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Recently got my Bolt kind of unexpectedly. Want to install a home charging station now. Just want to see what's the average cost of installation is. The problem is my electrical panel is in the basement on the opposite side of the house relative to the garage. Got a couple of quote over the phone for around $2000. I know that government has a rebate for up to $500. Still sounds like a lot.
 

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charger hardware varies from $300-$1000 depending - but labor and electrical upgrades are the variable that is outside anyone's control - it all depends on your situation and the state of your home's electrical system to handle a high AMP 240 volt circuit...

my opinion is do it only once - therefore buy/install the biggest/best EV charger you can for future EV's - since the major cost is not the installer but rather the labor and the upgrade to your home to have the wire/breaker/panel to handle any 240 volt circuit - $2000 is high but not unreasonable for a longer distance install from your main panel.

The bolt can charge at 32 amps which requires a 40 amp breaker - anything bigger than that is non necessary, but may be beneficial for a future EV that can charge at a faster rate...

most chargers are either

16 amps (20 amp circuit breaker)
24 amps (30 amp circuit breaker)
32 amps (40 amp circuit breaker)
40 amps (50 amp circuit breaker)
48 amps (60 amp circuit breaker)
80 amps (100 amp circuit breaker)

ClipperCreek makes all the sizes listed above - the sweet spot for prince is the 48/60 charger at $799
 

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Recently got my Bolt kind of unexpectedly. Want to install a home charging station now. Just want to see what's the average cost of installation is. The problem is my electrical panel is in the basement on the opposite side of the house relative to the garage. Got a couple of quote over the phone for around $2000. I know that government has a rebate for up to $500. Still sounds like a lot.
When you mention it is for an EVSE the price doubles. Get quotes for a 240V dedicated 40 amp circuit to a NEMA 50A outlet in the garage. Buy a plug-in model EVSE. Your total outlay (EVSE + circuit) should be <$1500. {I bought the Siemens VersiCharge from Home Depot for <$500. I installed a 40 amp 10-2 w/G circuit to a NEMA 6-50 outlet for <$50. [A long "run" will necessitate 8-2 w/G wire, which WILL cost more.] Mine WAS a short 3' run from the service panel, but this should not be a $2000 job for the circuit itself!}
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Recently got my Bolt kind of unexpectedly. Want to install a home charging station now. Just want to see what's the average cost of installation is. The problem is my electrical panel is in the basement on the opposite side of the house relative to the garage. Got a couple of quote over the phone for around $2000. I know that government has a rebate for up to $500. Still sounds like a lot.
When you mention it is for an EVSE the price doubles. Get quotes for a 240V dedicated 40 amp circuit to a NEMA 50A outlet in the garage. Buy a plug-in model EVSE. Your total outlay (EVSE + circuit) should be
The only problem is I need an inspection to apply for rebate. That?s probably why they want more including the inspection.
 

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Got a couple of quote over the phone for around $2000. I know that government has a rebate for up to $500. Still sounds like a lot.
I had a 40 amp circuit installed for my charger, with the socket probably 60 feet from the breaker panel in a position similar to yours by the sound of it. I paid about $340 including tip for the work, and it took a couple of hours to do. I paid about $500 for the Chargepoint home charger from Amazon, which plugged into the NEMA 6-50 socket installed by the electrician. So, total cost less than $900 including the charger.
 

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For the installation portion only excluding the charging station itself. I spent $338 materials + $324 labor + $89 electrical safety authority certificate + $97 HST, total $848 Canadian dollars.

This included 26 metres (85-feet) of 6/3 cable running from the electrical service panel in the basement to the 240v outlet in the garage. Other than an additional panel breaker and the 240v outlet no other upgrades were needed. I probably saved a couple of hundred bucks by running/fishing the cable myself (due to my sensitivity about cable routing). As agreed in advance with my licensed electrician who gave me some tips, and he completed the job including arranging for the safety certificate needed for the gov’t rebate application.

I could have gotten away with 8 gauge wire rather than using 6 gauge. But after looking at Tesla’s install instructions and thinking about future-proofing I decided to go heavy.

I didn’t come close to rgmichel’s low install cost. But will feel a little better once my $424 (50%) electric vehicle charging incentive rebate cheque arrives.
 

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my opinion is do it only once - therefore buy/install the biggest/best EV charger you can for future EV's - since the major cost is not the installer but rather the labor and the upgrade to your home to have the wire/breaker/panel to handle any 240 volt circuit - $2000 is high but not unreasonable for a longer distance install from your main panel.
The charger isn't the biggest issue in the OP's case, IMHO - it's the wire run. The labour cost is all in running the wiring, so go with the largest gauge wire you can. If you install wire that's suitable for 100A service, you can still install a 40A breaker and a 32A EVSE. And doing so could save you from having to upgrade your panel. But if you want to upgrade in the future you won't have to pay the lion's share of the labour bill to have the wiring upgraded again.
 

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When you mention it is for an EVSE the price doubles.
If looking for the lowest bid - I think solar panel installs around here are now done by semi-skilled crews with final hookup and signoff by a licensed electrician. Routing and bending conduit to get over to the EVSE outlet will be most of the labor hours in this instance. That's not rocket surgery.

I wonder if a solar install specialist might bid the job cheaper than a traditional electrical contractor and thereby avoid the 'exotic' EVSE premium.
 

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bid the two jobs separating - there is _NO_ magic to installing an EVSE - hardwired - ground + two hots - do it with the breaker off...

just get a bid for running a 100 amp (or smaller) sub-panel to the garage and leave it at that - installing an EVSE once you have a sub panel with an empty breaker slot is a 2-4 hour job tops - well in scope for a weekend warrior - the hard part is the modifications to the main panel, and the actually running/routing of the high amp wire to the garage.
 

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bid the two jobs separating - there is _NO_ magic to installing an EVSE - hardwired - ground + two hots - do it with the breaker off...

just get a bid for running a 100 amp (or smaller) sub-panel to the garage and leave it at that - installing an EVSE once you have a sub panel with an empty breaker slot is a 2-4 hour job tops - well in scope for a weekend warrior - the hard part is the modifications to the main panel, and the actually running/routing of the high amp wire to the garage.

VERY good advice, which applies to many of the posts from new Bolt owners. In a 200 amp house, is a 100A sub-panel too much? Do you have to change the entire MAIN panel capability to 300A? Would a 50A sub-panel do the job ("borrowing" 50A) and not overload the Main? Does "turning on" a sub-panel this large "turn off" some of the rest of the Main load (such as clothes dryer or hot water heater)?
 

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In a 200 amp house, is a 100A sub-panel too much?
I would suggest that you don't have to actually ask for a 100A sub-panel to be installed. Tell the electrician you want a 60A sub-panel but with a wiring run that would allow it to be expanded to 100A in the future. That way you can defer any issues a 100A panel might raise until later, while avoiding the expensive cost of another wiring upgrade should you ever need that much power.

Oh, and by the way - if this involves anything exotic like trenching you might as well get your money's worth and ask them to install an ethernet or fibre optic cable while they're down there. You might as well get secure Internet connectivity while you're at it.
 

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I would have thought that running the wire for a sub-panel would be significantly more expensive than running a wire for a socket from the existing panel. The sub-panel itself is an extra cost, the wire would be more expensive, then you have to do the hookup for the charger. While I am not against the idea of a sub-panel, if we are trying to do minimum cost a 40-50 amp wire, breaker, and a socket is all that's needed for a Bolt.
 

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I would have thought that running the wire for a sub-panel would be significantly more expensive than running a wire for a socket from the existing panel.
It depends on the circumstances. In my case the socket would have to go in a detached garage that already has its own 30A sub-panel. To get a 32A breaker in there the sub-panel and the feed to it would have to be upgraded.
 

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Cat 5e or cat 6 is all you need pull two or three - wire is cheap!
You forgot a "j/k" or "/sarcasm" tag. Anyone reading this, please do not use Cat 5e or 6 for wiring an EVSE outlet. The Cat 5e/6 will catch on fire if you try to shove 1000Watts through it.

Or were you suggesting the Cat 5e/6 as a pull rope? In that case, I'd just use actual rope to pull the thicker 4 to 8 AWG wire through conduit.
 

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You forgot a "j/k" or "/sarcasm" tag. Anyone reading this, please do not use Cat 5e or 6 for wiring an EVSE outlet. The Cat 5e/6 will catch on fire if you try to shove 1000Watts through it.

Or were you suggesting the Cat 5e/6 as a pull rope? In that case, I'd just use actual rope to pull the thicker 4 to 8 AWG wire through conduit.

I was suggesting pulling Cat 5e/6 in addition to what ever high voltage wire you need to pull - so you have hardwired networking in the garage along with your new EVSE.
 

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You forgot a "j/k" or "/sarcasm" tag. Anyone reading this, please do not use Cat 5e or 6 for wiring an EVSE outlet.
Yeah, he was responding to my point about the installation costs of having to dig a trench to reach a detached garage. If you're going to pay for the work of installing a buried power line so you can increase the capacity of the sub panel, you might as well kill two birds with one stone by getting them to run some network cabling out there at the same time.

<j/k>Might as well make it fibre optic so you can do real time disk mirroring to a garage server for "offsite" backup!!!</j/k>
 

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I was suggesting pulling Cat 5e/6 in addition to what ever high voltage wire you need to pull - so you have hardwired networking in the garage along with your new EVSE.
I was always told that the worse thing you can do is run power and a data line for long distances in parallel next to each other. I always tried to run my cat 5 at least 2 feet away and if I crossed a power line, would do it at right angles.
 

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I was always told that the worse thing you can do is run power and a data line for long distances in parallel next to each other. I always tried to run my cat 5 at least 2 feet away and if I crossed a power line, would do it at right angles.
That was certainly true for audio cables because the 60Hz power would induce a strong hum in the signal. But networks run at such high frequencies I can't imaging that would be a problem. Induced power might be, though.

But I've love to hear any authoritative info anyone has to share about the subject.
 
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