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UPDATE: Just took the Bolt on a road trip....LA to Vegas....with the new "non-run flat" tires, and the car was downright comfortable. The run-flat ride is the equivalent of riding on rocks. :D
 

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Thanks for your input.
So much for the rumors that the 2022 suspension has been revised. I’m looking forward to test driving a EUV to see if it rides better and has more comfortable seats.
A Consumer Reports Talking Cars video mentioned their first impressions of the Bolt EUV including suspension changes that made the ride better but the handling worse, compared to the previous Bolt EV that they tested in 2017. If true, perhaps the suspension was made softer in the EUV but not the EV?

Chief Engineer For Chevrolet Bolt Says Performance And Electric Go Hand In Hand indicates that the chief engineer for the Bolt aimed for making a "hot hatch" that happened to be electric, which presumably explains the firm suspension.
 

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UPDATE: Just took the Bolt on a road trip....LA to Vegas....with the new "non-run flat" tires, and the car was downright comfortable. The run-flat ride is the equivalent of riding on rocks. :D
I just want to point out here that the OEM tires that come with the Bolt are NOT run-flats. If the tires go flat and you try to drive on them then you'll destroy them.

The OEM Michelin tires are "self-seal" - the design is to have them seal any leak automatically so that the tire retains pressure. If pressure is lost, then you need repair or replace the tire before moving the vehicle.
 

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I was given a similar size and tread Michelin as a temporary replacement should one of the originals be destroyed. I carry a refill kit in the car. GM gets a bunch of bucks for a kit similar to Slime or others easily found at garage sales for a fiver.
 

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I just want to point out here that the OEM tires that come with the Bolt are NOT run-flats. If the tires go flat and you try to drive on them then you'll destroy them.

The OEM Michelin tires are "self-seal" - the design is to have them seal any leak automatically so that the tire retains pressure. If pressure is lost, then you need repair or replace the tire before moving the vehicle.
I almost made the same comment, but then saw that Trackjack had used the correct terminology in a previous post, so I figured they know the difference and just used the wrong terminology by accident in the later post.

I always use the tires that come on my vehicles until they wear out, because I'm frugal, but then I head to TireRack and look at tire ratings to determine what would be the best fit for my intended driving conditions.
 

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I almost made the same comment, but then saw that Trackjack had used the correct terminology in a previous post, so I figured they know the difference and just used the wrong terminology by accident in the later post.
Yeah, I realized that he knew what it was, but wanted to avoid leaving other folks reading the thread with the potentially dangerous wrong idea.
 

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Most of the threads here that address tires, wheels, and suspension are aimed at better handling, with a lot coming from our knowledgeable autocross folks.

I have a different aim: At 77 years old, I'm interested in making my Bolt much more forgiving of potholes. I mostly drive around on city streets these days. Range isn't an issue.

Reading the forum, I bought some 16" wheels that are 4 lbs. lighter than stock. For tires, I chose Michelin Crossclimate2' in 215/55R16 97H XL.
This setup has improved the ride as well as the handling. Although I notice a bit more road noise from the tread between 15 and 30 mph, overall I'm pleased with the softer ride, and don't miss the tires' chirping under acceleration and complaining in corners. These tires just seem to hold a line better, inspiring more confidence. (I have been known to hoon occasionally.)

But the tires and less unsprung weight can do only so much. They more effectively soak up the small bumps and dips, like from patched pavement, but the car still pounds me when driven over anything more pronounced.

Reading that the 2020 Bolts have a softer suspension, I'm wondering how I could go about tinkering with the 2017 suspension. Are the 2020 suspension components interchangeable with mine? Is their any place in the aftermarket where I can look for softer springs and shocks? Inquiring butts want to know!
With the same short wheelbase as a Hyundai Kona (with tiny back seat) and the weight of a V6 Camry, and wheels/tires much smaller than the Toyota, the factory rightfully calls for 39# inflation or higher to carry the weight without bending/breaking the wheels. I worry about reducing tire pressure to a level that would not carry the load. Where that is, I don't know. New wheels are damned expensive, well over $200 used even on ebay. The VW ID.4, a size larger than the Bolt, is half a ton heavier, and average for a Ford F-150!
 
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