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Small city car. Nice for its intended purpose, but for most folks, a range of (a real) 200 miles would likely be a minimum requirement.


For example, I charge my Bolt every couple of days, up to 75% (+200 miles on the GOM). When the GOM shows me around 1/2 charge remaining (about 100 miles left), is when I plug the car back in. Just a piece of mind thing.



Rich
 

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Looks cute (too cute for my tastes, but still)...
Great for a city car. (Probably wouldn't sell in the US, even that it might be fine for bigger cities, which is why they won't release it here.)
Although, the possible prices I've heard seemed way too high for that range...

But who knows. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'd be interested if the price was $19,000. Why a small commuter needs to cost so much is beyond me.

125 mile "minimum" range can be interpreted any way. If you consider Wisconsin winters as the minimum, then you're looking at a 250 mile EPA range.

What I want is a $19,000 EV with a 40 kWh battery. Don't really care what it looks like as long as the shape serves a purpose such as aerodynamics or cargo space.
 

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What I want is a $19,000 EV with a 40 kWh battery. Don't really care what it looks like as long as the shape serves a purpose such as aerodynamics or cargo space.
Everyone says this.. and then they pass on the Bolt because it's "Fine car, good range, decent value but ugly so I want a Tesla." Or they buy these 'cute' cars like this or the Mini EV that's coming, and then say "EVs suck because they have no range".
 

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Everyone says this.. and then they pass on the Bolt because it's "Fine car, good range, decent value but ugly so I want a Tesla." Or they buy these 'cute' cars like this or the Mini EV that's coming, and then say "EVs suck because they have no range".
Yeah. Reminds me of people I knew back in the day that SWORE they cared about a date's personality first, and kept dating beautiful meanspirited hateful people.

Personally I think the Honda E is adorable, and has a fun design.

The problem is that when /I/ think this, it usually means the device is going to be hated by most 'normal' people. Which is fair. Opinions vary, sometimes consistently.
 

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Everyone says this.. and then they pass on the Bolt because it's "Fine car, good range, decent value but ugly so I want a Tesla."
Chevrolet Spark, a subcompact car, is GM Korea's best selling car. Unfortunately, due to its popularity and somewhat similar design/style, a lot of Koreans mistake Bolt EV as a Spark. So the saying goes, "Fine car, good range, decent value, but looks like a Spark, so I want a (Hyundai) Kona."
 

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Chevrolet Spark, a subcompact car, is GM Korea's best selling car. Unfortunately, due to its popularity and somewhat similar design/style, a lot of Koreans mistake Bolt EV as a Spark. So the saying goes, "Fine car, good range, decent value, but looks like a Spark, so I want a (Hyundai) Kona."
Just curious but... are Koreans generally more 'practically driven' than Americans?, which is something no one ever mistakes us for being as a group. We choose form over functionality almost every time if given an equal choice. Impractical but sexy at the sacrifice of comfort or price in order to impress or keep up with the Joneses.

I'm wondering if the reason the Spark is the best selling EV is that it's probably the most practical vehicle (size for the country's roads/space, price, dependability, etc) rather than Koreans think it's an 'attractive' car... which is the main thing Americans seem to discount vehicles on.


If we donated a dollar to the National Debt every time someone in the USA claims "I don't care about looks" in a society like ours where it's practically a staple when rejecting things that make sense because of appearance, we'd have no deficit.
 

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Everyone says this.. and then they pass on the Bolt because it's "Fine car, good range, decent value but ugly so I want a Tesla." Or they buy these 'cute' cars like this or the Mini EV that's coming, and then say "EVs suck because they have no range".
Speaking of the US mass market, it's the size that counts. the Bolt, as I have opined before, needs to be at least 2" wider and 8" longer to register with US buyers as a sufficiently roomy, versatile car.

The EPA range of 240 miles/charge would be plenty enough, but the "90 miles in 30 minutes" on L3 (which is 50 miles in cold weather, and if you can find a working DCFC along your route) is clearly a major hindrance for the Bolt and other non-Tesla EV's.

Finally, the Bolt, at least its 2017 version has a whole bouquet of little, but annoying design stupidities and quality problems that should quietly go away if GM's EV is to become a commercially successful product.
 

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Just curious but... are Koreans generally more 'practically driven' than Americans?, which is something no one ever mistakes us for being as a group. We choose form over functionality almost every time if given an equal choice. Impractical but sexy at the sacrifice of comfort or price in order to impress or keep up with the Joneses.

I'm wondering if the reason the Spark is the best selling EV is that it's probably the most practical vehicle (size for the country's roads/space, price, dependability, etc) rather than Koreans think it's an 'attractive' car... which is the main thing Americans seem to discount vehicles on.


If we donated a dollar to the National Debt every time someone in the USA claims "I don't care about looks" in a society like ours where it's practically a staple when rejecting things that make sense because of appearance, we'd have no deficit.
No, I don't believe that to be the case. Koreans are just as prone to the "keep up with the Joneses (Kims?)" syndrome and this has led to the popularity of large sedans (and more recently, SUVs) in the market despite the reality of cramped roads and parking spaces. Hyundai Sonata has been consistently ranked at the top (or near that) for decades, even ahead of the smaller Avante (a.k.a. Elantra / Lantra) by a noticeable margin. If practicality was a higher priority, then in the very least, the Elantras should have been faring better.

As a side note, I can tell you that American-style pickup trucks are virtually non-existent here. For the trucking needs, small cabover style trucks sell well here, like the Hyundai Porter series. Porter 2 outsold Sonatas last month to take the top spot, by the way.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyundai_Porter

Anyways, the reason why the Spark is the most popular car sold by GM Korea is because it's a continuation of the well-liked subcompact car lineage in Korea - Tico and Matiz - from Daewoo Motors, the second to third largest car manufacturer in Korea in the 1990s. While its larger sedans trailed the offerings from the consistent market leader Hyundai, Daewoo's subcompacts proved to be so popular that other companies never gained a proper foothold in the segment, even to this day. Unfortunately, the financial crisis that hit South Korea in 1997 took a big toll for the parent company and Daewoo Motors was eventually acquired by GM in 2001. It was later renamed to GM Daewoo, and is nowadays called GM Korea.

Long story short, it's about the only car from GM Korea that doesn't have a direct competitor in the Korean market. That sort of niche is primarily what keeps GM Korea afloat these days. Similar thing happened to Bolt EV last year for the long-range EV segment, when Hyundai Kona and Kia Niro came into the market late - May and July, respectively. GM Korea took pre-orders of Bolt in January, and it completely sold out in three hours since there was no economical alternative for a 200+ mile EV at the time. Tesla Model S was selling for about three times the price of Bolt after the incentives, after all. This year though, Kona is absolutely dominating and thus the sales of Bolt have suffered. Unless GM Korea has some hefty discounts planned, I don't see it meeting the annual sales goal.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just curious but... are Koreans generally more 'practically driven' than Americans?, which is something no one ever mistakes us for being as a group. We choose form over functionality almost every time if given an equal choice. Impractical but sexy at the sacrifice of comfort or price in order to impress or keep up with the Joneses.
Of course, the proper level of analysis is at the individual level. That said, from what I know of Korean culture, they are at least as prone to image/status as the US. They have by far the most cosmetic surgeries per capita of any other country, which by definition is for vanity.

OK, well vanity isn't entirely in vain. Projecting an image has real world consequences. Looking better can attract people that normally wouldn't have been attracted. Better looking people tend to be treated more kindly and make more money... and we all know driving a cool car is one way for a guy to attract women.

My Korean friend is among the least vain people I know, but his wife is one of the more vain people. That's my worthless anecdote for the day.
 

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Anyways, the reason why the Spark is the most popular car sold by GM Korea is because it's a continuation of the well-liked subcompact car lineage in Korea - Tico and Matiz
.
I think it would make a lot of sense for GM to just move Bolt's production to Korea and be done with it already. The manufacturing costs would go down, the quality - up, the tariffs - away. Geez, GM could even cut a distribution deal with Hyundai to sell into the huge markets like India or Europe where GM doesn't have its own dealers' networks. For compliance purposes GM can import the strictly necessary amount of Bolts into the US, and focus on developing the glorious 100K super-truck they have always wanted. :D
 
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