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Hey everyone - one unfortunate side effect of the battery recall is that I started parking the car outside and some rodents got in and chewed up the harness that goes to the front turn signals. I got it diagnosed by the dealer who performed my recall and it looks like the parts are only $75, but they quoted $625 for them to perform the work. This seems outrageous for replacing a wire - and it doesn't looks terribly complicated as it only routes through the front bumper area. The parts below are what I'm going to need to purchase.
Has anyone replaced on of these before? I'm a manufacturing engineer with a degree in electrical engineering, so I feel like I should be able to do it as long as there's nothing crazy I'm missing. I haven't been able to find any videos of this process, so I wanted to pick this subreddit's brain before I started poking around too much. Thanks in advance!
2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV Wire Harness 42638810 | GMPartsDirect.com
Connector 13578533 | GMPartsDirect.com
 

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I'm betting you could handle that, speaking as a Manufacturing Engineer. Especially just replacing it so you remove one section at a time, replacing with new in same place. But I bet there will be a lot of "wait.. I can't remove that until I remove this other thing, which I can't remove until I remove that other thing first.. etc.", which is the reason for the $625. Service manual purchase might be in order if nobody can help with specifics.

But seeing the price of that harness really pisses me off. Coming from VW/Audi, a harness like that would probably run $200+.
 

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Are you replacing the entire harness ? Or just the plug at the lamp socket ?
IF the harness, the entire front bumper must come off. Maybe an few hours worth of
time to do it without damage, including the wire repairs. Why not turn this into your ins. co. ?

Dealers usually charge $175.00 plus per hour. 2.5 hours and 100 bucks in parts.
@ 175 an hour nets your pocket to the tune of at least 490.00 bucks with taxes.
 

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As drdiesel implies, dealers service shops have evolved to replacing components (part swapping) as their method of resolving problems. This approach is based on the statistics of successful repair (no comeback) and economics for the dealer. Business s tatistics play a large role in successful auto repair businesses. Although they may lose a few sales becaus eof the price of service, they come out ahead by having a repeatable approach that is not dependent on the skill of the worker, but the workers ability to follow directions and use standardized parts.
If it were my vehicle I would repair the existing wire/plug myself, but I have doing the most of my own automotive work since the early 70s.
 

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So, after having worked a career at at major OEM of Heavy Equipment, the OEM will have a standard rate charge book for the number of hours it takes a dealer to make a repair. Heck, we had a shop at our factory where a few techs would do some of the new jobs on a new model and standard time it out so that the dealers had a book to know when they billed warranty work back to the OEM. My experience was that the standard rates were times that were not too onerous nor not too generous---each side thought it was fair. A dealer is happy when their guys figure out how to work faster than the number of hours in the book for each job. So whatever your dealer's labor charge is---let's say $125/hour----remember that probably the mechanic is making $20/hour and then there are social charges for health care, SSN, etc----and the rest is the overhead for the facility, dealership mgmt structure, etc. So, if they quoted you $625 for the labor and they charge $125 / hour for labor, there is a standard book that says in takes 5 hours to do the job, to include all the parts to remove, etc. Often the service guys will figure out how to do stuff faster or multitask---and then the dealership makes more. The caveat is when they screw it up and there is a callback to redo it again, they're not making any money on it since they've been reimbursed for it already. I know my mechanical skills---I am definitely not as fast at my old retired age as some 20 something year old who wrenches all day, everyday. There are plenty of jobs I will undertake myself, taking my time, not breaking anything else as I attempt a repair, and methodically work at it. Yes, my time is worth something. Other times I will have a dealership or independent shop undertake the work. So, not to defend dealerships here but to say that the system is the system. Lastly, when it comes to the price of parts----well, having been in charge of purchasing all the service parts for the use for our dealer network, both warranty and non warranty, one needs to understand that there is some healthy mark ups along the supply chain from supplier to OEM to Dealer to Customer. Sorry to hear that the rats chewed through the wires---often this is due to the "push" to have OEM's make their vehicles more "green" and that means soy plastic. Rats just love that soy plastic.
 

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This seems outrageous for replacing a wire - and it doesn't looks terribly complicated as it only routes through the front bumper area.
Is this a lease? If I owned the car, I would just splice in new wire and forget about trying to replace the harness.
 

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2017 Chevy Bolt EV Premium - Metallic Grey
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(1) Access the service manual for $15 to see a step by step procedure for replacing or getting to any part...https://www.alldatadiy.com/alldatadiy/DIY~C8000~R0~OF1~N/0

(2a) Just solder the wires that were chewed through. Use wire strippers, strip the insulation back and use a soldering iron. It might be a tight fit depending on where the damage is. You could also remove the harness and repair it outside the vehicle.

(2b) If you are not comfortable soldering then use wire joiners. They basically take two ends of wires and join them back together. Then wrap the joint with weatherproof material.

(3) DO NOT GO TO THE DEALERSHIP. Find another shop that knows how to remove a bumper and fix some wires. It's the same problem that has happened on cars for all of automotive history. Some small shops could probably do it. But the dealership will always rip you off.

(Note) Dealerships use "service codes" which are predetermined hours of labor for each and every repair. It could take them 1 hour to do something but if GM's service code specifies 3 hours it will cost you 3 hours of labor. This allows GM to have a standard burden of work so that dealerships don't overcharge or undercharge and so that there is a consistent pricing across dealerships for the same repair. But because of this, it doesn't really matter how good the mechanic is or fast they fix your car, they will charge you the x hours of labor GM tells them too. So find another shop.
 
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