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Seems fair enough. I was surprised that they didn't mention that the base Model 3 has a much smaller battery and so slower 0-60 times. Also they made no mention of the Leaf's upcoming larger battery option. In addition, it's a nit to pick, but the Bolt's 1/4 mile time is effected by the fact that the Bolt is speed limited to I think around 90 mph.

I was really, really surprised that they did talk about the Leaf's small info screen and dated interior, but made no mention of Tesla's big ol' iPlank stuck on a log interior and how well they either liked, or disliked driving by touch screen. IMO, the Bolt is nice melding of the Leaf and the Tesla.

Basically though, this "shoot out" is really premature. It should be done sometime in 2019 when a Model 3 with the small battery is available and the Leaf with a bigger battery is available and the Bolt likely will have something like Super Cruise in it. (Crossing fingers!)
 

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Seems fair enough. I was surprised that they didn't mention that the base Model 3 has a much smaller battery and so slower 0-60 times. Also they made no mention of the Leaf's upcoming larger battery option. In addition, it's a nit to pick, but the Bolt's 1/4 mile time is effected by the fact that the Bolt is speed limited to I think around 90 mph.

Correct my misconceptions: 1) I thought battery size affected only range and not 0-60 time. Is the available power of the motor dependent on the size of the battery? 2) The max speed in the Bolt is 93 mph. When tested it reached 92.+ right at 1/4 mile. Did it peak and hold steady at some point before? Did it peak just after 1/4 mile was traveled? (I would have thought just after, but don't know for sure.)

Lastly (as an aside): Has anyone found a safe and legal space to experience the Bolt's top speed? Would a race track let you sign a waiver and reach 93 mph?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was really, really surprised that they did talk about the Leaf's small info screen and dated interior, but made no mention of Tesla's big ol' iPlank stuck on a log interior and how well they either liked, or disliked driving by touch screen. IMO, the Bolt is nice melding of the Leaf and the Tesla.
We all know DaV8or has issues with the Tesla design on the major center screen having all the car's controls....my humble opinion (having now spent some time in a Model 3) this is a _NON_ issue - I know DaV8or has issues, and will continue to have issues, but I'm confident this will be a minority opinion.

You're welcome not to like it, you're welcome not to buy the car for it - but for the vast majority of buyers this will _NOT_ be an issue that prevents them from being overwhelming satisfied with the car. the center screen is perfectly functional, useable, and presents no major issue with driving or using the car.

I fully understand I will not convince detractors via this post, but let's be clear - the detractors are the minority opinion, most people will view the screen as awesome, a step forward, and it's very very responsive and has best in industry infotainment

to hold out against the trend in this space is like explaining to me that the iPhoneX is doomed because it dropped touchID and the physical keyboard...you're welcome to your opinion - but I doubt it will actually be a problem for the vast majority of people.
 

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We all know DaV8or has issues with the Tesla design on the major center screen having all the car's controls....my humble opinion (having now spent some time in a Model 3) this is a _NON_ issue - I know DaV8or has issues, and will continue to have issues, but I'm confident this will be a minority opinion.

You're welcome not to like it, you're welcome not to buy the car for it - but for the vast majority of buyers this will _NOT_ be an issue that prevents them from being overwhelming satisfied with the car. the center screen is perfectly functional, useable, and presents no major issue with driving or using the car.

I fully understand I will not convince detractors via this post, but let's be clear - the detractors are the minority opinion, most people will view the screen as awesome, a step forward, and it's very very responsive and has best in industry infotainment

to hold out against the trend in this space is like explaining to me that the iPhoneX is doomed because it dropped touchID and the physical keyboard...you're welcome to your opinion - but I doubt it will actually be a problem for the vast majority of people.
I did add some personal opinion commentary about the Tesla display screen, but sadly you missed my point which was, I'm surprised it wasn't mentioned in the article and there was no review of it. If it is as you say, super awesome, a big step forward and the inevitable future, don't you think they aught to have commented on it?
 

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Correct my misconceptions: 1) I thought battery size affected only range and not 0-60 time. Is the available power of the motor dependent on the size of the battery?
In theory yes. If a battery is too small for the size of the motor, the motor will never realize it's maximum potential although I'm not sure this is the case with the Model 3. In the case of the Tesla Model 3, the upsized battery comes with a higher HP motor and I think a different gear ratio. This significantly improves it's 0 to 60 time over the standard battery. It should be noted though, that the standard battery Model 3 is still quicker and faster than both the Bolt and the Leaf. This is due to bigger motor, lower gear ratio, RWD and stickier tires. Lower drag coefficient also enables a higher top speed.
 

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After reading this review, I feel like I picked the winner.
Agree, it's just nuts to compare head-to-head but then not weight price. Give the win to the $60,500 Model 3? It only wins for those for whom cost is not a factor. How can the Tesla be worth 38% more than the Bolt Premier? With that $17,000, one could buy a 2014 i3 as a second EV.

The main thing they got right is how central one-pedal driving is to the EV experience. The lack of that feature would preclude our buying a Model 3.

jack vines
 

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Agree, it's just nuts to compare head-to-head but then not weight price. Give the win to the $60,500 Model 3? It only wins for those for whom cost is not a factor. How can the Tesla be worth 38% more than the Bolt Premier? With that $17,000, one could buy a 2014 i3 as a second EV.

The main thing they got right is how central one-pedal driving is to the EV experience. The lack of that feature would preclude our buying a Model 3.

jack vines
Yeah, that's why I say this comparison review is premature. Someday when there is actually a $36,000 Model 3 available and a Leaf that can go over 200 miles, then it makes sense.
 

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A lot of interesting info, but ...

... Different price categories "as tested", I'm afraid, which is where the utility/relevance of this "head-to-head" ends, IMO.

We don't know yet what either the "basic" Model 3 or the longer-range Nissan would be like, or how much they would cost, or, for that matter, when they would be available to an unprivileged buyer.
 

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In theory its unreasonable to compare such dissimilar models.

But if someone is considering right now what EV to buy, and might include in their consideration the Tesla despite its severe price premium, than that buyer probably is going to choose among these three models.

For me, I didn't realize the Leaf had cargo space adequate for my needs so I had never considered it before. But after seeing this comparison I will now investigate it further - illustrating the usefulness of including three somewhat similar models in one review. I admire the Tesla but for me, I don't admire it so so much that I would pay that premium price.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The only difference between the Model 3 will range and acceleration - everything else will be identical - so a 36k 4 door cayman will be pretty awesome if that’s what you want.
 

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The review does mention in passing the Leaf’s forthcoming larger battery, and the Tesla’s forthcoming smaller battery. So they didn’t completely gloss over them.

I, too, think that the Model 3’s singular screen is not for me. But it occurred to me that with AutoPilot 2, a driver is less likely to get into an accident when they look over at the screen to make some sort of adjustments or to check something (speed, Navigation, etc). Whereas in a traditional car you have controls and displays in a certain place that can be found and used without taking your eyes off of the road, or only for a moment. You have to have some sort of confidence in Tesla’s (semi) autonomous vehicle abilities to make the leap to a single display that is not right in front of your eyes normally, like with a regular car. And that is probably what Musk is counting on, and encouraging people to do: take a leap into the future.
 

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Some of you may have noticed the regeneration data from Motor Trend: Tesla-Model-3-Chevrolet-Bolt-EV-Nissan-LEAF-SL-one-pedal-wonder.jpg

However, the Bolt EV data is incorrect. MT mislabeled the Drive + Paddle data and did not include the Drive data by itself. Here's a plot I created from data that GM provided to reporters about a year ago.



The data overlaps surprisingly well, except of course the gray line that was not included by MT. The take away, that MT readers will miss, is that 1) the Bolt EV Drive mode is very similar deceleration to the Tesla Model 3 in Low Regen mode, and 2) the Bolt EV has much more flexible regen options when compared to the other cars.
 

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Yes. Until I read this article I didn’t realize the 3’s regenerative system was so weak. Even if the low priced model 3 was available, the Bolt’s vastly superior regenerative system wins me over. It’s my favourite feature making the vehicle safer and more fun. The Bolt’s dimensional smallness and utility are also big pluses for me over the 3.
 

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The only difference between the Model 3 will range and acceleration - everything else will be identical - so a 36k 4 door cayman will be pretty awesome if that’s what you want.
I think that's the point that a lot of commenters have either missed or ignored. Had the comparison been done in a few months using the base model 3 without PUP, EAP, FSD, 19" wheels, 220 mile battery, in black, the results would have been the same. It may have been a few tenths of a second slower but still faster than the rest and may have performed better in the handling department. I agree that based on the owner feedback, the single screen is a non-issue. So the decision comes down to how important are regen and storage. Regen may get tweaked with software in time, but the model 3 will never be a hatchback.
 

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I was glad to see that the 2018 Leaf uses identical tires to the Bolt. That will make them a little cheaper and easier to find. Wonder if any other cars are using the same tire.
 

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I was glad to see that the 2018 Leaf uses identical tires to the Bolt. That will make them a little cheaper and easier to find. Wonder if any other cars are using the same tire.
Also makes it handy to re-use the snow tires from my old LEAF, once I get new wheels.
 

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Yes. Until I read this article I didn’t realize the 3’s regenerative system was so weak. Even if the low priced model 3 was available, the Bolt’s vastly superior regenerative system wins me over.
Yeah, it's surprised me how much I like one-pedal driving. I was a bit ambivalent about it before I got the Bolt, but now I've come to realize that it's really one of the key features of the electric driving experience.
 
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