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The cord is not a trip hazard with my system. It hugs the walls with some clips and I only do it during the night. Since I leave for work at 5am it is not an issue at all.

No I cannot and will not pay for it 100%. If I move I cannot take that loss. Sry. 50/50 is my only offer.

Good point with the limitations of the age of the house and the electric system. Will look into that.
That's what you say. There must be a section of cord from the wall to your car, unless your car is parked right against the wall. You don't use it day time, but for sure you are plugging in during the night. People don't see well at night and they don't expect a cord on the walk way. If I were the landlord, I wouldn't allow it, as I will be on the hook if someone trips and sue me over it. I will turn around and sue you as you do it against my warnings.

I understand it is a hassle, but is DCFC an option?

-TL

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Discussion Starter #22
Well I do park my car right outside my door and pretty much next to the wall. About a foot and a half from the wall. So again, tripping is not an issue.

Zoomzoom I do not know what words you’re using that needs to be censored but, with respect, if it’s not going to be polite and helpful....you may want to re-word it to be so please.

if it is possible to do the work my landlord would be a fool to not realize that evs in my area are growing. We are seeing more and more Teslas, Bolts, Soul EVs, and other ev and hybrids. It is good to see this. This will increase the value of the property and if I leave he can put that as an improvement to the apartment. Hydro is NOT included in his rent. I pay that so that’s my responsibility....not his.

what is a nema 5-15?
 

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Can you provide a diagram of your place? Would be easier to help you come up with low cost ideas. From your verbal description, seems you might consider running a line from inside your unit to the outside and down the outside wall, maybe add a switch to that line.. This way, you can energize the line only when you need to use it - and, of course, that power use is charged to your own meter. But, as others have said, I don't think the landlord would be interested paying any part of the set up if he's not going to be able to recoup the cost within a year.
 

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Nope. Cannot afford to install a DCFC charger. They are WAY more expensive and the electric work would be more expensive.
Not install a DCFC. Use a DCFC on the regular for charging.

NEMA 5-15 is a standard North American 120V wall connector. Personally I'd disagree with this approach as it's just as simple to install a 240V receptacle as it is to install a 120V one.

ga2500ev
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Not install a DCFC. Use a DCFC on the regular for charging.

NEMA 5-15 is a standard North American 120V wall connector. Personally I'd disagree with this approach as it's just as simple to install a 240V receptacle as it is to install a 120V one.

ga2500ev
Heh I misunderstood. The nearest DCFC stations are 45 minutes away in Owen Sound, Ontario sadly.

Can you provide a diagram of your place? Would be easier to help you come up with low cost ideas. From your verbal description, seems you might consider running a line from inside your unit to the outside and down the outside wall, maybe add a switch to that line.. This way, you can energize the line only when you need to use it - and, of course, that power use is charged to your own meter. But, as others have said, I don't think the landlord would be interested paying any part of the set up if he's not going to be able to recoup the cost within a year.
I will try tomorrow and draft one up using the great of all programs.... MS PAINT. You have been warned. LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Zoomzoom I do not know what words you’re using that needs to be censored but, with respect, if it’s not going to be polite and helpful....you may want to re-word it to be so please.
The word that was censored twice was 'd - a - m - n'. They weren't used towards you at all.
 

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Reading through older posts, I have to agree that the old house is probably not a good place to add EV charging. Charging your EV and running another appliance in the kitchen may cause overload/overheating and if I were the landlord, I would make sure my tenants are not charging their EVs. Extending the wiring another 100 ft, I hope you're charging at 8A. To do what you want, you may really need to upgrade the panel, which would be cost prohibitive for both you and the landlord. Just curious, what is the size of the main breaker in your bedroom? Can you post a picture of it?

I agree with Colt that the best solution may be to move to a place that does offer EV charging.
 

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Landlord will probably not be interested but here's a cheaper option. At this price, the landlord may have a small chance to make a profit.

Ummm, you clearly didn’t actually read the link you posted. The actual cost of the charger is $500 and to address your comment about making a profit .... they charge $2000 for the retail payment option. So it’s $2500 out the door before the electrician hooks it up, and it’s a preorder. Rolling out in Europe next year so you’re going to have to add the cost of moving his apartment to Europe.
 

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Ummm, you clearly didn’t actually read the link you posted. The actual cost of the charger is $500 and to address your comment about making a profit .... they charge $2000 for the retail payment option. So it’s $2500 out the door before the electrician hooks it up, and it’s a preorder. Rolling out in Europe next year so you’re going to have to add the cost of moving his apartment to Europe.
You obviously have no business sense and do not understand the concept of trade. If the landlord is serious about attracting EV owners, one charge port will not do it. Anything that can be sold in Europe can be modified to work in US/Canada and sold.
 

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You obviously have no business sense and do not understand the concept of trade. If the landlord is serious about attracting EV owners, one charge port will not do it. Anything that can be sold in Europe can be modified to work in US/Canada and sold.
I’m not really going to go back and forth and debate your stupidity. You said you had a cheaper solution. How you think $2500 + installation costs is cheaper than what the OP suggested is beyond me. On top of the fact that you are proposing a solution that is years away from being sold in his country or ours. And then the landlord charges him for the use of it to make a profit? This is not the dumbest solution you have proposed but it is a top 10. I usually ignore you but you get a medal for this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Whoa guys....let’s not get into an argument here okay? Thanks.

Moving is not an option. The rent is incredibly cheap here. $550Cdn a month for a two bedroom is extremely rare. You cannot find anything lower. I charge at 12 amp and it does perfectly fine and does not get that warm at all as the kitchen is split into 2 circuits.

29755
 

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1. Cost of charging: $1500/year ($125/mo)
Assumptions: 25,000 miles/year, $0.20/kWh times 60 kW battery times 125 full charges.

2. Cost of installation: $2500 to $3500
Assumptions: Upgrade from 125A to 200A service requires full panel replacement and possibly has other code upgrades tied to it. Long interior/exterior routing of 6GA wiring to 50A subpanel and NEMA 14-50. Get a quote.

Ontario no longer has a home charger rebate.
 

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I would look for non-EVSE applications that the landlord might recognize for the new outlet. And I would consider settling for a L1 EVSE rather than 240V L2, because I think there are many more applications for 120V than for 240V outlets.

Looks like you don't have A/C, correct? I live in a 100-yr-old house in the southern U.S. Here in the U.S., I believe there is a common code requirement that A/C units must have a 120V "service outlet" located within a reasonable distance, to facilitate service work on the A/C unit. I could imagine that your landlord might like to have a 120V outlet on the outside wall to use for pressure washing, or paint sprayers, etc.

Also, it appears your 240V water heater is in the basement. Is that convenient to access? Given that you don't really have the spare capacity in your service panel, you could consider putting a switch on the water heater and plugging in a L2 charger there. Or you might consider doing what I did - I replaced my electric resistance water heater with a "heat pump" (HP) water heater. I did it primarily to save money - about $20/month on my utility bill. Heat pump water heaters are about twice as efficient as electrical resistance heaters. I haven't checked, but I expect that the power/amperage requirements for HP water heaters are lower than for the more common resistance heaters. It's possible this could leave you with spare capacity on the water heater branch to run your EVSE - especially if it were a 16A EVSE. The problem with HP water heaters is they are more expensive than standard resistance type - probably around US$1200 vs US$500. But that is probably cheaper than running a new branch off your service panel, and certainly cheaper than upgrading the panel to 200A service. And I'm saving around $200-250/yr on my electrical bill.

In my house, I have an unfinished cellar under the house, with a few vents around the cellar walls which exit just above ground level. I added a 120V outlet to an existing electrical branch (for cellar lights) on the ceiling of the cellar near one of those vents, and plugged the OEM L1 EVSE into that outlet, running the charge cord out the vent. I've also used the 120V outlet several times for running a saw, to vacuum my car, Christmas lights, etc.

My guess is your landlord would be more interested in those other general applications for an extra outlet. For all he knows, you'll be gone next year and it will be 10 years before anyone else has any use for a 240V outlet at that location.

Many old houses get upgraded to 200A service (very expensive) when A/C is added to the house.
 

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Whoa guys....let’s not get into an argument here okay? Thanks.

Moving is not an option. The rent is incredibly cheap here. $550Cdn a month for a two bedroom is extremely rare. You cannot find anything lower. I charge at 12 amp and it does perfectly fine and does not get that warm at all as the kitchen is split into 2 circuits.

View attachment 29755
Interesting panel, it suggests some alternate negotiation strategies.

YouLandlord
Current position in the gameEnjoy C$1000 monthly benefit from lower rent. (Compared to rentals.ca in a 40 minute radius from Owen Sound. Average rent is C$1692 over 10 rentals on the site. You are >4 standard deviations below the mean. That is winning the lottery if you like the apartment!)

Inconvenience cost of running a 120V cord (C$ ?)
Willing to pay 1/2 of install costs ($C ?)
Has invested in energy subsidized projects. (Two breakers labeled 'splits'. These units may have provided a C$2000 subsidy under the Canadian Energy Savings Rebate Program. See Link.)

Losses from renting at below average rate (C$1000?)

Observations
  • It seems you are already ahead of the game, yet want even a little more. If you are saving C$1000 a month you could buy a 6kW generator from Canadian Tire, modify the stock EVSE to 240 (see this forum) and pay it off in one month.
    • Second thought. Would the landlord install a transfer switch if you provide your generator? While you are running a transfer line, you could add an outdoor socket... It helps the property.
  • The landlord is not as old-fashioned as the panel suggests. Why did they change to splits? The landlord could have remained with the former heating system (oil? steam?) and patched it up. For an owner offering below-market rent, there appear to be other motives for the property. Is the Canadian rebate one of them? Is there a TCO total cost of ownership argument? Or is it just wanting to avoid tenant calls for repairs?
  • Does the property have natural gas? If so, there is another C$1000 rebate available for condensing tankless water heaters. This leaves a water heater circuit unused. Is there a trade here? A tankless heater eliminates basement floods and eliminates many tenant complaints about insufficient hot water.
Remember, you seem to happy with the stock charger, or could be very happy considering your options in the rental market.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Interesting panel, it suggests some alternate negotiation strategies.

YouLandlord
Current position in the gameEnjoy C$1000 monthly benefit from lower rent. (Compared to rentals.ca in a 40 minute radius from Owen Sound. Average rent is C$1692 over 10 rentals on the site. You are >4 standard deviations below the mean. That is winning the lottery if you like the apartment!)

Inconvenience cost of running a 120V cord (C$ ?)
Willing to pay 1/2 of install costs ($C ?)
Has invested in energy subsidized projects. (Two breakers labeled 'splits'. These units may have provided a C$2000 subsidy under the Canadian Energy Savings Rebate Program. See Link.)

Losses from renting at below average rate (C$1000?)

Observations
  • It seems you are already ahead of the game, yet want even a little more. If you are saving C$1000 a month you could buy a 6kW generator from Canadian Tire, modify the stock EVSE to 240 (see this forum) and pay it off in one month.
    • Second thought. Would the landlord install a transfer switch if you provide your generator? While you are running a transfer line, you could add an outdoor socket... It helps the property.
  • The landlord is not as old-fashioned as the panel suggests. Why did they change to splits? The landlord could have remained with the former heating system (oil? steam?) and patched it up. For an owner offering below-market rent, there appear to be other motives for the property. Is the Canadian rebate one of them? Is there a TCO total cost of ownership argument? Or is it just wanting to avoid tenant calls for repairs?
  • Does the property have natural gas? If so, there is another C$1000 rebate available for condensing tankless water heaters. This leaves a water heater circuit unused. Is there a trade here? A tankless heater eliminates basement floods and eliminates many tenant complaints about insufficient hot water.
Remember, you seem to happy with the stock charger, or could be very happy considering your options in the rental market.

Good luck.
I have no access to the water heater. There is no basement that I am aware of either....heck I do not even have access to a THERMOSTAT. LOL!!!! Only the business underneath me has access to those....which is no fun in the spring when it is heating up....and the older folk downstairs think that "it's still chilly" and cranks the gas furnace up.....then I have to tell them to turn it down because I am sweating. Ugh.

That aside, you do bring up some points I have not considered. The gas generator is a no go. The landlord was FORCED apparently to upgrade from fuses to breakers in the past due to a Fire and Safety Law in Ontario. I will bring up the other points to him. I would be happy if I can get one of those modded cords for my EVSE that came with my car and use whatever plug THAT uses.

The "Blank" room next to wear I park is a locked storage room that I have absolutely no access to. Landlord only. I have a feeling that is my "golden nugget" so to speak. I ALWAYS trust my gut instinct....and it is usually always right.
 
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