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General Motors is on a roll when it comes with electric vehicles, with a lofty goal of launching 20 new all-electric vehicles by 2023 and introducing the first two in the next 18 months.

Confirmed in a press release yesterday, Mark Reuss, vice president of global product development said, "GM believes the future is all electric." Although their vision of a world with zero emissions will take time and effort from all manufacturers, GM is committed to making it a reality and tackling the problem with a two-pronged approach; battery electric and hydrogen fuel cell electric.

The first two new all-electric vehicles will be engineered based on what GM has learned from the Chevrolet Bolt EV and they’ll feature an “all-new battery system,” reports Automotive News. Perhaps a good place for Bolt feedback and a list of areas needing improvement would be our forum’s Nitpick thread and of course, who can forget the ongoing seat complaint thread.

Not only is GM electrifying personal vehicles, the automaker is also working on a Silent Utility Rover Universal Superstructure (SURUS) concept. Sitting on a heavy-duty truck frame featuring a fuel-cell powertrain, four-wheel steering, and two electric motors, it is meant for use in delivery vehicles, trucks or even ambulances.

So far, GM has not specified which of its sub-brands will be receiving these vehicles so we’ll just have to wait and see.
 

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I thought it was already a given that next was Buick with it's version of the Bolt? Is that not so? I wonder how many of these new "electric vehicles" will actually be hybrids, or plug in hybrids? The natural assumption is BEV, but it could mean anything with an electric motor involved in propulsion.
 

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I wouldn't mind seeing an all electric crossover or SUV, granted it'll weight a ton with the batteries needed for a substantial amount of range, but all that extra space and sitting higher up is appealing.
 

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I wouldn't mind seeing an all electric crossover or SUV, granted it'll weight a ton with the batteries needed for a substantial amount of range, but all that extra space and sitting higher up is appealing.
Those types of cars will have a Volt class battery or less, and won't get much range on the batteries. They will have great milage though, 50+ probably. Main energy savings is reduced reliance on gas and regenerative braking. They may or may not be plug in. I think GM's approach with the Volt where the engine is more to charge the batteries than drive the wheels, but I'd guess these larger hybrids would probably take more of a Prius approach. OTOH GM has all of it's experience with the Volt, so they may well just continue with that, which is what I consider a superior approach.
 

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Without a charging network like Tesla, I think GM needs to be careful about expanding too much here. If I buy a second electric vehicle to replace my ICE it would have to be a Tesla with the supercharging network. The Bolt is the perfect commuter car and I have 13,000 miles on it so far. However, if I drive further than 100 miles one way I drive the other car. Don't trust the charging networks yet or the EVGO chargers are crazy expensive. Cheaper to just drive my Explorer on long trips.

The news I want to hear is that GM is partnering with Tesla on making a more powerful charging network. If that happened I would be buying a second Bolt right now.
 

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Without a charging network like Tesla, I think GM needs to be careful about expanding too much here. If I buy a second electric vehicle to replace my ICE it would have to be a Tesla with the supercharging network. The Bolt is the perfect commuter car and I have 13,000 miles on it so far. However, if I drive further than 100 miles one way I drive the other car. Don't trust the charging networks yet or the EVGO chargers are crazy expensive. Cheaper to just drive my Explorer on long trips.

The news I want to hear is that GM is partnering with Tesla on making a more powerful charging network. If that happened I would be buying a second Bolt right now.
Just an idea but get the second Bolt and rent a car for long trips. Renting is easy and cheap, leave your Bolt parked at the dealership and it's there when you get back. That's my approach eventually.

On GM I don't think they will or necessarily should work on the charging/supply side of the equation. They're on the demand side which is more powerful and profitable, by pumping out EV's of various types they are creating demand for EV charging supply. Shell is saying they'll invest $4.5B in electrifying their gas stations and already have a pilot program in a few countries (not the US). As demand grows expect this to turn into a race. Gas stations are pretty ideal as charging stations, they usually have extra parking, electrical infrastructure and with people hanging out for a half hour or so they can make the real money which is off the shop.

At any rate their early push into mainstream EV's may not even have charging, with the larger vehicles I'd expect to see HEV's due to the present day energy density of batteries.
 

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I wouldn't mind seeing an all electric crossover or SUV, granted it'll weight a ton with the batteries needed for a substantial amount of range, but all that extra space and sitting higher up is appealing.
I'm kind of the opposite. I wish we could get more sport wagons. More space inside, but lower to the ground. I'm not a fan of riding around in vehicles like I'm riding in a school bus. The Bolt seats are already a little too high for my taste. However, get back to me when I'm older... likely I'll be begging for those high chairs! :laugh:
 

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Without a charging network like Tesla, I think GM needs to be careful about expanding too much here. .
I certainly hope that people like shopping centers and rest areas on highways will soon have their own, non-network DC stations. I can't see why even a 50A station with a card reader, when more or less mass-produced, should cost $30K, as someone mentioned in the Chargepoint thread on this forum. It's more like $2K, including the card reader or a money-swallower.

The great thing about EV chargers that they don't need to be in a special zone, as there is no storage of X thousand gallons of flammable, toxic stuff involved.

Besides, it's not only revenue at the DC charger that the mall would be interested in; it would be a way to get people to spend 30 minutes, browsing the mall :)

Energy companies would be very silly not to diversify into electricity, too.

What car manufacturers should agree on is that every electric car needs to be able to charge from any station, which would require making protocols compatible - or try to stand on their own.
 

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They will all be all electric. Remember, he said zero-emissions, regardless of the fact that there are no zero emission electric grids.
 

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For reasons I will not go into, the Level 2 station on our campus will cost nearly $10K.

For a Level 3 station, the trenching is expensive, the copper is expensive (e.g. $15/foot x 100 feet = $1500), the inverter to change ac into dc is expensive, the transformer which changes line voltage of 17K volts down to 450 volts is expensive, the non-networked unit may be $5500 and if networked, $7500. Labor will be upwards of $150/hour x two people times 20 hours. But I still do not see why it should cost $30K...
 

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You obviously are not aware of the future of chargingnetworks - they will NOT be Tesla networks, which can only charge their cars. All of the automakers are going to BAE Combo, CCS , which just recently upgraded their specs to include 350 KW chargers, as opposed to the 120 KW chargers now in Tesla's network. It doesn't reqiore a lot of thought to realize that the auto companies are not goingto own the networks, nor shoud they - they should be independent, with real competition, just like current gas stations.
And you will need LOTS of charging pods , as over 120 new electric models have been announced the the automakers over the next few years. We have 1 million gas pumps. A charger can't recharge as fast as a gas pump can refuel, so, all things equal, you would presumably need 5 times more chargers, EXCEPT for the fact that a lot of folks can recharge at home and only need DCFCs on trips or if unable to recharge at home.
Also , Tesla has no patents on anything of importance, including their supercharger protocols. Any company can build electrics that can be charged rapidly - that is what
GM was referring to when they talked about improving the batteries. Until now, CCS chargers were limited I believe to 75 KW. That has all changed. And since all the automakers are using that protocol, that is the protocol that all of the charging stations will use, and they will VASTLY outnumber Tesla Supercharger stations. There will be one on every corner, not every 80 miles like Tesla. Tesla will have to give up their supercharger protocol and join everyone else.
 

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I want 2 seat "sports" car. heck bring back the Fiero / Solstice /
You and me both! Sadly, 2 seat roadsters just aren't very popular. Most car companies struggle with them, particularly anything even close to affordable. There was a company that tried to make an electric Solstice conversion that they were hoping to market, but the prototype turned out so bad, they abandoned the project. There is a remote possibility that the next generation Corvette may have an optional hybrid drive system and it could even be a plug in, but all electric is unlikely.

Supposedly, Tesla's going to make another roadster... someday if we all live long enough. Start saving now, it won't be cheap.
 

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When Chevy/GM actually have TV COMMERCIALS to educate buying people and show they are Serious about the BEV, then and only then will I actually believe they want to do as they say.

Although I must say that I am impressed with the Bolt and the distance it can go. The car itself is good, not great but good. About in line with the way they make things now.

Also, when I had the i-MiEV and my truck was being an ass I just rented a car for really long trips. It is easy and cheap when you think about it. No Maintenance, Ins, cleaning housing...
 

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When Chevy/GM actually have TV COMMERCIALS to educate buying people and show they are Serious about the BEV, then and only then will I actually believe they want to do as they say.

Although I must say that I am impressed with the Bolt and the distance it can go. The car itself is good, not great but good. About in line with the way they make things now.

Also, when I had the i-MiEV and my truck was being an ass I just rented a car for really long trips. It is easy and cheap when you think about it. No Maintenance, Ins, cleaning housing...
How many Tesla ads have you seen? Is Tesla not serious about BEVs either? The power of traditional advertising to generate actual sales has always been over estimated IMO.
 

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Chevy has a TON of ads for ICE cars, tesla has none at all.

Chevy wants to sell ICE, not BEV, shoot they even have a Volt in ads with other ICE cars.

I just think that if they were SERIOUS about launching that many EV cars they would start with the Bolt.

bte I can't tell you how many times people think I say Volt.... another Duh moment Chevy .

Course Mitsubishi did the same, my i-MiEV is odd too. I still don't know how to say it so I just say 'i'
 

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What car manufacturers should agree on is that every electric car needs to be able to charge from any station, which would require making protocols compatible - or try to stand on their own.
There is a standard accepted by all domestic and international EV manufacturers (except Tesla and Nissan/Renault) and it is the SAE J1772 CCS. Any Tesla owner can buy an adapter to charge there, too. So the protocol standard does exits. :)

BTW, the SAE were who standarized the gasoline filler hose and inlet sizes and diameters (one for leaded and one for unleaded). Can you imagine if Tesla sold gas cars with a different shaped filler inlet?:(
 
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