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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a Clipper Creek 40 amp charger that will trip the GFI for my bathroom floor heater when both are in operation but not when only one is active. I've had 2 electricians look at the wiring in the service panel and both agree there are no problems there. I've added a rubber/plastic floor under the Bolt to add insulation with no change in results. The GFI circuit was swapped with another GFI circuit with no change in results. Lastly I had a Tesla S owner bring his car over to see if the car made a difference. Viola, the GFI did not trip and the Tesla pulled the full 40 amps through the charger. When the Bolt is charging my car, it only pulls between the 28 and 32 amps. It appears that the Bolt is sending some "noise" back through the charger. Is it a charger problem or a Bolt problem? Who do I contact at Chevy?
 

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I would think that the Clipper Creek would be the device modulating the current to supply the Bolt its required 32 amps. Or it's the other way around, where the car just draws the current it needs. But there's a potential difference in your testing scenario where one car is drawing the full amps and the other one is not.

Just jumped over to a Wikipedia on the SAE J1772 specifications to try and figure out which device controls the current.

Dang, would have to read it a few more times. Article talks about square waves, pulse width modulation, resisters, diodes, current loops, voltage control and stuff that goes on between the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) and the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE). There definitely looks like there is pulse width modulation (PWM) going on that might be causing noise on the circuit.
 

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I would think that the Clipper Creek would be the device modulating the current to supply the Bolt its required 32 amps. Or it's the other way around, where the car just draws the current it needs. But there's a potential difference in your testing scenario where one car is drawing the full amps and the other one is not.

Just jumped over to a Wikipedia on the SAE J1772 specifications to try and figure out which device controls the current.

Dang, would have to read it a few more times. Article talks about square waves, pulse width modulation, resisters, diodes, current loops, voltage control and stuff that goes on between the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) and the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE). There definitely looks like there is pulse width modulation (PWM) going on that might be causing noise on the circuit.
It doesn't matter if the charge station was capable of delivering 100 amps. The onboard charger only draws 32 amps maximum. It can reduce its draw, based on signals from the charge station telling it that it can only supply 8, 12, etc.

Folks keep referring to AC charge stations as chargers. Except for DC charging, the car uses an onboard AC to DC charger. All voltage modulation takes place in the onboard charger. The charge stations provide plain AC line voltage. They communicate with the charging system in the car about their allowed current draw.
 

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Folks keep referring to AC charge stations as chargers. Except for DC charging, the car uses an onboard AC to DC charger. All voltage modulation takes place in the onboard charger. The charge stations provide plain AC line voltage. They communicate with the charging system in the car about their allowed current draw.
Yes - the device on your garage wall or the "charge cord" that comes with the car (both of which are technically called "Electric Vehicle Service Equipment", or "EVSE") essentially act as a fancy switch. They provide a pilot signal to the car that advertises the maximum amount of current that the car is allowed to pull, and then they wait for an acknowledgement from the car. Then they basically just close a relay that energizes the charge cord. The EVSE doesn't do any processing of the AC line voltage going into the car - that's all done by the car's onboard AC charger.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
An electrician swapped one GFCI circuit with another in the panel and the "new" GFCI circuit with the floor heater also tripped when both are in use.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for clarifying the naming of the different devices. I am just amazed at how expensive the charging station is for what it does.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes - the device on your garage wall or the "charge cord" that comes with the car (both of which are technically called "Electric Vehicle Service Equipment", or "EVSE") essentially act as a fancy switch. They provide a pilot signal to the car that advertises the maximum amount of current that the car is allowed to pull, and then they wait for an acknowledgement from the car. Then they basically just close a relay that energizes the charge cord. The EVSE doesn't do any processing of the AC line voltage going into the car - that's all done by the car's onboard AC charger.
So you are saying the car is providing the "noise" back to the electrical panel through the EVSE that is causing the GFCI to trip?
 

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It doesn't matter if the charge station was capable of delivering 100 amps. The onboard charger only draws 32 amps maximum. It can reduce its draw, based on signals from the charge station telling it that it can only supply 8, 12, etc.

Folks keep referring to AC charge stations as chargers. Except for DC charging, the car uses an onboard AC to DC charger. All voltage modulation takes place in the onboard charger. The charge stations provide plain AC line voltage. They communicate with the charging system in the car about their allowed current draw.
So the fancy Tesla EVSE with all the connectors just tells the car what it can draw? And all the other fancy EVSE's that advertise setting all these different amps settings are just telling the car what to do? Geeze, what a gimmick.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Recap and GM's response:
2017 Chevrolet Bolt VIN 1G1FX6S02H4183226
Problem incurred: Unrelated GFCI tripping when car is charging
Service Panel Configuration prior to problem
200 amp service with 19 20 amp circuit breakers, 3 20 amp GFCI circuit breakers with one of those dedicated to a bathroom electric floor heater, 2 30 amp 220v dedicated circuits (one to the heat pump and the other to the clothes dryer), 1 50 amp 220v dedicated circuit to the electric range.
No problems were incurred with any of the circuits during our 15 years of residing in this house with the exception of a bathroom GFCI trip due to a hair dryer.
In October of 2017 a 60 amp dedicated circuit was installed in anticipation of plugging in a Clipper Creek charging station model HCS-50P for a 2017 Chevrolet Bolt to be purchased that month.
Problem Incurred
Upon charging the Bolt when the bathroom floor heater was drawing current, the GFCI on the floor heater would trip. When the Bolt was charging and the floor heater was not drawing current, no circuit breaker would trip. When the floor heater was drawing current and the Bolt was not charging, no circuit breaker would trip.
If I used the 110v charging station and cord provided by Chevrolet with the Bolt and plugged it into a garage receptacle and both the Bolt and floor heater were drawing current, the GFCI on the floor heater would trip. If only one was drawing current, no circuit breaker would trip.
Attempts to correct problem
Two GFCI circuits were swapped to see if the floor heater GFCI was faulty. The newly assigned GFCI to the floor heater would trip if that circuit and circuit to the charging station was drawing current at the same time.
Isolated the two circuits as much as possible within the service panel routing the grounds as close to the main ground as possible. No change in outcome was experienced.
Placed a rubber mat under the wheels of the Bolt. No change in outcome was experienced.
Installed a surge capacitor on charging station breaker. No change in outcome was experienced.
To test to see if the Clipper Creek charging station was the problem, a Tesla S was brought in and connected to the plug. The Tesla drew the maximum 40 amps and the floor heater GFCI DID NOT trip.
Took the Bolt to selling dealer (Bill Estes in Indianapolis) to have car checked out. Service department in conjunction with GM technical support determined that there were no charging diagnostics being generated.
Solution devised
A GFI receptacle was installed outside the service panel and tied into the floor heater circuit’s new standard 20 amp circuit breaker. Both circuits work in concert without any circuit breakers tripping.
Question to General Motors
Why does the Bolt charging system disruptive to my residential electrical system when the Tesla doesn’t? Is it my car or will all Bolts be disruptive to my residential electrical system? Is there a white paper on VDC charging system and associated interference issue?
GM's Response:
John, Sorry for the delays in this situation. I have forwarded all information to GM technical assistance. The case was updated and stated that since there was no DTC's and charging was ok on all dealer chargers that the situation is consider resolved. GM did not have any information on why the Bolt did not work and the Tesla did. Stating difference in technologies etc was the main factor. Sorry for not having any more information than that.
 

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Subscribed. Please let us know if you are able to get further details from GM Corporate and/or your electrician. Just to be clear, it's GFCI not AFCI?
 

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I would swap out the ground fault breaker, for a regular breaker, they swap out easily.

Just buy the same brand breaker it will be easy to change.
 

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Just asking... is the gfci wired properly? It is common to feed them on the load terminals. On a circuit by itself ? Is something else down stream from it causing the trip? Also electric code says you can only bond neutral and ground at one point - typically in main panel box never in a sub panel.
 

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Thanks for clarifying the naming of the different devices. I am just amazed at how expensive the charging station is for what it does.
I agree, but I had to laugh at that...sorry.

I recently purchased three of the Siemens VersiCharge EVSEs from Costco for $450 apiece. I thought they were a bargain.

As compared to "Back in the Day": I had to buy a "spare" Small Paddle Inductive (SPI) TAL charger for my RAV-4 EV in 2000, as owners were reporting an unnerving tendency of the earlier ones to fail. There was little-to-no public charging infrastructure in those days, so for all practical purposes, the RAV-4 EV was entirely dependent on home charging.

It cost over $3000. :eek:
 

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You are not supposed to put EVSE chargers on GFCI breakers. The reason is because the EVSE itself does checks for imbalanced circuits and shorts to ground as a matter of constant safety and this trips the GFCI breaker.

Put it on another circuit.
 

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You are not supposed to put EVSE chargers on GFCI breakers. The reason is because the EVSE itself does checks for imbalanced circuits and shorts to ground as a matter of constant safety and this trips the GFCI breaker.

Put it on another circuit.
I would believe it is expected to be on a GFCI circuit with the Bolt's 120V OEM included level 1 EVSE. Meant for residential use to simplify EV adoption. Just plug it in. It will work on a GFCI circuit.
 
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