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Discussion Starter #1
I am freaking out. I'm going to pick up my brand new Bolt EV and I need help with what charger I should buy that best fits my needs. I drive about 40 to 50 miles per day and I don't know if the included charger will be enough to last even for a week. I read that it takes two days to charge while it is going down to empty. Help!
 

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While the charger costs less, you need an adapter to use it with the Bolt, but the Tesla Wall charger gives you the ability to go up to 80A and should you add a Tesla to your stable you would want to have the faster and higher amperage capabilities of this charger, including the ability to share a single breaker across multiple chargers (up to 4). The bad news is that you need a $250 adapter from Tesla plug to J1772 (on eBay and maybe from one other source). The Tesla wall unit is only $500. Because I plan to add a Tesla to my Bolt, I wanted the higher amperage ability of the Tesla charger. You could also buy their mobile unit and have it with you for up to a 40A load.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
While the charger costs less, you need an adapter to use it with the Bolt, but the Tesla Wall charger gives you the ability to go up to 80A and should you add a Tesla to your stable you would want to have the faster and higher amperage capabilities of this charger, including the ability to share a single breaker across multiple chargers (up to 4). The bad news is that you need a $250 adapter from Tesla plug to J1772 (on eBay and maybe from one other source). The Tesla wall unit is only $500. Because I plan to add a Tesla to my Bolt, I wanted the higher amperage ability of the Tesla charger. You could also buy their mobile unit and have it with you for up to a 40A load.
What can I buy to charge the Bolt as fast as possible without having someone wire or reword our home to put in a 240v outlet? Does that even exist? 120v just isn't gonna cut it.
 

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You must have a 240v outlet at a minimum and preferably at least 50A circuit and wiring. Otherwise you will be waiting a long time for a charged vehicle. The first night I drove our Bolt home from the dealership about 60 miles away and plugged in the 120V charger, even setting to the 12A position I was shocked when it said it would be fully charged in two days. I went into panic mode and ordered the first 240V charger I could get from Amazon overnight (a Nissan 32A 7.7KW charger) and had an electrician friend help me wire in a 240V outlet. I later returned the Nissan charger after realizing that it would not be adequate once I added the Tesla to my stable. None of this matches the performance of a fast DC charger but they are too costly for home use.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You must have a 240v outlet at a minimum and preferably at least 50A circuit and wiring. Otherwise you will be waiting a long time for a charged vehicle. The first night I drove our Bolt home from the dealership about 60 miles away and plugged in the 120V charger, even setting to the 12A position I was shocked when it said it would be fully charged in two days. I went into panic mode and ordered the first 240V charger I could get from Amazon overnight (a Nissan 32A 7.7KW charger) and had an electrician friend help me wire in a 240V outlet. I later returned the Nissan charger after realizing that it would not be adequate once I added the Tesla to my stable. None of this matches the performance of a fast DC charger but they are too costly for home use.
That's exactly why I'm freaking out. I have to charge it for days now.
 

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you need a 240v circuit - after that pretty much any charger will do - I would recommend a minimum of 24 amps (charge rate) 30 amp circuit - if possible 40/50 amp circuit and matching charger is what you want to shoot for.

with 32 amps charge rate (40 amp circuit) the maximum charge time for a Bolt is 9 hours - from zero to full.
 

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40-50 miles a day - assuming level terrain and 50-60 mph - should be 10-15 kWh usage/day.


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120 volts * 12 amps = 1,440 watts (plugged into a normal household outlet)

15,000 watt/hours (15 kWh) / 1440 watts = 10.41 (round up to 12) hour charge with the included L1 charger plugged into a normal household outlet

a 24 amp 240 volt charger (30 amp circuit)

24 * 240 = 5,760 watts

15,000 Wh / 5,760 = 2.604 (round up to 3.5) hour charge if you get an L2 charger on a 240 volt circuit

a 32 amp 240 volt charger (40 amp circuit)

32 amp * 240 volts = 7,680 watts

15,000 Wh / 7,680 watts = 1.953 hours (round up to 2.5) hour charge if you get an L2 32 amp charger on a 240 volt circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
40-50 miles a day - assuming level terrain and 50-60 mph - should be 10-15 kWh usage/day.


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120 volts * 12 amps = 1,440 watts (plugged into a normal household outlet)

15,000 watt/hours (15 kWh) / 1440 watts = 10.41 (round up to 12) hour charge with the included L1 charger plugged into a normal household outlet

a 24 amp 240 volt charger (30 amp circuit)

24 * 240 = 5,760 watts

15,000 Wh / 5,760 = 2.604 (round up to 3.5) hour charge if you get an L2 charger on a 240 volt circuit

a 32 amp 240 volt charger (40 amp circuit)

32 amp * 240 volts = 7,680 watts

15,000 Wh / 7,680 watts = 1.953 hours (round up to 2.5) hour charge if you get an L2 32 amp charger on a 240 volt circuit.
What would each one of those cost me if our electric company charges us .13111 kwh
 

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Approximately 15 kWh * .1311 = $1.96 - probably about $2.25

If you use 10 kWh it would be $1.31 or about $1.50

Hours of charge don't matter - it's kWH returned to the battery - you are billed by KWh

All of the charge scenarios I laid out lead to the same number of kWh...

Think of kWh hours as gallons of water

Different amp/volt ratings are different amounts of water being deliver...but you still need to fill the bucket to 15 gallons...

A trickle of water will take longer than a gushing hose - but both will deliver 15 gallons - your not billed by how long it takes - you are billed by how many gallons you use.

Household plug = trickle of water to fill the bucket
32 amps @ 240 volts = gushing hose

One fills the 15 kWh bucket faster than the other, but it's the same amount of water/power

Gallons = kWh

$2.00 a day for 50 miles = $0.04/mile

If you drove a gas car @ 28 mpg you would use 1.78 gallons of gas for 50 miles
1.78 gallons of gas at $2.543/gallon = $4.53 - or $0.0906/mile
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Approximately 15 kWh * .1311 = $1.96 - probably about $2.25

If you use 10 kWh it would be $1.31 or about $1.50

Hours of charge don't matter - it's kWH returned to the battery - you are billed by KWh

All of the charge scenarios I laid out lead to the same number of kWh...

Think of kWh hours as gallons of water

Different amp/volt ratings are different amounts of water being deliver...but you still need to fill the bucket to 15 gallons...

A trickle of water will take longer than a gushing hose - but both will deliver 15 gallons - your not billed by how long it takes - you are billed by how many gallons you use.

Household plug = trickle of water to fill the bucket
32 amps @ 240 volts = gushing hose

One fills the 15 kWh bucket faster than the other, but it's the same amount of water/power

Gallons = kWh
I need to know exactly how to go with this option: a 32 amp 240 volt charger (40 amp circuit)

Or am I safe to go with this one:
a 24 amp 240 volt charger (30 amp circuit)

I drive approx 10k miles per year.
 

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I need to know exactly how to go with this option: a 32 amp 240 volt charger (40 amp circuit)

Or am I safe to go with this one:
a 24 amp 240 volt charger (30 amp circuit)

I drive approx 10k miles per year.
40 amp circuit charger can fill the Bolt from zero to full in about 9 hours
32 amp circuit charger can fill the Bolt from zero to full in about 12 hours

If the cost difference is minimal get the 40 amp one.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
40 amp circuit charger can fill the Bolt from zero to full in about 9 hours
32 amp circuit charger can fill the Bolt from zero to full in about 12 hours

If the cost difference is minimal get the 40 amp one.
Could you help me understand exactly what I need to buy other than the 240v outlet that needs to get installed. Are there any other faster charging options?
 

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10,000 miles a year @ 4 mile/kWh = 2500 kWh approximate use (a lot will depend on if you get 3 miles per kWh or, 4, or 5 miles per kWh - but lets go with 4 miles per kWh - the Bolt pretty easily does that)

2500 kWh @ .1311 kWh = $327.75 in electrical charges - add 10% for charging lost so about $360 in electricity/year

2500 kWh = 2,500,000 watts/year for 10,000 miles

2,500,000 watts at 32 amp charge rate means you'll spend approximately 325.52 hours charging the car across the course of the year - probably more like 360 hours given charging loss
2,500,000 watts at 24 amp charge rate means you'll spend approximately 434.02 hours charging the car across the course of the year - probably more like 480 hours given charging loss

360 hours = 15 days of charging
480 hours = 20 days of charging

360 hours of charging per year = about .98 hours day on average
480 hours of charging per year = about 1.315 hours day on average
 

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Hi I commute about 65 miles a day and when I first bought my Bolt I had to resort to finding a nearby L2 free public charger while I researched and purchased a home unit. It took about a week. Fortunately ithere was a public charger nearby which was just a couple blocks from my office. You might try to find something just to cover you for first couple weeks. I ended up getting a non wifi Juicebox charger with a plug so I could take it with me or sell it later if I wanted to upgrade later.
 

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Could you help me understand exactly what I need to buy other than the 240v outlet that needs to get installed. Are there any other faster charging options?
you need to have a licensed and professional electrician install a 240 Volt 40 amp circuit (or 30 amp circuit your choice)

after they install the circuit which will require a permit, wire and some electrical junction boxes you need to purchase a 240 volt car charger

here are several choices for car chargers:

https://store.clippercreek.com/residential/hcs-40-hcs-40p-ev-charging-station
https://store.clippercreek.com/residential/lcs-30-24-amp-ev-charging-station
https://emotorwerks.com/store/residential/juicebox-pro-40-smart-40-amp-evse-with-24-foot-cable
https://www.chargepoint.com/products/home/order/

the electrician will install the charger using the circuit you had them install - the electrician has to have the wire/breaker/charger all match

if you buy a 40 amp charging unit - the electrician will need to install a 40 amp circuit
if you buy a 32 amp charging unit - the electrician will need to install a 32 amp circuit

the electrician will have pull wire from your electrical box to where you plan to park you car overnight to charge it

the father away your main electrical box is from your garage - the more this will cost due to the cost of wire.

you will need to get a bid from an electrician on the cost to add a new 240 volt circuit to your existing electrical system, pull wire, install a junction box, and then wire the car charger to the new circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
you need to have a licensed and professional electrician install a 240 Volt 40 amp circuit (or 30 amp circuit your choice)

after they install the circuit which will require a permit, wire and some electrical junction boxes you need to purchase a 240 volt car charger

here are several choices for car chargers:

https://store.clippercreek.com/residential/hcs-40-hcs-40p-ev-charging-station
https://store.clippercreek.com/residential/lcs-30-24-amp-ev-charging-station
https://emotorwerks.com/store/residential/juicebox-pro-40-smart-40-amp-evse-with-24-foot-cable
https://www.chargepoint.com/products/home/order/

the electrician will install the charger using the circuit you had them install - the electrician has to have the wire/breaker/charger all match

if you buy a 40 amp charging unit - the electrician will need to install a 40 amp circuit
if you buy a 32 amp charging unit - the electrician will need to install a 32 amp circuit

the electrician will have pull wire from your electrical box to where you plan to park you car overnight to charge it

the father away your main electrical box is from your garage - the more this will cost due to the cost of wire.

you will need to get a bid from an electrician on the cost to add a new 240 volt circuit to your existing electrical system, pull wire, install a junction box, and then wire the car charger to the new circuit.
Luckily I haven't picked up the car yet. A few bids came in at $1,300-$1750. Wow! Plus the cost of the charger.

On top of that here's what I am uncertain about. 1. This is a first year Bolt EV, it doesn't have proven long term reliability. 2. If parts will be easily available for it. 3. If I get hit how safe is it in each angle.
 

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Could you help me understand exactly what I need to buy other than the 240v outlet that needs to get installed. Are there any other faster charging options?
no there is nothing you can do without installing a 240 volt circuit - unless you want to use public chargers close to work or house.

there are two types of chargers

L2 chargers - typically 208 volts @ 30 amps
DCFast charger - 400 volts/150 amps - these are commercial installs typically at strip malls, car dealers, and other useful road tripping locations.

DCFast chargers will charge the car from zero to full in about 1 to 1.5 hours - but you would have to park next to a DCFast charger

L2 chargers (like charge point or blink) will take over 12 hours to fully charge the bolt.

The best solution is to charge at home, which requires you to install a new 240 volt circuit.

you have three choices:

1. install a new 240 Volt circuit at your home so you can charge over night
2. use the charger that comes with the car and suffer the long duration charge sessions
3. use public charging infrastructure near your home or work to charge the car (L2 or DCFAst)

you can use the app plug-share to look for chargers near your home/work locations - most public chargers will take a couple of hours to charge the Bolt for daily use, or several hours (10-12) to charge the Bolt if it's close to empty.
 
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