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Discussion Starter #1
Never really thought of this surprisingly, but it definitely is a possibility. Tesla's got hacked before. Pretty sure the same can happen with the Bolt ? Again, I'm not very knowledgeable on this matter but it would be great to learn some opinions ? Came about this when I read an article titled "Hacking a Car Might Lead to Life in Prison" I could post it below if anyone would like to read it as well.
 

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If you can access it remotely, it can be hacked.
This applies to internet connected garage doors, irrigation systems, car preconditioning, etc.

This is not an EV specific issue, but is something to keep in mind. Tesla is the only auto maker that I know of that has "Over the air" upgrades to it's software and systems. While more convenient than bringing to the shop (sometimes many hundreds of miles away for Tesla owners), it certainly makes the car more vulnerable to malicious attacks. That being said, Tesla is proactive in keeping the car buttoned up. They attend Defcon every year and offer cash bounties for those that can find any vulnerabilities.

I think the Tesla hacking you're referring to is explained in this article. It required disassembly of the dashboard.
http://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/tesla-hackers-explain-how-they-did-it-at-def-con-23/
 

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This will almost always be an issue even if they get into different types of encryption there will always be someone with a way to get in, some back door or something that requires a patch yet again. It's why Apple comes out with so many updates, they patch those back doors and those holes in the system that people find.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
True ... it's pretty much un-avoidable.. and I see what you mean by not just an EV specific issue. I guess once it has some sort of software, it's "hackable". But that Tesla article was a really good read. Seems they're really trying their hardest to keep everything tight which is admirable.

Never really thought of it like that, but this is definitely helping me open up my mind to different things, thanks a lot guys !
 

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Tesla seems to be mostly air tight.
Mahaffey and Rogers demonstrated that although the Model S isn't unhackable, its information systems are remarkably well designed and secured, rendering their hacking methods largely impractical for for anyone who doesn't already have constant physical access to the car.
Just hope Chevy will follow them in this regard. Luckily, most of the hackers who find these holes are more than happy to share their findings with the manufacturers so they can be plugged. A hacker managed to hack a 2013 Chevrolet Volt last year and they contacted GM about ti afterwards. There's always a risk but it's generally minimal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Gotta love the good guys in society. That is reassuring to hear though, I keep thinking of like ... iRobot lol, I know it's a different concept but, I manage to concoct my own fears in my head unfortunately
 

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I won't be surprised if most manufacturers have a department dedicated to finding these holes and plugging them. More worried about thieves using the keyless entry and ignition function to steal your car. They plug a defeat device into the onboard diagnostic (OBD) port and then reprogram the immobilizer module. Hoping Chevy puts a few more security measures around the port.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I won't be surprised if most manufacturers have a department dedicated to finding these holes and plugging them. More worried about thieves using the keyless entry and ignition function to steal your car. They plug a defeat device into the onboard diagnostic (OBD) port and then reprogram the immobilizer module. Hoping Chevy puts a few more security measures around the port.
I'm sure they would at this point as it's a great concern. More technology leads to more opportunities. As long as they keep updating security, Thieves will keep adapting, and it's an on-going circle of life I guess
 

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GM does have a Hackerone account: https://hackerone.com/gm

Though, all the bugs are hidden due to disclosure lockdown by I think GM. You have to have an account on Hackerone to see the actual bugs and even then, I don't think you can see other bugs, just your own and its progress during review by GM.

Honestly, I'd pull the OnStar fuse if you're really concerned. One thing I recall is most new cars are fly-by-wire systems so control of the CAN bus can disable your steerage, acceleration, even your brake pedal. However, I think the one thing that is read-only by CAN bus is the EPB. This is why I think in the manual you're supposed to pull up on the EPB switch and HOLD it up for emergency braking should the Bolt decide to accelerate on its own. Nothing can control EPB except the switch and directly pressing on the "release" button on teach EPB module (I forget where I read this, but it was during my research about how to disable the EPB should I need to tow the Gen 2 Volt which I assume has similar EPB as Bolt).
 
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