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Chevy Bolt 2023
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Chevy Bolt EV 2023. Pending home installation of a level 2 charger, I am charging the battery with the dual level charger that I purchased as an extra with the car via a 3 prong outlet in my garage. I seem to have two options for installing a level 2 charger:
  • Install a hardwired vendor-supplied charger (and purchase the charger)
  • Install a 4 prong NEMA outlet with GFCI breaker and use the 4 prong connector that came with the dual level charger .
My understanding is that for option (1) Chevy will cover the entire installation plus up to $250 for permitting. For option (2) I am getting conflicting information on whether Chevy will provide the same coverage as option (1) or only $1000 for the installation (plus up to $250 for permitting). I am also told that option (1) is the safer option.
Can anybody enlighten me on whether I have this right and/or provide any advice?
 

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2022 Bolt EUV Premier w/ Sun n Sound
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Since you have already purchased the dual level EVSE and Chevy provides the NEMA 14-50 outlet for free or essentially free then that would be the way to go.
No need to buy a second EVSE.
You'll get a thousand responses on here about the dollars and cents....your best bet is to start the Qmerit process and discuss with the folks actually quoting the work.
You can use the search function on the forum and you'll find hundreds of explanations and quote comparisons from other members.
 

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2022 EUV Premier. 2021 VW id.4 FE. Former owner of 2020 EV Premier.
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I originally had my EVSE plugged into a receptacle. I never needed to remove the EVSE from the receptacle, so I figured this would be fine. Over time, the stress of the plug being plugged into the receptacle caused a short (could be fixed by making sure the EVSE is at same depth as receptacle, mine was not). I had electrician out recently to convert my EVSE to hardwired with a junction box, as it supported that.

So if you do choose to leave it plugged in, make sure the EVSE cord to the receptacle is not at an angle or anything that would cause stress and end up shorting out the connection, or you’ll need the electrician back again ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When I spoke with a vendor, he advised against using NEMA outlets for EV charging as they tend to burn out. Sounds as if there may be something to that. Whether it's worth purchasing a second EVSE is, of course, another question.
 

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2022 Bolt EUV Premier w/ Sun n Sound
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Installed June 2018 outside and has been through all 4 seasons almost 5 times over.
The NEMA 14-50 also serves our motorhome when it is getting prepped for a trip so maybe gets unplugged 12X per year.
No issues whatsoever.

Electrical wiring Brick Gadget Audio equipment Font
 

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When I spoke with a vendor, he advised against using NEMA outlets for EV charging as they tend to burn out. Sounds as if there may be something to that. Whether it's worth purchasing a second EVSE is, of course, another question.
If that was an electrical vendor, stay away from them and look certified EV installer for knowledge.
 

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Technically, for home charging it makes no difference.
I opted for a plug-in as I can take the EVSE when I move. Hard wired is not so easy... Plus I think hardwired may require permit (local adoption of the code), while plug in does not.
 

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If your EVSE is hard wired, it is very dangerous to steal. I can just imagine the effects of cutting the 240v cable feed by a 40A plus breaker... Not smart.
I don't believe that this is much of an issue now, but could be in the future.
 

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I personally prefer hard-wired, but if you're going to go with plug-in, it's recommended that you not use the cheapest 14-50 receptacle, use a Hubble or similar. The cost is around $50.00 instead of less than $20.00, but you do get what you pay for. There's more than one YouTube video showing what happens with the cheap receptacles.
 

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Should be on a GFI by code.
Yes, No, Maybe. Our EVSE was installed by our local utility, using a three-wire plug without a GFI. I'd expected to see the four-wire installation as on most home appliances today. I quizzed both the installer and the city electrical inspector and both told me our code does not require either 4-wire or GFI on EV supply installations. Both said, since there's no 115-volt tap, 230-volt only, dedicated line, it is what it is.

jack vines
 

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No GFI breaker if hardwired. You only need a GFI breaker if you using a plug/receptacle setup.
Thank you for correcting me.
The utility chose to use a plug/receptacle without a GFI and the city inspector says it's to code.

jack vines
If it's an outdoor receptacle installation, it requires a GFI by NEC code. I understand municipalities will interpret national code to suit objectives.
 

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2022 Bolt EUV Premier: sold back to GM Jan ‘23
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The utility chose to use a plug/receptacle without a GFI and the city inspector says it's to code.
Yep, not all cities/counties adhere to the NEC, or might still be using an older version. It's within their power to do so, and if their inspector says it's good, you're good.
 

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Yep, not all cities/counties adhere to the NEC, or might still be using an older version. It's within their power to do so, and if their inspector says it's good, you're good.
Define "you're good". Then I'll use that to tell your or the victim's family.
From a legal standpoint, don't fool yourself. You could still be held liable. From a moral standpoint, you knew but "you're good."

Also:
210.8(A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt through 250-volt receptacles installed in the locations specified in 210.8(A)(1) through (A)⁠(11) and supplied by single-phase branch circuits rated 150 volts or less to ground shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

(1) Bathrooms

(2) Garages and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use

(3) Outdoors
 

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From a legal standpoint, don't fool yourself. You could still be held liable.
If the local electrical inspector signs off on the work and issues the approval paperwork, I can't see how a homeowner would be liable for something that later failed. That's their job, to certify the results as acceptable. You can't be held liable for not complying with the electrical code if it's not a requirement of that specific community. Yes, I agree that the NEC should be the standard for the entire country. But that's not the way it works. Cities can choose the level they want to be compliant with.
 

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Yes, I agree that the NEC should be the standard for the entire country. But that's not the way it works. Cities can choose the level they want to be compliant with.
Do you understand why cities choose their level of compliancy? I believe you do. If not, I will give you a hint. It's not about safety.

Knowing this, why would anyone allow that decision to affect your loved ones or someone else's. I digress.
 

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Define "you're good". Then I'll use that to tell your or the victim's family.
From a legal standpoint, don't fool yourself. You could still be held liable. From a moral standpoint, you knew but "you're good."
First let's clarify that this requirement is somewhat recent and not adopted in all areas and installations are grandfathered to the code in effect at the time of installation.
There are a couple of exceptions.
My particular installation in Ontario complied with the code in effect in 2014 where there was no such requirement for a GFCI on a 240V receptacle, only outdoor 120V types.
The installation here was performed by a licensed and registered electrical contractor and subsequently inspected by the Electrical Safety Authority (ESA) so, ya, I'm good.
Enough with the fear mongering please. I understand the US legal system doesn't operate exactly the same but I still think Jack is also good.
If I was installing a new one today then today's code would apply and I might have to do it or hardwire.
There are some exceptions for RV type installations as well since all RVs now come equipped with GFCI and some times two of them cause grief with each other.
 
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