Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It has been discussed in some other places that the Bolt navigation featured will be driven by Apple Car Play and Android Auto. This has some positive and negative aspects. The positives that I see is that it will not be required to go to the dealer for system updates and that because it is relying on Google or Apple map data, you will not have to pay upwards of $150 or more to get updated map data.
However, these systems require smartphone integration and this presents a unique problem for some folks.
Here we can discuss what is specifically required and if there are any workarounds for those who may not have a cell phone or smart phone and may not want to incur that expense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
I don't think there's really a way around getting a smartphone, if you take a look at the linked pages you'll see that they specifically mention the phone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
So here is a thought. Pick up a used phone that meets the requirements and don't activate it. Download the map data over WiFi at home and then theoretically you should be good to go. You can pick up a Nexus 5x which is one of the newest android phones and running the latest and greatest version of android for between $150 and $200.

Is there anyone who has a vehicle with Android Auto who can confirm that this works?

I would think the same could probably be done with iOS and Apple Carplay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
So here is a thought. Pick up a used phone that meets the requirements and don't activate it. Download the map data over WiFi at home and then theoretically you should be good to go. You can pick up a Nexus 5x which is one of the newest android phones and running the latest and greatest version of android for between $150 and $200.

Is there anyone who has a vehicle with Android Auto who can confirm that this works?

I would think the same could probably be done with iOS and Apple Carplay.
I don't see why that wouldn't work... seems to make sense. I have quite a few old iPhones kicking around at home somewhere
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
However, these systems require smartphone integration and this presents a unique problem for some folks.
Here we can discuss what is specifically required and if there are any workarounds for those who may not have a cell phone or smart phone and may not want to incur that expense.

So just go "old-school' and use a paper map. I still keep them in my glove box, since I use them "offline" (when the car is parked and off), my present 2009 Chevy Equinox doesn't have any navigation system (OnStar doesn't work in Puerto Rico), and I save time and energy planning my trips without needed a "step-by-step" navigation system. People have been navigating with paper maps for centuries!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
I can't remember the last time I've seen or heard someone using a paper map. The most oldschool thing I've remembered was people using print outs of google maps directions lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
I can't remember the last time I've seen or heard someone using a paper map. The most oldschool thing I've remembered was people using print outs of google maps directions lol
My wife has a tank bag for her motorcycle with a map display pocket, and does use it on our long trips. I have a GPS on my bike, but when planning long trips or just roaming for a week or so, a paper map is much better at giving the big picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I believe there are 2 things that benefit an EV driver with a GPS system. First, you have access to data on locations of charging stations. This to me is a key to being able to extend your range, sure with over 200 miles the daily need for this will be reduced, but for those who live in a large metropolitan area (Dallas, LA) it would not be a stretch to easily exceed that. Second, if you want to be able to take longer trips in the vehicle (which is really the whole draw to the extended range) then you will be in unfamiliar territory and having up to date map information will be imperative to ensuring that your route will enable you to reach your destination.

I know that Nissan has a specific GPS application where it shows the nearest charging stations, as well as a radius overlay on the map that indicates your current range, and then half of that range to help you know if you will make it there and back again. I don't know if something like this will be available from GM, but I do know that both Apple and Google maps have EV charging stations listed as points of interest. Simply having that readout of distance to destination to be able to compare to the estimated range is something that is much more of a concern in a BEV and will continue to be until we have charging stations on every corner as we do gas stations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
Planning your trip ahead is better than just relying on an active navigation system to indicate where charging stations are. Use web sites such as Plugshare to find the stations, then plan your route along their locations. You should rely more on common sense and visual navigation as you drive (having such skills as a Boy Scout really helps!), and enjoy your trip instead of getting "range anxiety" (fear of running out of power) and "GPS anxiety" (fear of getting lost) while you are on the road.

If your trip has no charging stations where you need it, you will know that when you are planning and can change the route before the actual travel. Finally, do you trust the navigational data wholeheartly? What would you do when the navigation system points to a needed charging station, and when you arrive with a low charge, that station is out of service?

The Chevy Bolt EV has a 250+ mile range, but if I have to drive farther than that, I see that intent as a waste of my resources, I will prefer to travel by other means (train, bus, or plane), and I will let someone else drive for me.

BTW, having gas stations at every corner is more of a bother than an asset because I plan my life to prevent driving, thus burning less gasoline, less visits to a gas station, and saving money and lost time in the long term. Everyone should do the same and you will not need a charging ststion at every corner, either. Your home station will be good enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
You should rely more on common sense and visual navigation as you drive (having such skills as a Boy Scout really helps!), and enjoy your trip instead of getting "range anxiety" (fear of running out of power) and "GPS anxiety" (fear of getting lost) while you are on the road.
Reliance on a GPS can disconnect someone from their surroundings, I agree. At the same time a GPS is liberating because you wouldn't need to plan every trip down to the minute. Electricity is more prevalent than gas, yet we don't have the CCS infrastructure to head in any direction like you could in a gasoline car. I'm talking in particular about a standalone GPS not requiring any cellular data that can be periodically updated with the latest stations and allow someone, should they choose, to further disengage with all the noise.

Raymondjram you sound like you have all the transportation options at your fingertips to avoid what you dislike. For some of us, though, it's the cell phones, landlines, and other communication tools that we'd sooner dispense with--including the laptop you presumably use to browse the Internet before leaving the house.

I like the idea about using a decommissioned cell phone, but I'll be mounting my Garmin GPS in my EV.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
787 Posts
Personally I prefer to use a built-in Navigation system in a car. It's always on, it has a larger screen, the controls are all integrated into the car, voice prompts are automatically routed through the car's existing sound system, and you don't have to rely on a cell-phone data signal to get your map data. I know that Google maps has the ability to work offline but you potentially have to download the data ahead of time and store it on your phone, taking up precious space.

I have an iPhone. I'll obviously have to use Apple CarPlay if I want to be able to use Navigation in the car. As far as I know, Apple Maps doesn't allow you to download map data like Google Maps. I am concerned about the amount of extra data I may have to burn on my cell-phone plan in order to get map data. We'll have to see how bad it is. The incremental monthly cost may be cheaper in the long run than buying a standalone Garmin unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
The big downside to built in Nav is that it is expensive and always out of date. On Chevy vehicles where you can add Nav to the MyLink, it's $495. Updates are annual (@$159/yr), and those are usually 6+ months out of date when released. Not a big deal for most roads in most areas, but if you use the POI feature at all (charging stations, restaraunts, etc), they are not useless, but also not very reliable/accurate.

I have never seen a Nav system that even approaches web based searches. Occasionally Google et al will get it wrong, but exponentially more robust and accurate than what can fit into the SD card (or other memory) of stand alone units.

If you go with a stand alone like a Garmin, it will cost less, usually have lifetime map updates (and often traffic) and updates are more frequent. But, you have to find someplace to mount it and either stash it (and all signs of the mounting/charging system) or risk a busted window when you return to your car.

Since the charging infrastructure is even thinner than cell phone coverage outside of urban/suburban areas, I don't see it as a big deal and I'd much rather have current info on a large screen than use my Garmin (or the Ford or Honda nav systems I currently have in my vehicles)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
If you download the maps to your phone does this mean you don't need to be connected to WIFI or a cell tower while driving? How much memory would be needed for the maps?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I was disappointed to learn that the Bolt has no built-in nav. We also have a 2017 Volt and it has built-in nav. I've used a dash-mounted Garmin in my other cars for years. I also dislike the Maps app on my iPhone. So, I just bought a new Garmin and will use it in my Bolt. Not the ideal solution, but at least I'm familiar with the Garmin and I know it will get me where I need to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I was disappointed to learn that the Bolt has no built-in nav. We also have a 2017 Volt and it has built-in nav. I've used a dash-mounted Garmin in my other cars for years. I also dislike the Maps app on my iPhone. So, I just bought a new Garmin and will use it in my Bolt. Not the ideal solution, but at least I'm familiar with the Garmin and I know it will get me where I need to go.
The ideal solution would be for CarPlay to support other nav software, like Google Maps and Waze.

You can't beat connected to the internet nav, routing you around slowdowns is a winner the portable Garmins just don't do. But I understand the appeal, my 90 year old father uses a Garmin on their road trips. As long as you are sticking to the major highways and not trying to navigate through some complex city like Boston at rush hour the Garmins do the job fine.

I have zero interest in nav embedding in the infotainment center. Smart phones are more powerful than any infotainment center and you don't have to pay OnStar $20+/mo to keep them connected to the Internet. Chevy had a terrible solution for onboard Nav in the Spark EV, awful and you had to pay for it. No thanks, CarPlay is better and while I dislike Android Auto, it at least works decently with Google Maps.

Garmin would be better off running Android on their devices and hooking into modern cars through Android Auto, Then you'd be happy too. Choices are better than getting forced fed whatever the manufacturer implements in their underpowered infotainment center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,737 Posts
You can't beat connected to the internet nav, routing you around slowdowns is a winner the portable Garmins just don't do.
Some of the new Garmins have a Bluetooth connection to a phone app that will relay data such as traffic updates to them. They also do voice-activated navigation and will read incoming text messages.

I really like my Garmin with its 7" screen, and I also like the idea of having it installed and always available without having to fiddle with connecting and disconnecting the phone each time. Plus the possibility of avoiding so many of the infotainment problems people seem to run into when they connect their phone to do anything more complex with it than answer the phone via Bluetooth.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top