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Discussion Starter #1
Some were sceptical (myself included) when it was announced that the Bolt would rely on CF processes for its light weight.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-11-10/gm-supplier-teijin-targets-mass-produced-carbon-fiber-cars.html

Teijin aims to take the lead after GM approved its new technology to cut molding time and costs to enable mass production for passenger vehicles, Takashi Yoshino, head of Teijin’s carbon fiber and composite business, said last week.

“Rather than just for luxury and sports cars, we will seek to establish an overwhelming position in the general-use car market,” Yoshino said.

The company is studying the feasibility of building a new factory in the U.S. to produce carbon fiber, and plans to construct another facility in North America to produces parts made with the material, he said.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can't wait for the day that some mainstream EV come with a carbon fiber monocoque :D
you know monocoque and mainstream are anathema to one another right? Monocoque is the epitome of bespoke, by hand production...

Commercial car bodies are almost never monocoques; instead modern cars use unitary construction or unit body, unibody, or Body Frame Integral construction,[7] with box sections, bulkheads and tubes providing most of the strength of the vehicle, while the skin adds relatively little to the strength or stiffness. The term monocoque has often been misused when referring to unibody cars. [8]

In modern motor racing however, the safety of the driver depends on the extraordinary strength of the car body which must meet stringent design regulations and a small number of cars have been built with monocoque structures.[9][10]
 

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Not only will using CF have benefits for fuel economy, it will also be cool to see that material used for its aesthetics. It is a premium material and could do some really nice things if used in mainstream models.
 

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Not only will using CF have benefits for fuel economy, it will also be cool to see that material used for its aesthetics. It is a premium material and could do some really nice things if used in mainstream models.
its only a premium material because of manufacturing costs. The initiative is to bring down costs and transition CF from a premium material to one viable for volume. If its going to replace steel it needs to be cost competitive...
 

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its only a premium material because of manufacturing costs. The initiative is to bring down costs and transition CF from a premium material to one viable for volume. If its going to replace steel it needs to be cost competitive...
I just meant premium as far as the way it looks. Right now CF is seen as a fancy material both for its lightweight and strength but also the way that it looks. Mainstream vehicles could start looking a little fancier if they all have access to CF as a cheaper material.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I just meant premium as far as the way it looks. Right now CF is seen as a fancy material both for its lightweight and strength but also the way that it looks. Mainstream vehicles could start looking a little fancier if they all have access to CF as a cheaper material.
CF only looks expensive because it is expensive... the only reason its used aesthetically (real or fake) is because people associate high cost with Carbon Fibre.

When the cost comes down it no longer holds allure, how can it look expensive without being expensive... ;)
 
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