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Second time in the last 3 months I managed to get a screw in the tire (see picture). The tire started to deflate fairly quickly. Stopped, reinflated tire. Couldn't visually find the screw. Air still going down. Stopped again, found the screw, removed it and pumped to about 40 psi. Drove for about 10 km., stopped, let some air out to correct pressure and then drove on. So far so good with pressure holding. The trick seems to be to remove the object put air in, drive a while and that allows the goo in the tire to seal it up. Works like a charm though I don't want to keep testing this technology!
 

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Second time in the last 3 months I managed to get a screw in the tire (see picture). The tire started to deflate fairly quickly. Stopped, reinflated tire. Couldn't visually find the screw. Air still going down. Stopped again, found the screw, removed it and pumped to about 40 psi. Drove for about 10 km., stopped, let some air out to correct pressure and then drove on. So far so good with pressure holding. The trick seems to be to remove the object put air in, drive a while and that allows the goo in the tire to seal it up. Works like a charm though I don't want to keep testing this technology!
Bummer about getting "screwed", but at least it didn't turn in to a bigger problem. Also nice to hear a story of the goop in the OEM tires actually working to seal a leak. Most stories I've seen about the effectiveness of the Bolt's self-sealing weren't positive ones.
 

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Mine was negative with removal of the jagged piece of metal, good for a month, then never holding the seal. We took it off twice to examine it and even painted it from the inside. Still would not hold air. Had to buy a new tire to the cost of $190 or so.
 

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Second time in the last 3 months I managed to get a screw in the tire (see picture). The tire started to deflate fairly quickly. Stopped, reinflated tire. Couldn't visually find the screw. Air still going down. Stopped again, found the screw, removed it and pumped to about 40 psi. Drove for about 10 km., stopped, let some air out to correct pressure and then drove on. So far so good with pressure holding. The trick seems to be to remove the object put air in, drive a while and that allows the goo in the tire to seal it up. Works like a charm though I don't want to keep testing this technology!
I'd say you've done your test tour of duty.
 

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Mine was negative with removal of the jagged piece of metal, good for a month, then never holding the seal. We took it off twice to examine it and even painted it from the inside. Still would not hold air. Had to buy a new tire to the cost of $190 or so.
I don't think the self sealing tech is designed to do anything more than get you home.
 

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I don't think the self sealing tech is designed to do anything more than get you home.
Energy Saver A/S Selfseal tires feature a sticky, viscous coating on the inside of the tire that instantly seals nail or screw punctures up to ¼" in diameter. The Selfseal Technology is designed to permanently fill the path of the puncture when the object is removed.
source
 

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Mine was negative with removal of the jagged piece of metal, good for a month, then never holding the seal. We took it off twice to examine it and even painted it from the inside. Still would not hold air. Had to buy a new tire to the cost of $190 or so.
Was it a sidewall hit? Or a puncture that couldn't be plugged? I had a nail the first month and I drove it into the dealer, they put a plug in it.
 

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These can be repaired with conventional inner patches. Tire stores don't like to do it because of the yukk they have to clean off to do it. I've lost the link to the Michelin website page that shows how. I got it to try and convince a Michelin dealer to patch the tire with no luck--They said it couldn't be done, and Michelin refused to contact them to explain otherwise.
 

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These can be repaired with conventional inner patches. Tire stores don't like to do it because of the yukk they have to clean off to do it. I've lost the link to the Michelin website page that shows how. I got it to try and convince a Michelin dealer to patch the tire with no luck--They said it couldn't be done, and Michelin refused to contact them to explain otherwise.

Which is why I carry a copy of the official Michelin document (with pretty pictures) explaining the procedure.
 

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These can be repaired with conventional inner patches. Tire stores don't like to do it because of the yukk they have to clean off to do it. I've lost the link to the Michelin website page that shows how. I got it to try and convince a Michelin dealer to patch the tire with no luck--They said it couldn't be done, and Michelin refused to contact them to explain otherwise.
https://www.chevybolt.org/forum/242282-post5.html
 

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...and as I always say in these threads, a tire plug can usually permanently fix the puncture in less time than it takes to change a tire or for a tow to arrive. Certainly faster than driving to a tire shop and waiting for them to service the tire (and make up reasons why you need to purchase a new tire or set of tires).

Don't know why anyone would go without a $2 kit.

Regarding games salesmen play, I have no patience for them. If a tire shop told me I needed to buy a new tire, I'd tell them that if they don't know how to patch a tire, I'd take it to someone competent enough to do it, and they will return the car to me in the condition in which I gave it to them.
 

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Well, this has been enlightening. 9200 miles ago, I had a screw in my front left. I was 1 mile from the dealer when I got the screw. The pressure was dropping. They plugged the tire, right there in the service bay, didn't even take the wheel/tire off the car. I said to the advisor it was a run flat, and laughes as I said it was going flat. He said he would check to see if it could be plugged, he said some can be plugged and others have to be replaced, went 'online' and said 'yes'. A minute later, a mechanic turned the wheel to get a good view of the screw/bolt sticking out, pulled it and plugged it in about 10 seconds. I've since put over 9000 miles on it so I'm not 'terribly' worried. But it's good to know that the plug may not be the go-to answer although I'm old school and find them to be a great repair option, even though the book may say not to. Ironically, I took a picture of the process. Cropped the mechanic out.
 

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Maybe the next generation of EVs can use the immense power stored in the battery to energize four electromagnets hanging ahead of all tires to pull up any foreign steel and iron materials, such as screws and nails, before they puncture the tires.
 

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I said to the advisor it was a run flat, and laughes as I said it was going flat.
He might have laughed because you do not have a run flat tire, which is a tire designed to be driven on with zero air pressure.

I'm surprised a dealer would use a plug, as I always see tire shops using patches from the inside. For some reason plugs are not considered permanent repairs in the industry.

Maybe the next generation of EVs can use the immense power stored in the battery to energize four electromagnets hanging ahead of all tires to pull up any foreign steel and iron materials, such as screws and nails, before they puncture the tires.
I've wondered if DOT vehicles could just have rare earth magnet bars attached to the front to pick up ferrous debris. The problem is that you still need to be fairly close to the object for it to pick it up, and there's plenty of debris like tire carcass that could rip such a device off. Maybe electromagnet is the way to go.
 

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Maybe the next generation of EVs can use the immense power stored in the battery to energize four electromagnets hanging ahead of all tires to pull up any foreign steel and iron materials, such as screws and nails, before they puncture the tires.
Immense power? You are living in a different universe than the rest of us live in. The Bolts battery carries as much energy as 1.8 gallons of gasoline

Btw, I'll skip commenting on the viability of the solution itself...
 

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Immense power? You are living in a different universe than the rest of us live in. The Bolts battery carries as much energy as 1.8 gallons of gasoline

Btw, I'll skip commenting on the viability of the solution itself...
Pretty sure it was a joke and I find the visual HILARIOUS.
 

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Center tread puncture is perfect. About a 3min plug job if you wanted to. Since I'm crazy frugal, I'd probably run it at least all summer to enjoy the efficiency benefits of worn tires, and only replace them in the fall if the car was hydroplaning too much. Heck, I'm so cheap I'd probably run those another 2 years.
 

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I just found out I got screwed too.
My tread is down to about 3/32nds, so at least I got screwed at the right time.
Looks like that screw has been there awhile. With self-sealing tires, we're all potentially running around with nails and screws in our tires. Just pull that bad boy out and air it up and you're good to go.
 
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