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Discussion Starter #1
Good morning and Happy Labor Day!

I'm just about ready to pull the trigger and pick up a Bolt (with a B), but I'm trying to figure out how to approach Level 2 charging at home.

First off, will I be able to use a converter on my dryer outlet (NEMA 10-30?) pictured below so that I can use a Level 2 charger such as A ClipperCreek or JuiceBox? I'd really like to not replace it since we still use it for our dryer, I can live with having to unplug each as needed.

Is my panel up to par to use a Level 2 charger?
I snapped a photo of the panel below, specifically the dryer outlet breaker.

If I'm in over my head LET ME KNOW and I'll find a electrician. Just trying to say some $$$:D
 

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Yes, that dryer outlet will work fine with an adapter with an appropriate L2 EVSE.

Since it is a 30 amp receptacle you'll want an EVSE that draws 24 amps or less (the 80% rule) or can be set to draw 24 amps or less.

https://emotorwerks.com/store/residential/juicebox-40-40-amp-evse-with-24-foot-cable

That particular one can be purchased with exactly the adapter you need (10-30P) and while it would work at 24 amps at your house you could move it elsewhere and use it at up to 40 amps (using a 50 amp circuit)

Clipper Creek also sells a 24 amp EVSE, you would need to have an adapter made (should be able to purchase online) or have an electrician remove the connector that comes with it and install an 10-30P.
 

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I would never suggest you make a short adapter dogbone, for your included portable charger, from $30 worth of parts from Lowes...and charge at 240 v x 12 amp, or 2.8 kW x 10 hours a night for ~100+ miles a day.
 

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It is certainly possible to use the 10-30 outlet to power an EVSE.

Make sure the current receptacle is in top notch condition - poor connection at the receptacle/plug have been suspect in some garage fires. These outlets are not really designed for heavy duty plug/unplug cycles.

You have a 30 amp circuit, so your EVSE (the "charger" is built into the car) needs to be 24 A or less (80% of the circuit capacity since it is considered a continuous load).

The Juicebox can be set to a specified amperage, so it could be utilize a higher amperage circuit later on if your circumstances change. They also sell an adapter to connect to your 10-30R.

Clipper Creek sells a -30 model (they label their product based on the circuit and not EVSE power) that would supply 24 amps. If your circumstances change you would need to replace the unit to get quicker charging. They do not offer it with a 10-30, nor do they sell an adapter. You could use the one from Juicebox or another source. It might be cheaper to upgrade your current receptacle to a 14-30R and order the Clipper Creek with connector. You would then also need to replace the cord on your dryer of course.
 

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"Make sure the current receptacle is in top notch condition - poor connection at the receptacle/plug have been suspect in some garage fires."

Absolutely. The first time I tried using the portable charge cord, I checked the temperature of each part, by touch, every 15 minutes. After an hour, the wall socket felt warm. I quit charging, flipped the breaker, pulled the faceplate and socket, and found that the screw terminal on one of the wires was sightly loose. This had never shown up in decades of intermittent use. Tightening it solved the problem. After 10 hours this might have burned down our garage. Be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm going to need a almost a full charge nightly, thus it sounds like having an electrician put in a new dedicated outlet and 50AMP circuit would be safer and more beneficial for my situation.

Can anyone give me a ballpark estimate of that cost from a electrician? Hopefully I wouldn't need my panel upgraded...

Thanks for everyones input thus far.
 

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I'm going to need a almost a full charge nightly, thus it sounds like having an electrician put in a new dedicated outlet and 50AMP circuit would be safer and more beneficial for my situation.

Can anyone give me a ballpark estimate of that cost from a electrician? Hopefully I wouldn't need my panel upgraded...

Thanks for everyones input thus far.
The outlet is "50 amp capable" (overprotection), the circuit ("wires") need to be "40 amp capable" (just right), the breaker is "40 amp shut off" (must equal to or less than the wire ampacity), and the EVSE cannot "allow" more than 32 amps. (The Bolt draws only 32 amps @ 240V.) ONLY the "load" determines the amperage draw, not the breaker, wires, or outlet. These three are "rated" for protection from heat and fire. The EVSE "checks" the voltage and then "asks and checks" to see if the EV is ready to receive. The EV (at least the Bolt) can limit amperage to 8A or 12A IF the voltage is 120V.

The cost is usually "run (length of wires) dependent". Our Forum covers the USA & Canada and costs vary widely. You probably won't get by for less than US$300, but may pay as much as US$1200.
 

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Can you snap a pic of your whole panel, including the main breaker?

The closer you mount the receptacle to the panel, the lower the cost will be. A 50 amp breaker is $10, and about $2/foot for the wire. A 14-50r (receptacle) is about $10. Don't know what electrician labor rates are, since I've never hired one. I'd guess $100/hr. I installed my own for about $50, and about 45 minutes of labor. Mine was easy though since the breaker panel in the garage goes into an attic space that is easily accessible, and then I mounted the receptacle roughly in the middle of the garage ceiling.

You could wire the EVSE directly to the breaker, or install a receptacle and plug it in. If I were to get an EVSE, I'd probably go with the Juice Box since it's modular and has extra programming options.

How many amps is the included EVSE good for?
 

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I'm going to need a almost a full charge nightly, thus it sounds like having an electrician put in a new dedicated outlet and 50AMP circuit would be safer and more beneficial for my situation.

Can anyone give me a ballpark estimate of that cost from a electrician? Hopefully I wouldn't need my panel upgraded...

Thanks for everyones input thus far.
Cost to install depends a lot on where you are going to put your receptacle in relation to where your house electrical panel is and whether your existing electrical box has capacity and space for a new breaker. I've only had to deal with garages where the panel is on the outside of the garage wall and I can mount a receptacle on the other side of the wall inside the same set of studs. A typical cost for that with a low end 14-50R from your local Home Depot/Lowes and no need to move anything around in the electrical panel is about $250. If it is a DIY job it is about $50 for parts.

Once you start having to run conduit, drill through masonry, or put in a new electrical panel the number can be well past $1000.


Permits can run up the cost as well.

I don't bother with permits for my other-side-of-the-wall installations. If someone flags it or cares when I go to sell the house it is a 10 minute job to pull the breaker and wiring.
 

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"How many amps is the included EVSE good for?"

When run off 120 volts, the default setting on the dash is 8 amps. But you can set it to 12 amps. When running it on 240 volts, it defaults to 12 amps.
 

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The outlet is "50 amp capable" (overprotection), the circuit ("wires") need to be "40 amp capable" (just right), the breaker is "40 amp shut off" (must equal the wires), and the EVSE cannot "allow" more than 32 amps. (The Bolt draws only 32 amps @ 240V.) ONLY the "load" determines the amperage draw, not the breaker, wires, or outlet. These three are "rated" for protection from heat and fire. The EVSE "checks" the voltage and then "asks and checks" to see if the EV is ready to receive. The EV (at least the Bolt) can limit amperage to 8Aor 12A IF the voltage is 120V.

The cost is usually "run (length of wires) dependent". Our Forum covers the USA & Canada and costs vary widely. You probably won't get by for less than US$300, but may pay as much as US$1200.
The wires are the biggest hassle/cost to run. Put in heavier wire now. It's minimal extra cost and if you buy a 40 amp capable EVSE you'll be able to charge a future EV a bit faster if it supports 40 amp charging.

Unless there is good reason not to, I'd match a 14-50R with a 50 amp breaker and 6 gauge wire. 8 gauge wire has 50% more resistance than 6 gauge wire. Not that it is a big number but with a 50' run between the electrical panel and the EVSE that's about 30 watts per hour of heating (wasted energy) in the wiring at 32 amps Go green and save some energy for an investment in a bit more copper. The saved energy flows into your battery with thicker wiring.

Who knows, a friend with a Tesla might come visit and will appreciate being able to plug in their EVSE without mucking with their settings to ensure they are charging at no more than 32 amps.
 

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I'm going to need a almost a full charge nightly, thus it sounds like having an electrician put in a new dedicated outlet and 50AMP circuit would be safer and more beneficial for my situation.

Can anyone give me a ballpark estimate of that cost from a electrician? Hopefully I wouldn't need my panel upgraded...

Thanks for everyones input thus far.
From the pic you posted of your panel, and the fact that you already have a two 120V circuits sharing with the dryer breaker---
You likely have 100A service and you are probably looking at a significant expense to upgrade your main panel to 200A and make room for an additional 40A 240V circuit (physical and total load).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Can you snap a pic of your whole panel, including the main breaker?

The closer you mount the receptacle to the panel, the lower the cost will be. A 50 amp breaker is $10, and about $2/foot for the wire. A 14-50r (receptacle) is about $10. Don't know what electrician labor rates are, since I've never hired one. I'd guess $100/hr. I installed my own for about $50, and about 45 minutes of labor. Mine was easy though since the breaker panel in the garage goes into an attic space that is easily accessible, and then I mounted the receptacle roughly in the middle of the garage ceiling.

You could wire the EVSE directly to the breaker, or install a receptacle and plug it in. If I were to get an EVSE, I'd probably go with the Juice Box since it's modular and has extra programming options.

How many amps is the included EVSE good for?
Here are additional photos of my panel. Interesting enough the last photo is of an old panel directly on the other side of the wall in my garage, where I would want to put the EVSE. Maybe that could be of benefit? Probably not, I assume.

Doesn't look like I have much space for anything else in the panel to add a 50 amp breaker:( Perhaps I can replace the dying electrical dryer with a gas dryer? That'd free up the space I need in the panel, right? :nerd:
 

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From the pic you posted of your panel, and the fact that you already have a two 120V circuits sharing with the dryer breaker---
You likely have 100A service and you are probably looking at a significant expense to upgrade your main panel to 200A and make room for an additional 40A 240V circuit (physical and total load).

Looks like he has physical room but plenty of opportunities to pop his main breaker.

I see range, dryer and A/C (not in pic) which are a combined 110A or maybe 100A if the A/C is 30A, plus two shared breaker 20A and four 15A breakers for lighting. Either of the two adjacent 15A breakers could be combined into a 15/50/15 breaker so plenty of room.

Problem is of the four major power draws (dryer, range, A/C, EVSE) you can only have 3 on at the same time. Plus 3 on at the same time and much of a load on any of the 15/20A circuits (like a blow dryer) and you'll pop the main breaker. The range/dryer and A/C only run intermittently (not continuous draw) so you probably can get away with those right now even though you are right at the 100A limit.

You might be able to make it work by setting the Bolt to only charge during hours when you are sure you won't be cooking or running the clothes dryer. Or just don't cook AND run the dryer at the same time. Or a combination of only charging from 9pm till 6am (9 hours should fully charge you) AND try to remember to not cook AND run the dryer at night.

Or spend $1000+ to upgrade your service panel.
 

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This service entrance panel shows a 100 amp service disconnect, indicating 100 amp service to the distribution. You are, most likely, unable to add a 40 amp designated circuit. I don't know how much it would cost to change to 200 amp service. As someone else said, the clothes dryer breakers are already being "shared". You may need to look carefully at your schedule and try to charge at 120V 12 amp.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yes, that dryer outlet will work fine with an adapter with an appropriate L2 EVSE.

Since it is a 30 amp receptacle you'll want an EVSE that draws 24 amps or less (the 80% rule) or can be set to draw 24 amps or less.

https://emotorwerks.com/store/residential/juicebox-40-40-amp-evse-with-24-foot-cable

That particular one can be purchased with exactly the adapter you need (10-30P) and while it would work at 24 amps at your house you could move it elsewhere and use it at up to 40 amps (using a 50 amp circuit)

Clipper Creek also sells a 24 amp EVSE, you would need to have an adapter made (should be able to purchase online) or have an electrician remove the connector that comes with it and install an 10-30P.
Based on everyone's feedback, it appears this is my best solution. No changes would be necessary upon purchasing JuiceBox and 10-30P adapter correct? I'll probably invest in the Dryer Buddy splitter as well.

Since I am only going to be able to utilize 24 amps on this receptacle, will I be able to get a full charge (presumably from 0%) in 9 hours?

No dryer usage while I'm charging the EV. :)

I can't thank all of you enough! :)
 

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Truthstar: 24 amps usually provides ~ 17+ mpch (miles per charging hour). {16 amps = 10+ mpch; 32 amps = 24+ mpch} 17 mpch for 9 hrs = 153 miles and 18 mpch for 9 hrs = 162 miles. You are never going to come in empty, but unless you arrive at your EVSE with a fair reserve, you will NOT be able to fully charge in 9 hours. IF you can arrange 12 hours "on the plug", you may put 210 miles on board. If you can get home with 28 miles to spare, you "may" consider that a full charge. If either condition cannot be met, you will need to charge at work to make it a viable plan.
 

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This service entrance panel shows a 100 amp service disconnect, indicating 100 amp service to the distribution. You are, most likely, unable to add a 40 amp designated circuit. I don't know how much it would cost to change to 200 amp service. As someone else said, the clothes dryer breakers are already being "shared". You may need to look carefully at your schedule and try to charge at 120V 12 amp.
The dryer breaker isn't really being "shared" it's just jamming 4 breakers into the space that 2 full size breakers occupy. With two of the breakers (the 30A ones) tied together so if either leg draws too much current both legs disconnect. It's pretty uncommon to use full size breakers any longer (for 15/20A circuits)

Any two of the adjacent full size 15A breakers can be replaced with a breaker that looks just like the dryer breaker. It would have two 15A breakers and two 50A breakers in a single breaker package with the two 50A breakers tied together. Or a 15/40/40/15 breaker if you want to go with a 40A circuit to the EVSE. That all four breakers are in a single package doesn't mean the 50A portion isn't a dedicated circuit. It is. They are only connected on the service panel bus bars, as are all the breakers (well some are on one leg of the 240V, others on the other leg).
 
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