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Great. I called my electric utility company and switched to time-of-use metering within months of buying my Bolt in 2019, which means I ONLY charge overnight. Now what do I do? This warning from GM does not fill me with confidence.
I too have a time of day rate. What I did is switched the charging start time associated with the lower rates. After entering departure time for each day, I switched from "earliest possible" to "latest possible" (pg 127 of the 2017 owner's manual). Since my non-peak rate is from 11 PM to 9 AM weekdays and all day weekends, I set my departure time at 8 AM (could have been 9 AM, but you get the idea). It typically starts at 5:30 or 6 AM and is done charging by 8, so it's not usually charging when I'm asleep, plus I understand it's when the battery approaches full charge that it's more critical. I limit the charge will hilltop reserve (90% target later models), and I set a text reminder when the vehicle is finished charging via my Onstar app. It's like clockwork though; at 8 AM, I unplug the car after it's done charging.

Question for a GM technical person. Sometimes, especially when I charge to 100%, the cooling fans are running on high soon after the charge is complete and the indicator light is solid green. When I unplug the charge station, the fans stop running. I understand this is associated with battery cell balancing, and bleeding off individual cells creates heat. Am I correct in unplugging before it can finish the balancing cycle with fans on high? Is this a hazard, or is it outweighed by having all the cells healthily balanced?
 

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When you get a buyback, how much money (depreciation) is subtracted? Was it really worth it?
It varies state by state. In Maryland, manufacturers can NOT deduct any usage fees for MSRP swap buybacks in accordance with MD's lemon laws. In my offer letter, the only thing I am responsible for in swapping my current '19 for a '22 EUV is the current balance on my existing loan. No other fees/taxes, or anything. In fact, I'm actually getting $15 knocked off my current loan balance since the EUV's sticker price is $15 less than my '19 Premier. For anyone in MD that is eligible for a buyback and wants to get another Bolt, swapping into a '22 is almost a no-brainer.
 

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Question for a GM technical person. Sometimes, especially when I charge to 100%, the cooling fans are running on high soon after the charge is complete and the indicator light is solid green. When I unplug the charge station, the fans stop running. I understand this is associated with battery cell balancing, and bleeding off individual cells creates heat. Am I correct in unplugging before it can finish the balancing cycle with fans on high? Is this a hazard, or is it outweighed by having all the cells healthily balanced?
The fans running after charging are typical in warmer times of the year. Charging generates heat (due to electrical resistance). Unplugging immediately after charging reaches target charge levels may deprive the pack of important temperature health cycles. Thermal conditioning is more comprehensive while plugged in, algorithms reduce conditioning when unplugged to preserve range.

This has little, to nothing to do with cell balancing, and everything to do with pack temp regulation. Balancing occurs in the final stages of charging as you near 100%, some say it may not do balancing when you set target charge levels below 100%.

So, no, don't unplug immediately, let it do its thing to optimize the temperature health of your pack.
 

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...Since having the "final remedy" installed on May 11 my 2019 LT continues charging or trying to charge for several hours after the instrument panel and dashboard light indicate that the battery is fully charged...
This is actually normal behavior with the new software update. It's not charging your traction battery, it's continuing to monitor the traction battery. The power is being used to maintain the 12V battery (which runs the onboard computer) and/or run the battery cooling system after the traction battery has been charged.
 

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Am I correct in unplugging before it can finish the balancing cycle with fans on high? Is this a hazard, or is it outweighed by having all the cells healthily balanced?
The battery conditioning temperature set points are different between plugged in and unplugged. So when you unplug the conditioning stops. There's no clear evidence that there's any balancing going on. So unplugging is not an issue. Just that your battery will be a little warmer starting out and if it's a warm day, might condition later when the unplugged temperature set point is reached.
 

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That's not good. Hopefully they just start replacing battery packs and be done with it.

What do you think they'll do for anyone who bought a Bolt used?
ABSOLUTELY they should start replacing battery packs!!! That is THE ONLY solution to correct the issue and give EV customers what they PAID FOR!!! The "software fix" is bullshitt!!

They won't do JACK for used car buyers, you can bet on that!!
 

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They won't do JACK for used car buyers, you can bet on that!!
Recall work happens to cars, regardless of whether they are new or used.
Takata airbags, Ford ignition switches...
That happened for the used cars as well as the new... ;-)
 

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I live in the middle of a forest. In a semi-arid part of the country. Even if I could charge elsewhere, parking in my driveway runs the risk of starting a wildfire like Waldo Canyon Fire - Wikipedia (346 homes destroyed) or Black Forest Fire - Wikipedia (509 homes destroyed, 2 deaths).

Would GM like to accept that liability?
I also live in a high-wildfire-risk area. We have 30-50 mph winds 8-10 hours per day most days so any fire that starts during those hours is unstoppable. A few days back there was a house fire in our community. The FD sent 14 fire trucks, not to save the house but to surround the fire and keep it from spreading. Fortunately, the wind was calm at the time - otherwise, the FD said that the whole valley would have burned. I mentioned that our community has 2000 homes with an average value of $1-2 million. That's $2-4 billion in liability for GM. I mentioned this to the concierge and she said she would pass that along.
 

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They won't do JACK for used car buyers, you can bet on that!!
If you check the buyback threads, even many customers who bought secondhand have been able to get GM assistance getting out of their vehicle. And when it comes to safety recalls, they apply to ALL effected vehicles, regardless of age, mileage, or number of owners.
 

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If you check the buyback threads, even many customers who bought secondhand have been able to get GM assistance getting out of their vehicle. And when it comes to safety recalls, they apply to ALL effected vehicles, regardless of age, mileage, or number of owners.
But ONLY when it is consistent with state buyback laws. Chevy isn’t really “helping” anyone as much as they are complying with state law. Chevy is going to have to come up with a permanent solution that does not rely on local buyback law. Or their going to get sued.
 

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Sometimes, especially when I charge to 100%, the cooling fans are running on high soon after the charge is complete and the indicator light is solid green. When I unplug the charge station, the fans stop running.
See my reply at GM is Issuing a Recall Based on the Fires which has been the behavior even WAY before Nov 13, 2020 (when the battery fire recall was issued). If it is hot/my battery is hot, I most definitely can trigger thermal management right upon plug in even with no charging (e.g. SoC well above target charge level setting). And, I've definitely triggered thermal management on other Bolts on hot days at work in 2019 right upon plugging into level 2 (well within ~10 seconds).

Also see Battery conditioning. Google makes for a good unit converter (e.g. 27 c in f). 27 C is 80.6 F BTW.
 

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But ONLY when it is consistent with state buyback laws. Chevy isn’t really “helping” anyone as much as they are complying with state law. Chevy is going to have to come up with a permanent solution that does not rely on local buyback law. Or their going to get sued.
It could be worse. At least they didn't force everybody through formal lemon law proceedings. Of course, that was in their own best interest, too. Lawyers are expensive.
 

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It could be worse. At least they didn't force everybody through formal lemon law proceedings. Of course, that was in their own best interest, too. Lawyers are expensive.
Very true. And I am happy for anyone who was successful and satisfied from their buyback or swap process. It’s just a little frustrating since when (prior to recall) and where we bought our Bolt have no impact on its failings, but all the difference on how it is addressed at this point.
 

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I wish the title thread here could be changed. Implies EVERY Bolt should be parked outside. Not true. Just recalled '17-19 Bolts.
It would have applied to my recalled '19, but GM bought it back a month ago.:)
 

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I wish the title thread here could be changed. Implies EVERY Bolt should be parked outside. Not true. Just recalled '17-19 Bolts.
It would have applied to my recalled '19, but GM bought it back a month ago.:)
You do realize this is in the 2017-2019 Fire recall sub forum, right?
 

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If there are ~70,000 2017-19 Bolts subject to the recalls, and they've been around 4.5, 3.5 and 2.5 years respectively, so say 3.5 years on average, and there have been 3 fires not caused by charging to over 90%, that makes the probability of a fire in one <90% charged Bolt during one month, about this:
3 fires / (70,000 Bolts * 3.5 years old on average * 12 months per year) = 3 / about 3 million = 0.000001 or a 0.0001% chance of a fire in my Bolt in the next month.

Does anyone see anything wrong in this calculation? If not, one can still certainly invoke the precautionary principle or some version of "common sense" to choose to park outside. It is one of those low risk, high consequence events. But it seems to me more like vanishingly low risk, possibly very high consequence. Descriptions of the fires seem to suggest it's somewhat contained to the rear seat. Who knows, but a fire probably wouldn't always spread to the structure.

About the time I got my Bolt, I was given a 50% chance of 5-year survival (cancer). 50% odds definitely was motivational! In the universe of things to worry about, I'm not sure a tiny chance of a Bolt fire makes the cut.

Other curiosities: I happen to have a wimpy 20 amp max Level 2 charger. I couldn't find anything about speed of charge related to fires, but it seems plausible that more rapid charging might cause more overheating. Also, I live on a hill so always charged to 90% max, and never bothered to get the "fix," figuring I'd turn it in (leased) and let them mess with it. As an ex software engineer, I know that all patches have problems. Could it be that these new post-"fix" fires might be caused by the fix itself? I have zero evidence to think this, just wondering.

Finally, I have a lease that expires in 10/2021. Any clever things I might try, to leverage the problem with respect to potentially buying the car? I love my Bolt.... but the Ford Mach-E has rear wheel drive, so obviously correct for EVs with more than Leaf-size horsepower.

Thanks for any opinions!
 
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