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That's actually a fairly heavy trailer before anything is put in it. Is there a spec plate on it that you can quote?


Trailer is about 800lbs.. bike and accessories are at about 400-500lbs. About 12-1300lbs total. Tongue is about 10% of total weight. All within spec of the hitch which is 200/2000lbs

Did about 500-600 miles over 2 days. Car handled not one issue, even through the hills. Range, as one might assume was significantly reduced. On a full charge I was getting about 150 miles on a full charge.




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Allow me to put a fine point on things: If you are involved in any accident when towing something with the Bolt, you are opening yourself up to huge liability. The manual clearly states that the Bolt is not designed to tow. You may find that your own insurance company won't cover you when they realize you were towing against the owner manual's instructions. Then what? You have let all your assets be exposed to the whims of the other parties involved.

All that for a load of gravel or whatever.

Best of luck ...


This right here... is complete BS.




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To be clear, if you cannot cite a vehicle code... either local state or federal... or even an ordinance local or otherwise... I will stand by my statement of the warning is complete BS.


If modifications where illegal, then all the custom and aftermarket industry, that come to the billions in revenue, are all in trouble.

Prove me wrong with some actual facts.
Because as we all know, anecdotal evidence is not evidence.
 

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It's a difference in risk tolerance. I've got a higher tolerance for risk, and the thought of starting over from nothing hardly matters to me. It's an extremely unlikely possibility anyhow.

I'm not concerned with what is legal, or what my exposure to liability is. I live by the spirit of the law, which is to pose no unreasonable risk to the public. When I tow a yard of dirt, I'm not exceeding 40 MPH, and I'm leaving 50 yards distance between me and the guy ahead. The trip is 5 miles. I certainly wouldn't travel 200 miles at 75 MPH on the freeway in heavy traffic with that load.

People might disagree with me, but, that's just, like their opinion, man.

If people want to buy a truck rated to pull the load they want to pull, and take out a million dollar liability policy, that's their prerogative. I risk more and gain more, and that may backfire one day, but so far I've profited.
 

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What I fail to see in all the geniuse's arguments who want to tow with the Bolt is exactly why GM says you should not. I suppose you are all much more informed than the engineers who designed it. Oh, I almost forgot this is the American way and then sue when your transmission (yes there is one of sorts) burns up or the gears break. Or when you frame is tweaked and the wheel don't align and you start scrubbing tires. Something in the design is not rated to tow but you all don't care, do you? This is not about being safe, it is about not being stupid.
Find out the facts last of course.
 

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What I fail to see in all the geniuse's arguments who want to tow with the Bolt is exactly why GM says you should not. I suppose you are all much more informed than the engineers who designed it. Oh, I almost forgot this is the American way and then sue when your transmission (yes there is one of sorts) burns up or the gears break. Or when you frame is tweaked and the wheel don't align and you start scrubbing tires. Something in the design is not rated to tow but you all don't care, do you? This is not about being safe, it is about not being stupid.
Find out the facts last of course.
I'm gonna guess towing my Waverunner to the local launch ramp puts less stress on my Bolt than if I had to regularly cart around a typical American "cheeseburger-stuffed" family of four. If you do not think towing is an acceptable risk, then you're free to not do it. I, like redpoint5, do. And, to quote Kevin Kline in "A Fish Called Wanda", Don't Call Me Stupid!
 

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U-Haul is a big corporation. Their attorneys wouldn't let them sell a product that could blow back in their faces.

The corporation is cautious. They won't rent any kind of trailer to be towed with any convertible, or with a plastic-top (Blazer) SUV. First generation Ford Explorers are prohibited too.

If they are selling hitches for Bolts, their attorneys have concluded these aren't high risk. Everybody chill!
 

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All I am saying is that if the manufacturer of my new $35,000 car says do not tow, it would be smart to know the reason why. Maybe it is nonsense, and maybe it is not. If not, tow away. And yes, it is stupid to assume ( but since we are all testosterone filled American males with complete knowledge of all things mechanical including a text-book memory of all the pertaining laws of physics), that you know better than a company with a legion of engineers and don't ask the simple question, why can't I? Maybe, just maybe there is a legitimate answer. Can anyone here tell me why GM says no to towing with an actual truthful, researched, non-anecdotal explanation?
Did Curtis, TorqueLift, U-haul or Draw Tight conduct stress tests on the frame? If so, I'd love to see the data.
 

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Regarding the legal/insurance aspect of this issue, I read a post on another forum posted by someone that works in the auto insurance industry, and they stated they never saw anything in policy that said a claim would be denied if it was found out an insured person was towing more than the rated capacity of their vehicle, and had never seen a claim denied due to towing in excess of rated capacity. Towing a load in excess of the car's rated capacity is also not against the law, so a cop can't cite you for that.

Even if you suffer some powertrain failure probably caused by towing and dealer/GM suspected you were towing loads with your Bolt (tech notices you have trailer wiring installed along with a hitch), the burden of proof is still on GM to prove that your towing was a direct cause for the failure.\

So as long as you don't record yourself towing a boat with your Bolt and then upload it to YouTube, you are probably fine.
 

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All I am saying is that if the manufacturer of my new $35,000 car says do not tow, it would be smart to know the reason why. Maybe it is nonsense, and maybe it is not. If not, tow away. And yes, it is stupid to assume ( but since we are all testosterone filled American males with complete knowledge of all things mechanical including a text-book memory of all the pertaining laws of physics), that you know better than a company with a legion of engineers and don't ask the simple question, why can't I? Maybe, just maybe there is a legitimate answer. Can anyone here tell me why GM says no to towing with an actual truthful, researched, non-anecdotal explanation?
Did Curtis, TorqueLift, U-haul or Draw Tight conduct stress tests on the frame? If so, I'd love to see the data.
The trick is trying to get the proper answer from the proper person at an organization as enormous as GM. To that end, perhaps deliberately, the owners manual does not say "do not tow". It says "The vehicle is neither designed nor intended to tow a trailer." And then Chevrolet list a hitch on their accessories page.

There is a long list of products being used for purposes other than as designed - in part I'm sure because people will do things until they're given a good reason not to - and sometimes even then. Imagine a world in which people only did what they were told they COULD do...

Until we get a good reason for the manual's statement about towing, it seems we'll have to generate and gather our own data. I'm looking forward to towing a small HF utility trailer and adding a data point.
 

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The trick is trying to get the proper answer from the proper person at an organization as enormous as GM. To that end, perhaps deliberately, the owners manual does not say "do not tow". It says "The vehicle is neither designed nor intended to tow a trailer." And then Chevrolet list a hitch on their accessories page.

There is a long list of products being used for purposes other than as designed - in part I'm sure because people will do things until they're given a good reason not to - and sometimes even then. Imagine a world in which people only did what they were told they COULD do...

Until we get a good reason for the manual's statement about towing, it seems we'll have to generate and gather our own data. I'm looking forward to towing a small HF utility trailer and adding a data point.
It is common practice to not only design and test for know and intended use, but *also* for "reasonably foreseeable misuse". It is expected that vehicles are used for towing, especially when accessories are sold for the vehicle which enable towing. In this case, you can order a hitch for your Bolt directly from GM. This hitch is intended for use for such items as bike carriers and therefore they state it is not intended for towing. It is reasonable to assume that someone would attach a trailer to this style (Class I or Class II) hitch with the expectation the vehicle can pull a proper load for that class of receiver.

Regardless... it's down to personal risk tolerance, and the consequences. Telling someone your risk level is correct and someone else's is wrong is never a successful discussion
 

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My '99 Outback is rated to tow 2,000 lbs, the identical car is rated 3,500 lbs tow capacity in Australia. I suspect the difference is concern from the legal department not the engineering specs.
 

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All I am saying is that if the manufacturer of my new $35,000 car says do not tow, it would be smart to know the reason why. Maybe it is nonsense, and maybe it is not. If not, tow away. And yes, it is stupid to assume ( but since we are all testosterone filled American males with complete knowledge of all things mechanical including a text-book memory of all the pertaining laws of physics), that you know better than a company with a legion of engineers and don't ask the simple question, why can't I? Maybe, just maybe there is a legitimate answer. Can anyone here tell me why GM says no to towing with an actual truthful, researched, non-anecdotal explanation?
Did Curtis, TorqueLift, U-haul or Draw Tight conduct stress tests on the frame? If so, I'd love to see the data.
It might be that Chevy simply didn't spend the money to test towing with the vehicle to definitively recommend it. To say that it wasn't designed to tow is CYA jargon. Now if they had said that towing will damage the vehicle or create a dangerous situation, then that's something else entirely. I can think of no physics reason why pulling a light trailer with the Bolt would be any worse than vehicles of similar size. Worst case, the brakes are undersized since the car relies so much on regen (though I doubt this). That means we'd need to be careful on steep grades with heavy loads.

I just moved into a house on a steep hill last week. I've been using my Prius to tow a 4x8 trailer full of stuff between the apartment and the house. The Prius is not rated to tow anything. No issues, and I'm happy to accomplish these trips using the wimpy 11 mile EV only mode. It's very satisfying to sail through the air hardly making any noise, and burning no fuel.
 

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Been there done that! Not so dramatic but got home with the transmission cooked, smoking badly, dribbling fluid in the driveway. AMC Eagle (Chrysler A/T) pulling a 1,500 lb camp trailer that had more wind resistance than the Eagle wanted. Cost $1,000 to replace all the transmission seals. That Eagle looked gorgeous but was bad in numerous ways.
 

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It is common practice to not only design and test for know and intended use, but *also* for "reasonably foreseeable misuse". It is expected that vehicles are used for towing, especially when accessories are sold for the vehicle which enable towing. In this case, you can order a hitch for your Bolt directly from GM. This hitch is intended for use for such items as bike carriers and therefore they state it is not intended for towing. It is reasonable to assume that someone would attach a trailer to this style (Class I or Class II) hitch with the expectation the vehicle can pull a proper load for that class of receiver.

Regardless... it's down to personal risk tolerance, and the consequences. Telling someone you're risk level is correct and someone else's is wrong is never a successful discussion.
Nice recap. Thank-you for highlighting the essence of my post.

I'll never be the first person to tie a bunch of bungy cords to a bridge and jump, but I don't mind jumping second. And I'm fine with someone else taking a pass, just let us have our fun. Now, if that third person is someone that works at some place like the Acme Bungy Co and is offering info, then I'll be sure to listen before jumping :)
 

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U-Haul is a big corporation. Their attorneys wouldn't let them sell a product that could blow back in their faces.

The corporation is cautious. They won't rent any kind of trailer to be towed with any convertible, or with a plastic-top (Blazer) SUV. First generation Ford Explorers are prohibited too.
Years ago, a buddy of mine wanted me to help haul a car of his using my Suburban. I drove a couple hundred miles to the trailer rental place, and the guy almost wouldn't let me rent the trailer. He said my Suburban wasn't rated to tow the size of trailer we needed to haul the car. My Suburban is 350 V8 4x4. I'm like what? I had a full tow kit with trailer brakes and even have a transmission cooler radiator. I had to take a picture of the name plate on the door showing the rated tow capacity to convince the guy that it was rated to tow the trailer.

So not all places let you rent just any trailer for any vehicle.
 

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To all the geniuses that say that GM says that you should not tow, please point it out in the manual?

The manual says not intended or designed... not that it cannot or should not.

Car wasn’t designed for 18” wheels either.. but we can swap.. cars are utility vehicles.




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All I am saying is that if the manufacturer of my new $35,000 car says do not tow, it would be smart to know the reason why. Maybe it is nonsense, and maybe it is not. If not, tow away. And yes, it is stupid to assume ( but since we are all testosterone filled American males with complete knowledge of all things mechanical including a text-book memory of all the pertaining laws of physics), that you know better than a company with a legion of engineers and don't ask the simple question, why can't I? Maybe, just maybe there is a legitimate answer. Can anyone here tell me why GM says no to towing with an actual truthful, researched, non-anecdotal explanation?
Did Curtis, TorqueLift, U-haul or Draw Tight conduct stress tests on the frame? If so, I'd love to see the data.


Show where in the manual it say DO NOT TOW..

I looked. It just said not designed or intended. But it does have a towing section that says pleas load over the axle.

So, even in the manual it shows that it can.

Not designed or intended does not mean DO NOT or CAN NOT.



Page 199 and 246 of the manual...

6. If your vehicle will be TOWING...
 

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