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The Volt was the same way. I only know of one vehicle fatality, and that's because a family of four got t-boned by a young BMW driver doing over 120 mph through an intersection. :(
I remember that story! That was a really screwed up situation, the BMW driver had been cited previously for reckless driving but didn't change his attitude or behavior :(

Keith
 

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My Bolt is equipped with a 1000 pound battering ram (or should I say battery ram?). It's not your atypical econobox.
Yup, the mass of your vehicle has a lot to do with survivability. If two cars of equal weight collide, in the worst case situation they both stop at or near the collision site. If a heavy car hits a light car the light car doesn't just stop, it goes backwards from the collision site and the passengers have a much rougher time. The Bolt is as heavy as your average large passenger car, almost a thousand pounds heavier than a "normal" compact car and has a very rigid structure due to the battery pack.

Keith
 

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Just my opinion, but the nice weather in SoCal is not worth the price.
Yeah I hear that. I hear all that. I grew up in Maine, I definitely miss the low population density. Especially with being locked down these days it's really making me question why I live in the city at all. All of the awesome things about it are sort of null and void. At least with Los Angeles it's not far of a drive to get to the wilderness. Of course at the moment we're entering high flammability and yellow jacket season. Which kind of makes camping and picnics a real bummer. I feel bad for all the poor bastards that I left back in New York. Even when things weren't shitty it was still a 4-hour process just to get through New Jersey.
 

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Yeah I hear that. I hear all that. I grew up in Maine, I definitely miss the low population density. Especially with being locked down these days it's really making me question why I live in the city at all. All of the awesome things about it are sort of null and void. At least with Los Angeles it's not far of a drive to get to the wilderness. Of course at the moment we're entering high flammability and yellow jacket season. Which kind of makes camping and picnics a real bummer. I feel bad for all the poor bastards that I left back in New York. Even when things weren't shitty it was still a 4-hour process just to get through New Jersey.
All those people are skipping NJ and heading north these days. They are absolutely trashing Harriman State Park which is a disgrace.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
I had an interesting conversation earlier today where the GM build out of 2,700 chargers came up. Basically, the gist was that people aren't comfortable buying EVs because they look everywhere around their town and see gas stations all over the place. That got me thinking: Is this build out of GM's more about perceptions?

Keep in mind, while they said "cities and suburbs," they were particularly emphasizing "their markets." GM might know full well that these chargers will be nowhere near as useful as dedicated travel chargers; however, people will see them. When they go to the grocery store, or the department store, or their local coffee shops. They are going to see these chargers. This initiative might be a direct assault on the perception that there's no place to charge an EV away from home. Undermining that belief gets people who wouldn't have previously considered an EV thinking about them.

Just a thought, but it seems to have merit.
 

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I got an email from EVgo today that was about the alliance with GM and the 2700 chargers. Those will be in 40 metro areas. If each site has 4 chargers, that will be about 16 chargers per metro area if they were evenly distributed. I guess that will create a bigger presence, though in an area like LA, another 16 sites likely wouldn't stand out. I wonder where those 40 metro areas are. GM has said that the are EV opportunities are on the coasts, so if the new chargers are to benefit GM the most, I would think that they would mostly be in their target market area. California already seems to be well covered, so I don't see how there is an urgent need there. Portland and Seattle could certainly use more, and perhaps some east coast cities. Spread out, 700 new sites will get diluted quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
I got an email from EVgo today that was about the alliance with GM and the 2700 chargers. Those will be in 40 metro areas. If each site has 4 chargers, that will be about 16 chargers per metro area if they were evenly distributed. I guess that will create a bigger presence, though in an area like LA, another 16 sites likely wouldn't stand out. I wonder where those 40 metro areas are. GM has said that the are EV opportunities are on the coasts, so if the new chargers are to benefit GM the most, I would think that they would mostly be in their target market area. California already seems to be well covered, so I don't see how there is an urgent need there. Portland and Seattle could certainly use more, and perhaps some east coast cities. Spread out, 700 new sites will get diluted quickly.
Yes, I got that same email. Even though it would be a default win for EVgo to get 2,700 chargers wherever, I think it we should consider that EVgo should get a bit more out of it than just that. EVgo already has good coverage in cities like Los Angeles, Portland, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco, and Seattle. These 40 metropolitan areas might not be any of those locations, but even if it did include the large cities on the West Coast, it might not matter.

The ones that spring to mind for me are Austin, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas-Fort Worth, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, New York, Phoenix, San Antonio, etc. Basically, if you go down the list of the top 40 cities in the United States by population, six of them are in California, and with Portland and Seattle, that makes eight. That leaves 32 metropolitan areas that could stand to gain quite a lot.

On average, that would allow for about 68 chargers per metropolitan area (I'm sure we could break it down even more by averaging for population). If they follow Electrify America's example, with an average of 4.5 chargers per site (a number of 4 charger sites with a mix of 6, 8, or 10 charger sites), that would be an average of 15 sites per metropolitan area. Even in larger cities, the addition of 15 charging sites with 4 to 10 chargers each would get noticed.
 
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