads is a fun "deja vu" from the old EV-1, RAV4-EV and Ranger EV fora.
 

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As I've pointed out many a time; most of us know someone who owns a non-EV. Why not trade with them for longer trips? Then there is the option to rent a vehicle. There is no sense building a generator and towing it along for the occasional long distance trip when the cheap solution already exists (the right vehicle for the job).

It would be more efficient if the trailer directly drove a wheel on the ground than to convert to electricity that is fed to the car. They call those pusher trailers.
 

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As I've pointed out many a time; most of us know someone who owns a non-EV. Why not trade with them for longer trips? Then there is the option to rent a vehicle. There is no sense building a generator and towing it along for the occasional long distance trip when the cheap solution already exists (the right vehicle for the job).

It would be more efficient if the trailer directly drove a wheel on the ground than to convert to electricity that is fed to the car. They call those pusher trailers.

Agreed. Or for two-vehicle families, drive the PHEV.
 

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I have to throw in my possibly unwanted 2 cents here. This path really isn't going to help the cause for more widespread adoption IMHO. The solution is to have enough DCFC ultra fast charging stations spread around so that such planning is unnecessary. ICE drivers have absolutely no thought about refueling beyond either "I'm at a quarter tank." or "The light is on.". So whatever comes along in the ultra fast charging world had better be as simple as those interfaces for the average driver.

There is a reason that there are multiple gas stations at virtually every exit of every interstate.

ga2500ev
I believe that with the current state of charging technology, meaning it takes a while, opimzation of charging time and location is low hanging fruit on the usability tree. If GM spent a few 100,000 bucks on the app it’s a one time investment that will pay of for years. That sort of money isn’t going to do much for charging infrastructure. Do get me wrong, I’m all for more chargers too.
 
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