Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
  • Hey Guest, welcome to ChevyBolt.org. We encourage you to register to engage in conversations about your Bolt.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

Registered
Joined
246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been struggling with the need for a spare, and have read over the other threads, but I am loathe to use the area above for a full size or compact spare tire. I was wondering if it is possible to fit a compatible compact spare in the "spare tire well" below the storage? I have an LT and no amplifier or other gear in the well.
 

Registered
Joined
2,094 Posts
Can you measure the diameter of the well at the narrowest point?

I have a Premier so the well is filled with the sub and amp.

Here are two different compact spares people have been using for the Bolt:
FWIW- the OEM Bolt tires are 25.5" dia.

Maxxis T115/70/R16 with a 22.3" dia.
Maxxis T135/90/D16 with a 25.6" dia.
 

Registered
Joined
246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Can you measure the diameter of the well at the narrowest point?

I have a Premier so the well is filled with the sub and amp.

Here are two different compact spares people have been using for the Bolt:
FWIW- the OEM Bolt tires are 25.5" dia.

Maxxis T115/70/R16 with a 22.3" dia.
Maxxis T135/90/D16 with a 25.6" dia.

The measurement is about 20.5" at the narrowest point, so I don't think it will be possible
 

Registered
Joined
771 Posts
I came up with a 'theoretical' solution as I plan to replace the wheels and tires at the end of summer. The performance tires I plan on are not run flats like the stock tires. On my 2nd day of diving the Bolt, a bolt (literally) punctured one of the tires and stuck in it. The stock Michelin did not lose air, and I was able to get the tire patched with no issues. So I see the risk of having no spare. Like you, I want to utilize the dead space.

Here is my plan.

A.) Purchase a 15" Space Master Collapsible spare tire & wheel like this offa eBay ($100):



This one came from a Audi, but there are others from Porsche and Mercedes as well. Obviously this isn't the correct 5x105 bolt pattern needed.

B.) So I will ship the wheel/tire to a machine shop such as Jason's in Chino, CA that performs what is known as a "Fill & Drill". This process will weld close the existing holes and drill the proper bolt pattern ($100 + $60 to ship both ways).

C.) May need to jerry-rig some spacers or some mount mechanism so the wheel doesn't rattle around in the area.

D.) Will need a 12V portable high pressure (100 PSI+) air compressor ($75)



(this may be tricky as the high pressure ones often must clip to the car battery and not a cigarette lighter)

Edit: E.), D'oh...need a lug wrench jacking device as well.

I encourage you to test out my 'opensource' solution first if you so wish (at your own risk), and let us know if it works. :laugh: Otherwise wait around a couple of Months Months and I will try it myself.
 

Registered
Joined
246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I came up with a 'theoretical' solution as I plan to replace the wheels and tires at the end of summer.

Interesting idea. Living as I do on an island I am thinking of just keeping a spare in the garage as a backup. That way I could get my wife or son to bring it to me in the event of a flat. If we do go for a ride to the more remote parts of the island, I could toss the spare into the back as necessary. I am also leery of the one dealer and tire shops having a replacement in stock, so I am leaning to having a full size spare.


I will be interested to follow your progress!
 

Registered
Joined
929 Posts
The fill and drill sounds sketchy but it can be done well. I found a local guy who does 105 from 100 to 112 and has good reviews. I also thought about doing exactly what shotel says. But ended up finding a 5x105 wheel and regular tire.
 

Registered
Joined
771 Posts
The stock tires aren't "run flats".
Run-flat tire definition:
A run-flat tire is a pneumatic vehicle tire that is designed to resist the effects of deflation when punctured, and to enable the vehicle to continue to be driven...

Technologies:
1.1 Self-supporting
1.2 Self-sealing
1.3 Auxiliary-supported

1.2 Self-sealing
These tires contain an extra lining within the tire that self-seals in the event of a small hole due to a nail or screw. In this way, the loss of air is prevented from the outset such that the tire is either permanently self-repairing or at least loses air very slowly.

...The rotating force then distributes the compound onto the inner surface of the tire to act as a self-sealing lining within the tire.
When I got my stock tire patched, they showed me the inside of the tire once it was removed from the wheel to let me know it would take some extra time to work around about an inch of goo. I took it that this goo was the gelatin-like compound described above. I understand MICHELIN庐 uses its trademarked moniker Selfseal庐, but that's a brand identity unique only to MICHELIN庐.

If it's not a run flat per this definition, what is it?
 

Registered
2021 Bolt Premier
Joined
5,648 Posts
Run-flat tire definition:


When I got my stock tire patched, they showed me the inside of the tire once it was removed from the wheel to let me know it would take some extra time to work around about an inch of goo. I took it that this goo was the gelatin-like compound described above. I understand MICHELIN庐 uses its trademarked moniker Selfseal庐, but that's a brand identity unique only to MICHELIN庐.

If it's not a run flat per this definition, what is it?

I went with an actual tire manufacturer's definition, as well as the way the term has been used in high-performance cars for decades.


https://www.bridgestonetire.com/tread-and-trend/drivers-ed/run-flat-tires


We can play "battle of the dictionaries" all day. I'd rather not. :)
 

Registered
Joined
2,094 Posts
As I understand it...

Traditional "Run flat" tires are made of thicker rubber sidewalls and are thicker in the tread area. You can deflate them completely and still drive on them for a limited distance and at limited speeds. If you do drive on them deflated for any distance other than just getting off the freeway- you need to replace them.

"Self sealing" tires (as found on the Bolt) have a polymer "goo" bead on the inside throughout the whole tread area. In theory, once punctured the 40PSI or so internal pressure is sufficient to force the "goo" into/around the leak and permanently seal it.
If the "goo" works as intended- you may not even notice a puncture. "Self sealing" tires may be patched and returned to service if tire integrity has not been compromised.
 

Registered
2017 Bolt EV
Joined
10,163 Posts
Given the name, that's a bad definition, IMHO. To me, "Run flat" means "keeps on running even when it's flat" and "flat" means "no air pressure". You simply can't run a self-sealing tire if it's lost pressure.

A self-sealing tire should, I believe, be called just that: a tire that seals punctures by itself. Calling it a "run flat" just invites people to abuse it when the self-sealing function fails to work.
 

Registered
Joined
246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Went with a full size spare

Ordered a wheel and tire package at Tire Rack to keep in the garage and possibly toss in the back for more remote parts of the island. I just did a test fitting and it works well, thanks to all who listed the jacking points for the S10 jack (got mine off ebay) and other posters detailing their experiences with acquiring a spare tire. Peace of mind is a good thing.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top