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I wonder, if they do end up offering battery swaps, about the logistics... Not enough available batteries...
Do they again start with just the 19s (highest risk)? Perhaps, because of the low number of fires in the others, maybe they only do the 19s?
Someone posted on another thread that 2022 packs were Korean made (again). Has me wondering if GM added that plant to pick up volume in anticipation of swaps? Maybe using both MI + Korea for 2022 production?

I would think, like with the SW update, 2019 models would get priority. They would start with those (a fairly small subset of the 2017-2019 user base), then expand to others a month or two later.

Should be interesting. That would be unusually fast for GM, but the regulators may have stipulated that course in the event the SW was inadequate.
 

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Someone posted on another thread that 2022 packs were Korean made (again). Has me wondering if GM added that plant to pick up volume in anticipation of swaps? Maybe using both MI + Korea for 2022 production?

I would think, like with the SW update, 2019 models would get priority. They would start with those (a fairly small subset of the 2017-2019 user base), then expand to others a month or two later.

Should be interesting. That would be unusually fast for GM, but the regulators may have stipulated that course in the event the SW was inadequate.
Buybacks are the most likely endgame IMO. Even if GM did some 50/50 buyback/battery replacement resolution, how easily could GM come up with ~30,000 extra battery packs? Answer is probably not that easily. If they buyback ALL affected Bolts, there's no need to beef up battery production. And if a good chunk of those buybacks are MSRP swaps into 2022 Bolts, that also helps GM move the new Bolts in addition to getting potential firebombs off the roads. Even if GM decides to replace all batteries, what if some problem crops up with the US-made batteries? Then they'll have a whole new problem on their hands.

The cleanest solution is to buyback all affected Bolts. Problem solved, and probably lots of satisfied owners that may become future owners.
 

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Not a huge believer in the accuracy of posts on Reddit, but this is possible...
https://www.reddit.com/r/BoltEV/comments/onq63b
Note: This isn't my link. Saw it posted on a Bolt Facebookpage...
I actually just got off them phone with them. I was told that a new information release was due soon. They offered that one point was that they were going back to recommending limiting the charge to 90% This certainly may not be the full extent of the next information release. It was good to hear that they were getting ready to update us. I really do think we need to hear some results of the investigation so far.
 

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They might not have to manufacture tens of thousands of new battery packs. It is possible that with the right (possibly expensive) equipment and well trained operators bad cells (or whatever the problem is) can be determined. The good parts can be used to assemble refurbished battery packs. Some cars could get completely new packs, some could get refurbished packs, or the refurbished packs could be used for other purposes.
 

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They might not have to manufacture tens of thousands of new battery packs. It is possible that with the right (possibly expensive) equipment and well trained operators bad cells (or whatever the problem is) can be determined. The good parts can be used to assemble refurbished battery packs. Some cars could get completely new packs, some could get refurbished packs, or the refurbished packs could be used for other purposes.
I have to think that even considering the potential $$ savings, this ship has sailed. GM implemented a detection/monitoring fix, and regardless of the details, it didn’t catch 2 “bad packs” - so the headline is that monitoring/detection didn’t work. I don’t think any amount of monitoring/detection is going to pass muster now - they had 6 months to design the previous fix. I think another similar delay would be a poor decision and will push folks to justifiable legal action.
 

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Buybacks are the most likely endgame IMO. Even if GM did some 50/50 buyback/battery replacement resolution, how easily could GM come up with ~30,000 extra battery packs? Answer is probably not that easily. If they buyback ALL affected Bolts, there's no need to beef up battery production. And if a good chunk of those buybacks are MSRP swaps into 2022 Bolts, that also helps GM move the new Bolts in addition to getting potential firebombs off the roads. Even if GM decides to replace all batteries, what if some problem crops up with the US-made batteries? Then they'll have a whole new problem on their hands.

The cleanest solution is to buyback all affected Bolts. Problem solved, and probably lots of satisfied owners that may become future owners.
Some may prefer to keep their cars with replaced batteries (e.g. someone with 120,000 miles may get an unattractive buyback or tradeup offer, or may not like the new Bolt or other GM or other potential replacement vehicles). But if the buyback and tradeup offers are generous enough, they could get most customers to take them, and only have to replace the batteries in relatively few cars.

Note that if lots of customers take a tradeup option and choose new Bolts to trade up to, then they need to ramp up battery production anyway to provide batteries for the extra demand for new Bolts.
 

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They might not have to manufacture tens of thousands of new battery packs. It is possible that with the right (possibly expensive) equipment and well trained operators bad cells (or whatever the problem is) can be determined. The good parts can be used to assemble refurbished battery packs. Some cars could get completely new packs, some could get refurbished packs, or the refurbished packs could be used for other purposes.
If physical inspection to determine which batteries (packs, modules, cells) are defective is possible in a non-destructive manner, it would involve a lot of labor at dealers (at least removing and reinstalling the pack, probably significant other disassembly and reassembly), and would cause a traffic jam for service appointments to get this done. Also, if the procedure is tedious or difficult, it may be error-prone, resulting in some bad packs, modules, or cells slipping through. Of course, depending on the nature of the defect (which has not been publicly disclosed, other than it being different from the one affecting Hyundai Konas), it may not be possible to do a non-destructive physical inspection for the defect.

Probably no one will trust an OBD-II and software check now, since the first attempt failed to catch two defective ones before they caught fire.
 

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I'd be okay with a fresh battery but I suspect they would start with 2019 model year and work their way back to my early 2017, which could take a bloody long time. I got my Bolt used and I'd be happy to get a check for what I paid two years ago and they pick up my car. I'm now working from home and would just bank the money and wait until something else comes out in the "budget" EV category. Even a new Bolt is beyond my reach with the tax credit gone. All the new EV's are big and expensive.
 

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All the new EV's are big and expensive.
Yes, it looks like most companies figured out what Tesla did years ago, which is that it is easier to start at the expensive / luxury end of the market:
  • Can hide the battery cost in a luxury car price more easily (a bigger issue when the Tesla Model S first came out, but still some what of an issue now).
  • Wealthy people are more likely to be homeowners who can have convenient home charging installed.
  • Wealthy people are more likely to have additional vehicles that they can use if they run into limitations of their EV (whether they are EV-related limitations like recharging speed or limitations due to other vehicle characteristics, like not being a van or pickup).
 

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If GM cannot prevent the fires, then the batteries have to be re
With the "final" software, you can set target charge or hilltop reserve to limit charging to lower than 100% to get a similar effect as the interim software.

The "final" software probably detects some high risk conditions before catching fire, even though it obviously fails to detect all of them. So it probably reduces risk, even though it does not eliminate it. It also supposedly uses the horn as a fire alarm if it detects an imminent fire.
The before catching fire part shows that GM has failed and if they can’t prevent the fires, the packs must be replaced. That’s the whole point of a recall.
All we need is one or two more Bolts with the fix to go up in flames and a few complaints to NHTSA (not GM) and maybe we’ll be spared this uncertainty.
 

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Yes, it looks like most companies figured out what Tesla did years ago, which is that it is easier to start at the expensive / luxury end of the market:
  • Can hide the battery cost in a luxury car price more easily (a bigger issue when the Tesla Model S first came out, but still some what of an issue now).
  • Wealthy people are more likely to be homeowners who can have convenient home charging installed.
  • Wealthy people are more likely to have additional vehicles that they can use if they run into limitations of their EV (whether they are EV-related limitations like recharging speed or limitations due to other vehicle characteristics, like not being a van or pickup).
Auto makers have known this for a long time, it is why most new tech shows up in premium models first, then filters down to mainstream models.

Edit: Hit the button before I completed my thought. GM introduced Bolt to beat Tesla to market with an "affordable" 200+ mile EV.

Bolt is probably primarily a ZEV credit project, and a program to help them learn and prepare for the future. Hopefully, they learn. They clearly achieved the ZEV credit goal.
 

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If physical inspection to determine which batteries (packs, modules, cells) are defective is possible in a non-destructive manner, it would involve a lot of labor at dealers (at least removing and reinstalling the pack, probably significant other disassembly and reassembly), and would cause a traffic jam for service appointments to get this done. Also, if the procedure is tedious or difficult, it may be error-prone, resulting in some bad packs, modules, or cells slipping through. Of course, depending on the nature of the defect (which has not been publicly disclosed, other than it being different from the one affecting Hyundai Konas), it may not be possible to do a non-destructive physical inspection for the defect.

Probably no one will trust an OBD-II and software check now, since the first attempt failed to catch two defective ones before they caught fire.
I think I was not clear in my earlier message. I am suggesting that at a facility with the proper diagnostic equipment and trained operators they may be able to isolate, remove, and replace the faulty parts resulting in refurbished packs.

Dealers would replace suspect packs with new or refurbished packs and send the suspect packs to the facility to be refurbished.

If there is a non destructive way to determine faulty parts, a process like this would allow them to fix all the recalled vehicles without significantly affecting the supply chain for new vehicles.
 

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“Out of an abundance of caution, we are asking owners of 2017-2019 Chevrolet Bolt EVs who were part of the recall population to park their vehicles outdoors immediately after charging and not leave their vehicles charging overnight while we investigate these incidents.”

Great. I called my electric utility company and switched to time-of-use metering within months of buying my Bolt in 2019, which means I ONLY charge overnight. Now what do I do? This warning from GM does not fill me with confidence.

I have not been overly alarmed about the battery-recall situation until very recently. I went to my dealer and had both of the recall software fixes done on my 2019 LT, which I bought new in October 2019. Now, suddenly, I feel somewhat activated to press GM for a buyback, or at least a battery replacement. (I doubt my chances for success, since I suspect Virginia's lemon laws won't support a buyback.)

Is anyone else newly alarmed?
Yes, I feel the same way, in upstate NY. Our lemon laws here apparently only cover us for the first two years up to 18k miles.
 

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So far my communications with Chevrolet have been via Twitter direct message. Since my last exchange with the person on that account was last Thursday, I sent a follow-up message today to see what was happening. (I given a case number last week and told that somebody would be in touch.)

I'm still waiting for somebody to call me, but this time the person on the Twitter account told me that, in addition to parking outside and not charging overnight,
Customers should return the vehicle to the 90% state of charge limitation using Hilltop Reserve mode (for 2017-2018 model years) . This adjustment should be made whether or not you've received the current software update.
So now somebody from Chevy has told me, basically, that the second software fix didn't really do anything--or at least that GM doesn't assume that it actually fixed the situation.
 

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So now somebody from Chevy has told me, basically, that the second software fix didn't really do anything--or at least that GM doesn't assume that it actually fixed the situation.
The latest software does something, but obviously is not 100% effective. We (outside of GM, and possibly inside of GM) do not know how effective it is (0%, 99%, or somewhere in between) other than that it is not 100% effective.
 

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So now somebody from Chevy has told me, basically, that the second software fix didn't really do anything--or at least that GM doesn't assume that it actually fixed the situation.
Definitions...
The software was never designed to "fix" the battery problem.
It added monitoring that they were hoping would allow them to identify just the packs that needed to be replaced/fixed.

It did result in identifying some packs needing to be replaced/fixed for some people.

It did not result in finding the issue that triggered fires (or in finding all of them if there are multiple triggers).

So, yes, it did something.
No, it wasn't intended to fix the batteries.
No, it didn't work for what GM was hoping it would do around the fire issue. (Although what it added is still probably valuable.)
 

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I recently purchased a 2021 and at the last charging, I noticed that the area under the hood near the charging inputs was quite hot. Normal?
 
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