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The default for Qmerit is to install a NEMA 14-50 receptacle on a 50 amp circuit, but I have heard cases of them installing a 14-50 on a 40 amp circuit (which is okay by code, but triggers some people), hard-wiring EVSEs, or even installing 20 amp circuits with a NEMA 6-20 receptacle. It really all depends on how competent your local installer is. But it does seem like Qmerit will approve these types on installations, and probably others.
 

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I recently purchased a Chevy Bolt EV 2023. Pending home installation of a level 2 charger, I am charging the battery with the dual level charger that I purchased as an extra with the car via a 3 prong outlet in my garage. I seem to have two options for installing a level 2 charger:
  • Install a hardwired vendor-supplied charger (and purchase the charger)
  • Install a 4 prong NEMA outlet with GFCI breaker and use the 4 prong connector that came with the dual level charger .
.....I am also told that option (1) is the safer option.
I don't know what the Q merit offer is with regards to hard wired vs an outlet, but I would guess that the limit is going to be $1000 regardless. That's a guess.

I used an outlet in my garage, which I installed myself. It was a short run of wire to the subpanel which had space and supply power for a 40amp circuit. It was a very easy job; I am no electrician but I can follow directions. I initially used a regular breaker, then found out that there is new-ish addition to the electrical code that specifies GCFI breakers for EV charging outlets. So I switched to the much more expensive GCFI breaker.

"Safer" is a relative term. Inside a garage, protected from the elements (we have very cold and long winters here) I was perfectly comfortable using a 14-50 outlet. I bought a commercial outlet; it was more expensive but obviously better built than the first one I bought at a big box store. I also used a quality PVC box and aluminum faceplate. I also built a little shelf for the stock EVSE unit so it wasn't just hanging by the outlet.

Something similar would probably be the most cost effective option for you. For outdoor use, I would go with a hard wired EVSE, I just would not trust the stock chevy charging cord being outside, in our weather, all the time. But that's an opinion.
 

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If it's an outdoor receptacle installation, it requires a GFI by NEC code. I understand municipalities will interpret national code to suit objectives.
The current National Electrical requires a GFI breaker on all EVSE installs when using a plug/receptacle setup. They don't make any distinction as to outdoor or indoor.

See section 625.54

You can signup for a free National Electrical account and read the code for free.
 

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The current National Electrical requires a GFI breaker on all EVSE installs when using a plug/receptacle setup. They don't make any distinction as to outdoor or indoor.

See section 625.54

You can signup for a free National Electrical account and read the code for free.
I'm sorry I wasn't clear. I was making a blanket statement about all outdoor receptacles. However, you are also right.
 

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Reason to use hardwired. View attachment 52273

I do not like quoting pictures, but this one is a must.


That is a perfect example of how not to install the EVSE.
And of course, how to make sure wiring is OK.

What is wrong with this one?

The power supply to the EVSE was bent
It should go straight down or eventually slightly off center, but not twisted 180 degrees up. That causes not wanted strains and forces that could cause poor electrical connection.
 

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I do not like quoting pictures, but this one is a must.


That is a perfect example of how not to install the EVSE.
And of course, how to make sure wiring is OK.

What is wrong with this one?

The power supply to the EVSE was bent
It should go straight down or eventually slightly off center, but not twisted 180 degrees up. That causes not wanted strains and forces that could cause poor electrical connection.
There was a loose connection inside the wall plug on one of the hot wires, had nothing to do with the EVSE plug. This was install by a licensed electrician and when I took the melted wall plug out and pulled on one of the screw in terminals, it slipped right off. The other three screws were properly torqued.
 

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There was a loose connection inside the wall plug on one of the hot wires, had nothing to do with the EVSE plug. This was install by a licensed electrician and when I took the melted wall plug out and pulled on one of the screw in terminals, it slipped right off. The other three screws were properly torqued.
Yep. Improper torque. Was aluminum cabling used too?

I would ask for re-torquing, after 100 operation hours, in the quote as well.
 

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There was a loose connection inside the wall plug on one of the hot wires, had nothing to do with the EVSE plug. This was install by a licensed electrician and when I took the melted wall plug out and pulled on one of the screw in terminals, it slipped right off. The other three screws were properly torqued.
CHargePint clearly sates not to install bent the plug. It must be freely hanging... It is a quite thick cable and very short hence the radius to turn it 180 degrees up is very tight, meaning a lot of torque.
 

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Reason to use hardwired. View attachment 52273
I see that more as an example of what connector to avoid, and/or how not to install it. The smoke damage from behind the plate would seem to indicate that the problem was in the j-box connection from the plug to the outlet, or from the outlet to the wiring. There was some serious resistive heating going on in there!
 

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Given that the cause of the burned outlet was a loose connection, it seems to me this is just as likely to occur with a hardwired connection as with a plug outlet. The electrician could just as likely have failed to adequately tighten a hardwired connection, right?

Years ago I upgraded the wiring in my house from 100A to 200A, which required installing a new meter box. I used aluminum cable for the main feed from the breaker box to the meter box. as is commonly done. The new meter was installed by a crew from our local power company as required. They are responsible for clamping the feed cable to the meter housing and installing the new meter (which is a plug-in). Everything went fine, but 6 months later when winter arrived, I started noticing the lights dimming throughout the house in the evenings! After some troubleshooting to eliminate internal causes, a utility crew came out and checked the meter box. They found that the aluminum cable had shrunk in the cold weather and was no longer clamped tightly enough within the meter box. They cinched down the clamps in the box on a cold evening, and I never saw another problem.
 

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Get a wall mart charger. It was a great decision for us to install the 240v charger as a plug-in. We thought we might be moving during the term of our Bolt lease, and indeed we did. We were able to have an electrician install a 240v/50A circuit (w/appropriate receptacle) in the new garage before moving.
The wiring for 50A is heavy duty. The max draw by your Bolt will never stress that circuit. Make sure your charging unit is firmly attached to the wall and not hanging by its 240v plug!
Enjoy the trouble-free, at-home charging!!
 

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Get a wall mart charger. It was a great decision for us to install the 240v charger as a plug-in. We thought we might be moving during the term of our Bolt lease, and indeed we did. We were able to have an electrician install a 240v/50A circuit (w/appropriate receptacle) in the new garage before moving.
The wiring for 50A is heavy duty. The max draw by your Bolt will never stress that circuit. Make sure your charging unit is firmly attached to the wall and not hanging by its 240v plug!
Enjoy the trouble-free, at-home charging!!
I meant "wall MOUNT charger" of course!!
(Darn that spelling corrector!)
 

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I believe many of the wall mounter chargers have ground fault built in to their circuitry. My Grizzl-e unit states that, and I would guess that any recommended for outside units would have it too. I have my unit set to 32 amp maxx on a 50 amp (6-3 cu ) service. That is quick enough charging and not pushing the wire and charger to its design limit seams smart to me. BTW the Grizzl-e refurbished unit I purchase is currently only $299 plus shipping . It appears new and is built like a tank
 

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As to the EVSE itself, I believe most hard-wired ones don't have GFI protection. They are the ones that would benefit a GFI branch, since they would have less compatibility vs plug-in EVSE with GFI branch.
I think the GFCI breaker requirement was added to the 2020 NEC because of the shock hazard present when plugging and unplugging the 14-50P and similar. It's not hard to be more focused on pulling the plug while wrapping your hand tighter and closer to the plug blades. The remaining fault hazard is handled by a hard-wired EVSE.
 

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They do. Most hard wired EVSEs share their internals with wired EVSEs.
FWIW my EVSE came with a (very short wire) 3-prong 240V plug. It also had complete instructions for replacement of that pigtail with a 4-prong, and for hard-wiring. The actual EVSE should be easily adaptable to any installation method.
 
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