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If GM botches the High Voltage Battery Recall is it Your last GM Vehicle?

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This is the equivalent of a poorly designed engine or transmission to me, something to look at in the context of other issues. Telsa nerfed their charging rate for a simlar issue. I don't expect perfection, I expect progress.
 

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#1 - couldn't care less.
#2 - three years into the 12V battery - still going strong. And I expect it to last much longer. The Motorcraft battery in my 1988 Ranger lasted 8 years. I don't recall changing the OEM battery in my 2005 F-150 in the 7 1/2 years and 120,000 miles that I owned it.
#3 - this is a big deal. I'm rethinking whether I want to jump into another EV in the short term. Battery tech still needs a lot of work, do I want to drop $50K+ on a vehicle who's biggest cogwheel is something that will be outdated in 3 years?
Longer the "final solution" takes to appear the less optimistic I am that there is a fix that restores the original capability of the vehicle. Like GM is evaluating what is the least bad of all the alternatives.
 
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The more I think about it, the more I'm curious whether a similar poll was ever posted on the Hyundai Kona Electric forums. :unsure:

Two of the issues are, let's be honest here, nonissues. I know far more Tesla owners who have complained about their 12 V batteries failing prematurely and having to be replaced multiple times, yet I've never heard one of them say it would influence their decision to buy another Tesla.

The internet speed is another funny one, given I have a last generation Google phone, and its data and internet are slower than the Bolt EV's when used in my primary locations. As I've noted, the data speeds are enough to run video games, stream videos, and work remotely (Remote Desktop, Zoom, etc.). Is it as fast as a dedicated ISP? No, but it's technically a mobile device. Many cars still don't even offer a Wi-Fi hotspot, but again, I don't hear people say that they wouldn't consider another vehicle from that automaker.

So really, if we get to the crux of this poll, there is really the only legitimate issue here: How will GM handle the battery recall? First, we must remember that we all have various iterations of a first-generation battery from LG. GM gave LG the specifications, and LG was offering an off-the-shelf battery solution that met those specification. So it's really not even GM's battery. An argument could be made that the 2020 Bolt EV's battery is much more of a GM battery, but it's not part of this recall. So who are we really upset with here? Who are Hyundai Kona Electric owners upset with? Hyundai or LG?

Second, we haven't even given GM a chance to provide a solution. They themselves said the solution would be available in 2021. We're only 10 days into 2021, folks. The patch was meant to mitigate what was already an extremely low fire risk. Could they be more transparent about the process of troubleshooting? Sure, but would you rather get information quickly or accurately?

Essentially, what I see is a lot of people who were already turned off of the Bolt EV for various reasons using this as a justification to move on. Maybe they hated GM, but it was the only EV they could afford at the time that could meet their day-to-day requirements. Maybe they wanted a different format vehicle that wasn't available as an EV then, but is or will be soon. Maybe there are some capabilities, features, and functions that have come out in subsequent EVs that these folk would rather have. All of those are valid reasons for trading in the Bolt EV. They don't need any other excuses, and they don't need to convince others or themselves that their choice is valid. Just get what works best for your situation, but don't pretend that's what's best for everyone else.

This seems like a bit of Jerry McGuireing here. "Who's coming with me!?!"

So a different framing of this discussion would be, list your top five pain points and issues with the current Chevrolet Bolt EV. If the next generation Bolt EV addressed three of those five concerns, would you consider buying the next generation Bolt EV? For example, a majority of my issues with the Bolt EV are related to the battery (charging profile, charging speed, range). If the next generation Bolt EV came with an Ultium battery option with 80 kWh of usable energy and a flat 125 kW charging speed to 80% battery, most of my concerns would be addressed, and I'd be happy upgrading to the next generation Bolt EV.
 

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Two of the issues are, let's be honest here, nonissues. . . . So really, if we get to the crux of this poll, there is really the only legitimate issue here: How will GM handle the battery recall? First, we must remember that we all have various iterations of a first-generation battery from LG. GM gave LG the specifications, and LG was offering an off-the-shelf battery solution that met those specification. So it's really not even GM's battery. An argument could be made that the 2020 Bolt EV's battery is much more of a GM battery, but it's not part of this recall. So who are we really upset with here? Who are Hyundai Kona Electric owners upset with? Hyundai or LG?

Second, we haven't even given GM a chance to provide a solution. They themselves said the solution would be available in 2021. We're only 10 days into 2021, folks. The patch was meant to mitigate what was already an extremely low fire risk. Could they be more transparent about the process of troubleshooting? Sure, but would you rather get information quickly or accurately?

Essentially, what I see is a lot of people who were already turned off of the Bolt EV for various reasons using this as a justification to move on. Maybe they hated GM, but it was the only EV they could afford at the time that could meet their day-to-day requirements. Maybe they wanted a different format vehicle that wasn't available as an EV then, but is or will be soon. Maybe there are some capabilities, features, and functions that have come out in subsequent EVs that these folk would rather have. All of those are valid reasons for trading in the Bolt EV. They don't need any other excuses, and they don't need to convince others or themselves that their choice is valid. Just get what works best for your situation, but don't pretend that's what's best for everyone else.

This seems like a bit of Jerry McGuireing here. "Who's coming with me!?!"

So a different framing of this discussion would be, list your top five pain points and issues with the current Chevrolet Bolt EV. If the next generation Bolt EV addressed three of those five concerns, would you consider buying the next generation Bolt EV? For example, a majority of my issues with the Bolt EV are related to the battery (charging profile, charging speed, range). If the next generation Bolt EV came with an Ultium battery option with 80 kWh of usable energy and a flat 125 kW charging speed to 80% battery, most of my concerns would be addressed, and I'd be happy upgrading to the next generation Bolt EV.
As usual, a voice of reason cutting through the clamor. (As someone mentioned earlier, we need a "REALLY LIKE" for exceptional posts.)

jack vines
 

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As usual, a voice of reason cutting through the clamor. (As someone mentioned earlier, we need a "REALLY LIKE" for exceptional posts.)

jack vines
Thank you. By the way, I just got another recall notice (I'm on GM's naughty list for not having my software updated yet). To quote the GM recall notice:

We are working around the clock on our continued investigation and we intend to deploy a final remedy and remove the 90 percent limitation as soon as possible after the first of the year. When that remedy is available, we will send you another letter asking you to take your vehicle to your Chevrolet dealer to have your vehicle serviced FREE of charge.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
The more I think about it, the more I'm curious whether a similar poll was ever posted on the Hyundai Kona Electric forums. :unsure:

Two of the issues are, let's be honest here, nonissues. I know far more Tesla owners who have complained about their 12 V batteries failing prematurely and having to be replaced multiple times, yet I've never heard one of them say it would influence their decision to buy another Tesla.
So two wrongs make a right ? Because Tesla owners complain about a poor quality Lead Acid battery I should be happy with one also? I will again restate my 3 concerns and humbly disagree that all 3 are valid concerns;
#1. It is very frustrating to pay X amount of $ per month and have to struggle with / make an effort to get GM to fix the issue temporarily by Boosting signals so it goes from less than 1mbps to 5-10mbps almost every time I want to use this service. As I stated earlier in this thread if it was all ATT's fault GM efforts would not cause any changes in the service at all but yet this is not the case!
#2. It is very frustrating to have a lead acid battery start failing a few months out of warranty. If it's such a non issue I guess I can tell my employer they imagined I showed up late for work or that it's no big deal? If it's such a non issue I guess someone on here can send me the approximate $350 to pay what the dealer wants to get another battery? I don't think I am doing anything purposefully to cause the problem but I will admit I am in the south west and these summers have been brutal lately (couple week stretches over 100 this summer). I still think the battery should have lasted 1-2 years longer. If my Bolt was older than that I WOULD NOT even be bringing up the issue as it would meet my expectations and probably most other's expectations. Perhaps another poll on how long people expect a lead acid battery to last?
#3. It is very frustrating to be told there is a problem but with no real fix... This HAS effected resale values as many people mentioned the damage is already real in that regard. Others on this forum who have the recall mentioned it caused other problems with the infotainment system. Finally, hindering the capacity does make it less useful for road trips or at least harder to use than what was originally purchased.
PS Eric don't take offence that I am disagreeing with You , I enjoy watching Your videos on Youtube we can just agree to disagree about my concerns.
 

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The more I think about it, the more I'm curious whether a similar poll was ever posted on the Hyundai Kona Electric forums. :unsure:

Two of the issues are, let's be honest here, nonissues. I know far more Tesla owners who have complained about their 12 V batteries failing prematurely and having to be replaced multiple times, yet I've never heard one of them say it would influence their decision to buy another Tesla.

The internet speed is another funny one, given I have a last generation Google phone, and its data and internet are slower than the Bolt EV's when used in my primary locations. As I've noted, the data speeds are enough to run video games, stream videos, and work remotely (Remote Desktop, Zoom, etc.). Is it as fast as a dedicated ISP? No, but it's technically a mobile device. Many cars still don't even offer a Wi-Fi hotspot, but again, I don't hear people say that they wouldn't consider another vehicle from that automaker.

So really, if we get to the crux of this poll, there is really the only legitimate issue here: How will GM handle the battery recall? First, we must remember that we all have various iterations of a first-generation battery from LG. GM gave LG the specifications, and LG was offering an off-the-shelf battery solution that met those specification. So it's really not even GM's battery. An argument could be made that the 2020 Bolt EV's battery is much more of a GM battery, but it's not part of this recall. So who are we really upset with here? Who are Hyundai Kona Electric owners upset with? Hyundai or LG?

Second, we haven't even given GM a chance to provide a solution. They themselves said the solution would be available in 2021. We're only 10 days into 2021, folks. The patch was meant to mitigate what was already an extremely low fire risk. Could they be more transparent about the process of troubleshooting? Sure, but would you rather get information quickly or accurately?

Essentially, what I see is a lot of people who were already turned off of the Bolt EV for various reasons using this as a justification to move on. Maybe they hated GM, but it was the only EV they could afford at the time that could meet their day-to-day requirements. Maybe they wanted a different format vehicle that wasn't available as an EV then, but is or will be soon. Maybe there are some capabilities, features, and functions that have come out in subsequent EVs that these folk would rather have. All of those are valid reasons for trading in the Bolt EV. They don't need any other excuses, and they don't need to convince others or themselves that their choice is valid. Just get what works best for your situation, but don't pretend that's what's best for everyone else.

This seems like a bit of Jerry McGuireing here. "Who's coming with me!?!"

So a different framing of this discussion would be, list your top five pain points and issues with the current Chevrolet Bolt EV. If the next generation Bolt EV addressed three of those five concerns, would you consider buying the next generation Bolt EV? For example, a majority of my issues with the Bolt EV are related to the battery (charging profile, charging speed, range). If the next generation Bolt EV came with an Ultium battery option with 80 kWh of usable energy and a flat 125 kW charging speed to 80% battery, most of my concerns would be addressed, and I'd be happy upgrading to the next generation Bolt EV.
So we all bought GM vehicles falsely thinking we were not going to be beta testers, and now we have learned otherwise. And GM is off the hook because they didn't make the battery? If an ICE car has a trans problem, nobody says it is not (insert carmaker here), it is Borg Warner or another supplier's fault. It has taken nearly 3 years for the Bosch iBooster problem to be properly identified and (supposedly) addressed as a software problem. So blame Bosch? How many of you are even real people, not avatars for GM to put out positive spin, or fanboys who will take whatever in stride?
 

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So two wrongs make a right ? Because Tesla owners complain about a poor quality Lead Acid battery I should be happy with one also? I will again restate my 3 concerns and humbly disagree that all 3 are valid concerns;
That's not the point. The point is, 12 V batteries are a wear item. You have to treat them like windshield wipers, brake pads, etc. The 12 V battery in the Bolt EV is actually very high quality and oversized for the job. If you had one go out early, it's likely just bad luck. If you've had multiple go out prematurely, it's likely due either to an issue with your specific car (e.g., a short) or your specific use case (e.g., heavy accessory usage).

#1. It is very frustrating to pay X amount of $ per month and have to struggle with / make an effort to get GM to fix the issue temporarily by Boosting signals so it goes from less than 1mbps to 5-10mbps almost every time I want to use this service. As I stated earlier in this thread if it was all ATT's fault GM efforts would not cause any changes in the service at all but yet this is not the case!
Did GM say specifically that they were "boosting your signal"? How exactly does that work? Do they feed more power to your onboard Wi-Fi? I've never heard of such a thing, and anything similar to that would require an actual hardware upgrade.

Now, it's possible that your bandwidth was curtailed due to high usage, and if that's the case, it's possible that AT&T was restricting your bandwidth in violation of their contract with GM/OnStar. Based on my experiences with AT&T, that wouldn't come as much of a surprise. And yes, that's something that GM's efforts would affect.

Otherwise, much like the signal in any other mobile device I've had, the quality of service will depend a lot on how busy the towers are. I know that my internet is far slower on peak times than it is on off-peak times.

#2. It is very frustrating to have a lead acid battery start failing a few months out of warranty. If it's such a non issue I guess I can tell my employer they imagined I showed up late for work or that it's no big deal? If it's such a non issue I guess someone on here can send me the approximate $350 to pay what the dealer wants to get another battery? I don't think I am doing anything purposefully to cause the problem but I will admit I am in the south west and these summers have been brutal lately (couple week stretches over 100 this summer). I still think the battery should have lasted 1-2 years longer. If my Bolt was older than that I WOULD NOT even be bringing up the issue as it would meet my expectations and probably most other's expectations. Perhaps another poll on how long people expect a lead acid battery to last?
See my comments above. It might just be bad luck. I'm not saying it's a non-issue. Have it replaced under warranty (it should have a 3 year warranty). If it fails again, have it replaced again. My car has spent plenty of time in 100+ F weather. Again, after 4 years and 130,000+ miles, I'm still on the original battery.

#3. It is very frustrating to be told there is a problem but with no real fix... This HAS effected resale values as many people mentioned the damage is already real in that regard. Others on this forum who have the recall mentioned it caused other problems with the infotainment system. Finally, hindering the capacity does make it less useful for road trips or at least harder to use than what was originally purchased.
PS Eric don't take offence that I am disagreeing with You , I enjoy watching Your videos on Youtube we can just agree to disagree about my concerns.
This is a safety recall that is still under investigation. As much as we might want an instant fix and complete, detailed answer, we won't get one. The Bolt EV's resale value was already low, and we're hitting a point where the first leases are dumping into the market. I actually wonder whether, outside of the stop-sale order, this battery recall had any impact on resale value whatsoever.

Yes, if there's an issue with the infotainment system, that's a problem. Have you experienced those? I haven't heard a lot of Bolt EV owners talking about it. Again, though, this is a temporary fix. I just got a letter reiterating that today.

As for the impact on long trips, it is really only a significant issue for people who are trying to use 100% of their range before the first stop. People on these forums regularly call me crazy for arriving at chargers with less than 10% battery. Now I'm being told that by losing 10% capacity, the Bolt EV can't really travel. That seems to be a bit contradictory. As someone who already has 6% to 8% battery degradation and almost exclusively uses Hilltop Reserve at this point, I find that concept somewhat funny. Especially since removing the top 10% of the battery doesn't affect the charging profile You still shouldn't be charging past 70% without good reason or 85% unless absolutely necessary. A cap at 90% battery would have very little impact on long trips.
 

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So we all bought GM vehicles falsely thinking we were not going to be beta testers, and now we have learned otherwise. And GM is off the hook because they didn't make the battery? If an ICE car has a trans problem, nobody says it is not (insert carmaker here), it is Borg Warner or another supplier's fault. It has taken nearly 3 years for the Bosch iBooster problem to be properly identified and (supposedly) addressed as a software problem. So blame Bosch? How many of you are even real people, not avatars for GM to put out positive spin, or fanboys who will take whatever in stride?
Who said any of that? The point is, if you're concerned about the battery, it shouldn't prevent you from considering another GM product. It should prevent you from considering another GM product with that battery, or a battery made by LG, or a battery made by LG in Korea, etc. If GM's next Bolt EV pack was a 4680 pack purchased from Tesla, would you still use this incident as a reason for not buying another GM EV product? Put in that context, it seems somewhat absurd to make that leap, doesn't it?

I'm not here to tell people how to spend their money, but I will call out an irrational argument when I see one. What could have been a highly constructive thread focused on how GM could improve their EV platforms turned into just another customer complaint seeking validation. If someone won't buy another GM EV product, they should share those reasons with GM rather than seeking approval from random strangers online.
 

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Who said any of that? The point is, if you're concerned about the battery, it shouldn't prevent you from considering another GM product. It should prevent you from considering another GM product with that battery, or a battery made by LG, or a battery made by LG in Korea, etc. If GM's next Bolt EV pack was a 4680 pack purchased from Tesla, would you still use this incident as a reason for not buying another GM EV product? Put in that context, it seems somewhat absurd to make that leap, doesn't it?

I'm not here to tell people how to spend their money, but I will call out an irrational argument when I see one. What could have been a highly constructive thread focused on how GM could improve their EV platforms turned into just another customer complaint seeking validation. If someone won't buy another GM EV product, they should share those reasons with GM rather than seeking approval from random strangers online.
Seriously? This thread asked if the battery issue, AND GMs response to it, would impact the purchase of another GM vehicle. I stated my opinion, and why I feel that way. You are being judgemental and rude. You can disagree, but my reasoning is not "ABSURD", my argument is not "IRRATIONAL" just because you disagree with it, and the whole point of this venue is to share with random strangers online. I certainly don't want or need your approval. I hope the moderator is taking note of your personal attacks.
 

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Seriously? This thread asked if the battery issue, AND GMs response to it, would impact the purchase of another GM vehicle. I stated my opinion, and why I feel that way. You are being judgemental and rude. You can disagree, but my reasoning is not "ABSURD", my argument is not "IRRATIONAL" just because you disagree with it, and the whole point of this venue is to share with random strangers online. I certainly don't want or need your approval. I hope the moderator is taking note of your personal attacks.
Yes, seriously. If the point of this thread was solely about the traction battery issue and GM's response, then it shouldn't be diluted with issues like the AGM battery or Wi-Fi speeds. And in focusing on the battery issue, I simply noted the fact that the battery was sourced from outside GM and not necessarily representative of future GM products (i.e., an absurd leap and conjecture). In addition, I illustrated the fact that GM has publicly stated through numerous communications that the software patch was temporary and used only to mitigate potential fire risks (the actual corrective measure will be forthcoming this year). Finally, I used analogies playing off of people's preferred brands to illustrate a double standard being applied in this situation.

Now, if you take that as a personal attack, I'm sorry. Perhaps you're taking this all a bit too personally. As for your argument being rational, what, specifically, is that argument again? All I saw were strawmen, accusations, and personal attacks here:

So we all bought GM vehicles falsely thinking we were not going to be beta testers, and now we have learned otherwise. And GM is off the hook because they didn't make the battery? If an ICE car has a trans problem, nobody says it is not (insert carmaker here), it is Borg Warner or another supplier's fault. It has taken nearly 3 years for the Bosch iBooster problem to be properly identified and (supposedly) addressed as a software problem. So blame Bosch? How many of you are even real people, not avatars for GM to put out positive spin, or fanboys who will take whatever in stride?
 

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just because you disagree with it, and the whole point of this venue is to share with random strangers online. I certainly don't want or need your approval. I hope the moderator is taking note of your personal attacks.
Um, didn't you write this?:
How many of you are even real people, not avatars for GM to put out positive spin, or fanboys who will take whatever in stride?
Word to the wise, when you throw around inflammatory language like that then you don't get to cry when someone responds in like. That you are losing your mind because someone called your argument "absurd" and "irrational" while you accuse literally everyone on this forum of just being GM shills is some next-level hypocrisy.

Also your argument is a bit absurd. My old Explorer was recalled because something could cause a fire. I didn't start claiming that I must be a "beta tester" and vow never to drive a Ford again.
 

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To put this thread back on track a little, it looks like, of the respondents so far, two thirds would be willing to consider a GM EV in the future if GM handles this battery recall situation well. Over 40% say it is dependent on the outcome, but the response seems like it could be a pretty broad spectrum. I'm not sure what each individual defines as an acceptable outcome.

Some of the individual names under each vote do surprise me a bit, though I know some people have already traded in their Bolt EVs as a result of the recall. So I guess that part makes sense. Maybe most telling of all, it demonstrates that the members of this forum are far from a bunch of GM loyalists, which of course makes sense considering a large majority of Bolt EV owners are new to the brand.

32736
 

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To put this thread back on track a little, it looks like, of the respondents so far, two thirds would be willing to consider a GM EV in the future if GM handles this battery recall situation well. Over 40% say it is dependent on the outcome, but the response seems like it could be a pretty broad spectrum. I'm not sure what each individual defines as an acceptable outcome.

Some of the individual names under each vote do surprise me a bit, though I know some people have already traded in their Bolt EVs as a result of the recall. So I guess that part makes sense. Maybe most telling of all, it demonstrates that the members of this forum are far from a bunch of GM loyalists, which of course makes sense considering a large majority of Bolt EV owners are new to the brand.

View attachment 32736
When the recall was announced in November GM says a final solution will be available next year. I took that as a solution will be announced by January 2021. Now I'm realizing that the final solution is an open date that may happen anytime for the whole year 2021.
 

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When the recall was announced in November GM says a final solution will be available next year. I took that as a solution will be announced by January 2021. Now I'm realizing that the final solution is an open date that may happen anytime for the whole year 2021.
I just received a recall notice that states the following verbatim (emphasis mine):

We are working around the clock on our continued investigation and we intend to deploy a final remedy and remove the 90 percent limitation as soon as possible after the first of the year. When that remedy is available, we will send you another letter asking you to take your vehicle to your Chevrolet dealer to have your vehicle serviced FREE of charge.
Sure, that technically means sometime in 2021, but as soon as possible after the first typically means they are shooting for sometime in January.
 

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Yes, seriously. If the point of this thread was solely about the traction battery issue and GM's response, then it shouldn't be diluted with issues like the AGM battery or Wi-Fi speeds. And in focusing on the battery issue, I simply noted the fact that the battery was sourced from outside GM and not necessarily representative of future GM products (i.e., an absurd leap and conjecture). In addition, I illustrated the fact that GM has publicly stated through numerous communications that the software patch was temporary and used only to mitigate potential fire risks (the actual corrective measure will be forthcoming this year). Finally, I used analogies playing off of people's preferred brands to illustrate a double standard being applied in this situation.

Now, if you take that as a personal attack, I'm sorry. Perhaps you're taking this all a bit too personally. As for your argument being rational, what, specifically, is that argument again? All I saw were strawmen, accusations, and personal attacks here:
Let's be clear: I defended the 12v battery issue, as most last 4-5 years, and that is technology limited and suggested longer life was likely for AGM batteries in low heat locations. I had NO input on the Wi-Fi issue, as I am not paying them when I have unlimited Wi-fi on my phone, so I had no skin in the game. On the battery, I made the analogy that the source of the product is completely irrelevant: how many people know who made the individual subsystems in their cars? And would you choose your next car based on that sub-system manufacturer's parts being used in your next car? What if LG manufactures the new GM battery technology? So far, ALL GM batteries have been LG sourced. So I guess you are as entitled to your knee-jerk defense of GM as I am with my disappointment with the lack of transparency and support (let's take KeyPass as an example, for the VAST majority of users, didn't work,. doesn't work, won't work, and let's not even mention over the air updates). Okay, we see that some have already sold their cars at diminished value because of the recall. Others, like me, simply are not driving it. So as we move along in January, we will see if the solution comes. There is no indication they have identified the problem beyond conjectures on forums like this. If it is solved with a "reasonable" solution (and since we don't KNOW what the issue is, it could include: battery replacement for specific identifiable "bad" batteries, compensation for lost range if not repairable or repurchase of the vehicle at market value, or a simple software fix that leaves the cars as they were before the issue arose) I will be the first to hail GM as having handled this in an examplary way. Forgive my skepticism
 

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Um, didn't you write this?:

Word to the wise, when you throw around inflammatory language like that then you don't get to cry when someone responds in like. That you are losing your mind because someone called your argument "absurd" and "irrational" while you accuse literally everyone on this forum of just being GM shills is some next-level hypocrisy.

Also your argument is a bit absurd. My old Explorer was recalled because something could cause a fire. I didn't start claiming that I must be a "beta tester" and vow never to drive a Ford again.
Sure, I wrote that, but let's add some context here to the comment that preceded that on not being beta testers. We all know that the largest selling EV is Tesla, and not by a little. In fact, only Ford and VW are on the horizon with a real competitors in the next 24 months. Teslas have build quality issues, and when you buy a new model, the over the air software updates are needed because every owner is essentially a beta tester for their highly software driven cars. The mitigating factor is the over the air updates, which fix problems (relatively) quickly. People who buy Teslas appear to be aware that they are purchasing from a company that is not a 100+ year old auto manufacturer and are willingly acting as beta testers for these vehicles in order to get the latest and greatest technology (and I say this because the Tesla owners I know are not dissatisfied). I chose not to go that route. I expected a step below cutting edge, but I also expected experienced auto manufacturer behavior. So sure, I made some strong statements, but all of the defenses of GM are their marketing spin and promises, to date. I hope to be proven wrong.
 

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I just received a recall notice that states the following verbatim (emphasis mine):



Sure, that technically means sometime in 2021, but as soon as possible after the first typically means they are shooting for sometime in January.
I am encouraged by your interpretation of "after the first" as sometime in January. I think this will calm a lot of people down myself included. we are all frustrated and emotions seem to be flying high and it shows in the thread conversation.
 

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I am encouraged by your interpretation of "after the first" as sometime in January. I think this will calm a lot of people down myself included. we are all frustrated and emotions seem to be flying high and it shows in the thread conversation.
I think it's up to you how you want to interpret it. For sure it means that GM is treating it as a priority. What it means in actual terms is anyone's guess. My hope is that they at least announce what the final action will be sometime this month. Just based on the number of affected units and the amount of work that might need to be done, this is a recall where active fixes could still be in progress into next year.
 
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