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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. Enjoying gathering all of this information. I am currently driving a 2016 Toyota Prius hybrid. I am very interested in purchasing a Bolt hopefully in the near future. Curious as to what the 2018 version will be.
 

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I do. Imported one from CA in April.
 
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I live in East Mesa and here's my typical work day experience in the Bolt:

Every night I charge with Hilltop Reserve on.
I get in the car with ~185 miles range showing.
I drive 36 miles (almost all highway at 75 mph) to work in the morning at 6 am.
I get to work with ~175 miles range showing.
I drive under 10 miles getting lunch most days.
My car sits in direct sunlight for over 8 hours during work and then I pre-condition it to 72 degrees for a few minutes before getting into it.
I drive 36 miles (almost all highway at 75 mph) home at 3 pm.
I get home with ~105 miles showing.

You'll notice that the range showing when I get to work is high, but the range "disappears" by the time I get home. Though the original estimate each morning is correct. That is because I burn some power preconditioning the car, plus the car has had to spend some power conditioning the battery during the day. I'm pretty sure I could drive closer to 215 miles straight at 6:30 in the morning if I choose to.
 

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Hi! I am a new AZ bolt owner as of July 12th. We have been putting our Bolt to the test by driving it up to Flagstaff every weekend. We have learned a great deal about A/C draw because of the sweltering heat, cruise control, L drive, driving speeds and elevation climb all in our trips

The A/C system is excellent but there is no question it draws on the battery. We are still trying to figure out why the mileage automatically drops 10 - 15 miles when we turn on the A/C and then bounces back when we turn it off. The car does not physically struggle with the A/C on and climbing elevation but it does chew up the miles.

Driving it up to Flagstaff with a full charge of 230 miles in 118 degree heat we used 212 miles of charge from Ahwatukee (with a regular car it is 150 miles). We were concerned with the A/C draw and the elevation climb that we wouldn't make it, so we drove at 72 mph on L and cruise control. Going down the hill without air except for the last 20 minutes we used 123 miles of charge and drove 80 mph on L and cruise control.

We starting keeping a log beginning with our 1st trip because there are so many variables that effect the range. I am sure within the year we will know what to expect but for now the learning curve is quite the challenge. Cruise control definitely helps for long distances, as for the other variables, we need some more experience!

I can say this though. The only fast charging stations were on the NAU campus and we would have had to pay a fee to use them (inside parking garages). We learned quickly the meaning of range anxiety when we pulled into our garage up north with 15 miles of charge left and no place to recharge. The Chevy dealership had a level 1 charger they graciously offered us to use but it took 15 hours to get 189 miles of charge just so we could return to Phoenix. After that weekend, we had a charging station installed into our Flag house too. We are committed to driving EV's so we figured it is part of the investment to owning one.

Hope this helps.
 

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SteveCaz: Do you mean "smuggled" one from Ca to AZ?

Whitelightning1!: 189 miles added in 15 hours (12.6 mpch {miles per charging hour}) sounds more like the 16 amp Level 2 (206 - 220 volt) chargers than many Chevy dealerships have, rather than a "level 1 charger they graciously offered...". The Level 1 EVSE included with the Bolt usually can add from 4 mpch (6 amp) to 8 mpch (12 amp). Mine never gets to >12 mpch. Still, having a Level 2 EVSE in Flagstaff was a good move. Congratulations. I also keep a log (see separate post entitled "MyLog" in "2017+ Chevy Bolt Forum > General discussion" section) for all trips over 238 miles, especially when I DCFC enroute. Keep posting your experiences.
 

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SurgeonFWW: I have my math wrong for the number of hours it was charging. We plugged in at 8 am on Sat and picked it up 9am on Sunday. The car was charging at the Chevy dealership on a 220, 16 Amp circuit used for their VOLTS.

There were 9 miles of charge left when we pulled into the parking on Saturday so we picked up 180 miles in 25 hours - (7.2 miles per hour). Isn't that's a Level 1?
 

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I'm no expert on Levels, but my understanding is that Levels are based on voltage. Voltage never changes but amperage decreases as the battery fills.

Level 2 EVSEs are 206-240 volts. A 220 volt 16 Amp EVSE is considered Level 2. Some Level 2s can start at 16, 30, 32, and 40 amps.

Level 1 designation is reserved for 110-120 volt EVSEs. The Chevy-supplied Level 1 EVSE starts at either 6 or 12 amps.

Level 3s are 350-500 Volts (only Tesla superchargers can do >400 volts) and the amperage usually starts at ~100 amps but decreases to near zero as the battery fills. Most shut off (and the cost is measured) by time, and you NEVER fill to "full". Cost effectiveness plummets after 60 minutes of "pay-for" charging. The free ones I have encountered shut off when they got down to ~ 5 amps. {The two times I filled to full at a free DCFC charger took ~ 2hr 15 min each. But I have been "near full" in 1 hr 30 min.}

If someone else thinks levels are based on initial amperage (or initial wattage, which is volts times amps), enlighten us.
 

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I'm no expert on Levels, but my understanding is that Levels are based on voltage. Voltage never changes but amperage decreases as the battery fills.

Level 2 EVSEs are 206-240 volts. A 220 volt 16 Amp EVSE is considered Level 2. Some Level 2s can start at 16, 30, 32, and 40 amps.

Level 1 designation is reserved for 110-120 volt EVSEs. The Chevy-supplied Level 1 EVSE starts at either 6 or 12 amps.

Level 3s are 350-500 Volts (only Tesla superchargers can do >400 volts) and the amperage usually starts at ~100 amps but decreases to near zero as the battery fills. Most shut off (and the cost is measured) by time, and you NEVER fill to "full". Cost effectiveness plummets after 60 minutes of "pay-for" charging. The free ones I have encountered shut off when they got down to ~ 5 amps. {The two times I filled to full at a free DCFC charger took ~ 2hr 15 min each. But I have been "near full" in 1 hr 30 min.}

If someone else thinks levels are based on initial amperage (or initial wattage, which is volts times amps), enlighten us.


Notice that both AC and DC charging have levels, so there is AC Level 1, 2 & 3 and DC level 1, 2 & 3.

The Bolt is capable of AC level 1 & 2, and those with the DCFC option are capable of DC level 1 (often incorrectly referred to as L3 charging)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
mysterjw, My commute is similar to yours. Drive 33 miles each way 25 on I-10 @ 75mph. When my wife is in the car the a/c must be on. I have a bit of a range concern with the four trips or so to get out of the heat to Jerome, Sedona, Prescott ect. How is the charging infrastructure around the state? Sounds like some of you have ventured out.
 

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My commute is 35 miles each way on the 101. I do not charge at home as I get free charging at work. Wife uses home charger for Volt. I charge to 100% each day at work 240 on the GOM(guess o meter). I work a compressed schedule 6am-6pm Sunday Monday Tuesday and every other Wednesday. I do a good amount of driving on my off days and charge again on Sunday. When I first got car GOM was as high as 325 when temp was 85 and no AC. 85 is not hot to us AZ guys ??. After full charge and round trip still have 160 or so now running AC. It is plugged in for 12 a day at work per GM recommendation for hot weather idle time.
 

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Thanks for your input. Although we have attempted to educate ourselves about the charging levels, there is still some confusion on our part. We put a 220 volt, 40 amp circuit in both houses (Clipper Creek units) but couldn't figure out why the battery only charged to 200 miles in Flagstaff saying it had a full charge. We disconnected the hose for 5 minutes and reconnected. It still read 200 miles, but also said fully charged.

In Phoenix we get a full charge (230) - so I am thinking it must have something to do with how the battery is filling in Flag. I suppose that explains why the level 2 at the Chevy dealer took so long.

Your information is so helpful!! And your car log, IMPRESSIVE!!
 

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Thanks for this info. I, too, thought DCFC WAS Level 3. Now I am better informed, but still confused.

Here is a screen from a (free) DCFC station (Combo plug) @ 42 seconds into the charge. Which Level would this fall into? I started out at 21% battery SoC. That 1 hr 16 minutes refers to the time to get to 80%, NOT 100%. It took another 60 minutes to charge to 100%. (I learned this by watching, not because I knew it at the beginning of the charging process.)

Didn't know how to resize my picture. This is my first camera picture post. Let me know how to do it better.
 

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Thanks for your input. Although we have attempted to educate ourselves about the charging levels, there is still some confusion on our part. We put a 220 volt, 40 amp circuit in both houses (Clipper Creek units) but couldn't figure out why the battery only charged to 200 miles in Flagstaff saying it had a full charge. We disconnected the hose for 5 minutes and reconnected. It still read 200 miles, but also said fully charged.

In Phoenix we get a full charge (230) - so I am thinking it must have something to do with how the battery is filling in Flag. I suppose that explains why the level 2 at the Chevy dealer took so long.

Your information is so helpful!! And your car log, IMPRESSIVE!!
The range number is an estimate based on recent driving behavior/conditions. Phoenix to Flagstaff involves an elevation gain of about 5900 feet and that hurts efficiency, so the estimated range will decrease based on that recent data.

The available range on a full battery is not a set number, but will vary based on recent driving habits (and other factors such as ambient and battery temps).

The most shocking example of this I've seen is a Fit EV owner in the Northeast that parked outside (and plugged in) in the winter. It was something like -20 F overnight, and when he got in the car in the morning, the estimated range on a full charge was 0 (yes, zero). The Fit is only rated at 82 miles EPA, and is known for poor cold weather performance. Combine that with an ultra-conservative guess-o-meter and that is the result.

Don't worry too much about the range number at a full charge changing. It is completely normal and does not indicate a problem with charging the battery.
 

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DucRider -Thanks for the explanation of the charging/range number being based on recent driving behavior/driving conditions. I did not understand the available range on a full battery is not a set number either. I thought it had to show 230 to be fully charged.

Your SAE chart was helpful too. Good to know the Bolt can only use a DC Level 1 charger.

Can you explain the loud noise we hear (sometimes) when it is charging (at our house)?
 

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Your SAE chart was helpful too. Good to know the Bolt can only use a DC Level 1 charger.

Can you explain the loud noise we hear (sometimes) when it is charging (at our house)?
I had a typo/mistake in that post - L2 DCFC is 36 to 90 kW and the Bolt will do (on paper) 80 kW. It routinely exceeds the 36 kW of L1 DCFC.

The noise is the cooling system(s) for the battery and/or inverter/charger in the car. Also completely normal.
 

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Does PlugShare contribute to this confusion? See Blacksburg VA (Municipal Building) which states: "One Level 3 dual-standard Signet 50-kW DCFC on the Draper Road side of the Town Hall ..." According to SAE, this is a DC Level 2 station (and a "low kW" one at that).
 

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DucRider -Thanks for the explanation of the charging/range number being based on recent driving behavior/driving conditions. I did not understand the available range on a full battery is not a set number either. I thought it had to show 230 to be fully charged.
The vertical green bar graph on the left side behind the range display is what tells you the battery's state of charge. If all 20 bars are lit then the battery is fully charged.
 
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