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Sorry new here! Just bought my Bolt today. I have a question on a home charger. I have a 220V 50 Amp outlet. Which type/size charger would I be able to use? What about the one that comes with the car? Thanks!
 

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Do you know what type of plug you have? Is it a nema 14-50?

The bolt will at most charge at 32 amps so (future-proofing aside) any charger capable of charging at 220v at or above 32amps will max out the bolt's charge rate.
I just bought the clipper creek amazingE FAST, but my requirements were a bit unusual in the sense that my plug is outdoors and I wanted something I could install permanently, as well as travel with it.
If your plug is in the garage or elsewhere protected from the elements and waterproofing is not an issue, there are other portable chargers that are cheaper available on amazon and other sides.

Some of the chargers that came with the Bolt can be used at 220V. You'll double the charge rate compared to a 110v plug, but you'll have to invest some money, or time buying or building an adapter that takes you from the normal plug to whatever plug you have on your 240v outlet. Personally I decided to stick to using the OEM charger with 110v.
 

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I LOVE my inexpensive (non-WiFi) Siemens VersiCharge! It is only 30 amps, but who cares if your EV charges to 100% overnight in 9.9 hours instead of 9.5 hours. I have never found a disadvantage to 30 amp charging (at home). On the road, I rarely use AC Level 2 charging unless I AM staying overnight. So even there, it does not matter. I often get a text from my Bolt EV at 5 am saying she is "full". The plugged VersiCharge (portable) usually comes with a NEMA 6-50 plug, but, again, at home, I just installed a different, equally-priced outlet. For travel, I made an 8' extension cable with a NEMA 14-50 plug and a (weatherproof) NEMA 6-50 outlet. Every RV park and KoA Kampground has dozens of NEMA 14-50 outlets.
 

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What about the one that comes with the car?
Depends how much you drive daily. I'm retired and no longer have a commute. So I only drive about 150 miles/week. The one that comes with the car using an adapter to 240V works just fine. Never bothered with getting another charge cord. If you're handy and familiar with electrical work, you can make your own from parts from a hardware store. There's several sources for adapters. One source is my240, where you buy two adapters. Buy the generic one that converts the Bolt's charge cord to a 6-20 plug. Then you buy the other adapter that goes from the 6-20 to what ever you need for your application.
 

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When I was looking for a charger, I narrowed my search to one made in the US with a good warranty. I chose Clipper Creek only because it had a way to wrap the cord around the unit and came with a holster for the plug that connects to the car. The E-fast looks like a good unit but you might want to get the "wall mount cable wire wrap" accessory and the holster for the plug. FWIW I've had my CC for 18 months with no problems.
 

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I LOVE my inexpensive (non-WiFi) Siemens VersiCharge! It is only 30 amps, but who cares if your EV charges to 100% overnight in 9.9 hours instead of 9.5 hours. I have never found a disadvantage to 30 amp charging (at home). On the road, I rarely use AC Level 2 charging unless I AM staying overnight. So even there, it does not matter. I often get a text from my Bolt EV at 5 am saying she is "full". The plugged VersiCharge (portable) usually comes with a NEMA 6-50 plug, but, again, at home, I just installed a different, equally-priced outlet. For travel, I made an 8' extension cable with a NEMA 14-50 plug and a (weatherproof) NEMA 6-50 outlet. Every RV park and KoA Kampground has dozens of NEMA 14-50 outlets.
I agree, I am worse than you though, I am still using my first Voltec charger from my 2012 Volt, Only puts out 3.6 so really slow. But like you said it works fine for overnight charging. It was replaced once in the first year but this has lasted.
 

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Looks like that Clipper E Fast will do for me.
Before you buy it you should really try the recommendation of XJ12 and Jim to use the supplied EVSE with an adapter. You have a vehicle with 200+ miles of range. The number of days a year that you'll exhaust 200 miles locally and need a 32A fast recharge is likely close to zero. And in that situation if there are any fast chargers locally, it would better serve that unusual situation.

You already have the most critical component, the 240V AC line. With an adapter, the OEM EVSE will give you 2.9 kW charging rate, which will recover 90 miles of range in an 8 hour period.

My opinion is that new EV users feel compelled to have max speed charging at home without being clear on the real world implications. As the owner of a much lower range EV, I can tell you there are few, if any times, that max speed charging at home is really necessary. So unless you are getting like a $400 rebate on a $450 unit, or in a situation where overnight charging cost like 2 cents a kWh, working with the EVSE that you've already paid for is a much more sensible option.

ga2500ev
 

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Before you buy it you should really try the recommendation of XJ12 and Jim to use the supplied EVSE with an adapter. You have a vehicle with 200+ miles of range. The number of days a year that you'll exhaust 200 miles locally and need a 32A fast recharge is likely close to zero. And in that situation if there are any fast chargers locally, it would better serve that unusual situation.

You already have the most critical component, the 240V AC line. With an adapter, the OEM EVSE will give you 2.9 kW charging rate, which will recover 90 miles of range in an 8 hour period.

My opinion is that new EV users feel compelled to have max speed charging at home without being clear on the real world implications. As the owner of a much lower range EV, I can tell you there are few, if any times, that max speed charging at home is really necessary. So unless you are getting like a $400 rebate on a $450 unit, or in a situation where overnight charging cost like 2 cents a kWh, working with the EVSE that you've already paid for is a much more sensible option.

ga2500ev
Agreed. 9 weeks in and the supplied L1 has met my needs. I have also used the L2 chargers at dealers (thanks Plugshare) when in the city and 1 L3 at a dealer. In the market for a Tesla Tap or similar adapter to use their destination chargers.
 
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