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My understanding that we must park outside and set 90% limit - not either one but both. Question why?
Read the statement again. It says, if you can't figure out how to set your Bolt to hilltop/90% do this, not when you do.

If you have a 2017 or 2018 model-year Bolt EV:

• Change the vehicle charge settings to use the Hill Top Reserve option

If you have a 2019 model-year Bolt EV:

• Change the vehicle charge settings to enable Target Charge Level at 90%

If you are unable to successfully make these changes, or do not feel comfortable making these changes
, we ask you to not park your car in your garage or carport until after you have visited your dealer.
 

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Read the statement again. It says, if you can't figure out how to set your Bolt to hilltop/90% do this, not when you do.

If you have a 2017 or 2018 model-year Bolt EV:

• Change the vehicle charge settings to use the Hill Top Reserve option

If you have a 2019 model-year Bolt EV:

• Change the vehicle charge settings to enable Target Charge Level at 90%

If you are unable to successfully make these changes, or do not feel comfortable making these changes, we ask you to not park your car in your garage or carport until after you have visited your dealer.
Thanks for clrification
 

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Preliminary reports are that Raw SOC is what is reduced to 90% and you can only have charged to ~96.5% at full, pre recall, so only ~6.5% is theoretically lost. Yes that still sucks, but it sucks approximately 35% less than what we initially figured.

Edit: I was mistaken. Raw SOC at full charge is 95%, not 96.5%.
I see 96.1% on mine. Be interesting to see how much variance there is.
 

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I see 96.1% on mine. Be interesting to see how much variance there is.

SOC can change after it finishes charging. The battery cools down, and the lithium ions shuffle around in the lattice.

1605806272116.png

I always liked the analogy of people rushing into a theater. They are all piled up at the entrance, in the aisle, when the curtain goes up, but eventually they all find a seat.
 

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My understanding that we must park outside and set 90% limit - not either one but both. Question why?
Nope, I read the alert to clearly say either limit to 90% or park outside. You do not have to do both. I don't know how they know this, because the overall description of the issue is very hand-wavy, vague, and clearly unclear, but that's what I believe it said: Either 90%, OR outside.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
It's not just about worrying whether my particular allegedly defective battery pack will burst into flames at any moment. It's about the fact that the short term "fix" is really just a SWAG, because the engineer in the video clearly says they don't really know yet what's wrong or why it's happening. They merely hope this "90% charge fix" will prevent anymore fires. What this is really about at this moment is that I'm stuck with a defective, crippled, at least temporarily worthless car, and that nobody in their right mind should be buying one right now. Sure, I can drive it, though not as far. Sure, it looks the same as it did before the recall, but now I have a worthless hunk of metal that I couldn't sell even if I wanted to. In the meantime, it's crippled in that the maximum range has been cut by at least 10%. I've used the entirety of that 100% range on a couple of occasions, coasting into my driveway on spare electrons, and plugging it in immediately. So, don't make light of this. It's my defective crippled car, it's my wallet, and it's my perspective of what GM had done to me as a a result. Think I'm buying another GM car any time soon, as in ever? Not bloody likely, unless I get a new battery pack and a certificate saying my car is 100% awesome and that it's full retail value is unaffected by this nonsense.
Or, you could just drive your Bolt and enjoy all it has to offer. Great efficiency, fun one-pedal driving, easy maneuverability and lots of tech. I have confidence GM will make smart moves here... the PR risk is just too great otherwise as they are on the cusp of electrifying their fleet even faster than they originally planned. Your Bolt isn't worthless at all... just hold off on charging over 90% for the time being and drive it.
 

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Why in the world the owners could not file class action lawsuite and get money back and move on? Anyone knows of such collective action?
GM has admitted a problem and proposed a timeframe for a remedy. Legal proceedings would take longer than the proposed time frame for a remedy. A judge wouldn't go forward with a suit to compensate the problem until GM had been given sufficient time to provide the remedy.

It's like if a yard maintenance worker accidentally broke a sprinkler and said he had to complete work at other customers houses, but would come by tomorrow to fix it. It wouldn't make sense to file a lawsuit until after a reasonable timeframe to fix it has passed.

We live by grace.
 

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Or, you could just drive your Bolt and enjoy all it has to offer. Great efficiency, fun one-pedal driving, easy maneuverability and lots of tech. I have confidence GM will make smart moves here... the PR risk is just too great otherwise as they are on the cusp of electrifying their fleet even faster than they originally planned. Your Bolt isn't worthless at all... just hold off on charging over 90% for the time being and drive it.
After chatting directly with the Chevrolet EV Concierge line, I'm feeling a whole lot more optimistic that they are going to do their best here and they seem to be planning to do the right thing - anywhere from a buyback to a new battery pack. We've told them we'd opt for the latter, assuming the new pack meets or exceeds the specs of the original system.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
After chatting directly with the Chevrolet EV Concierge line, I'm feeling a whole lot more optimistic that they are going to do their best here and they seem to be planning to do the right thing - anywhere from a buyback to a new battery pack. We've told them we'd opt for the latter, assuming the new pack meets or exceeds the specs of the original system.
Glad to hear you're feeling a bit better about it! I first leased a 2013 Volt, then leased a 2017 Bolt, and I just turned that in for a 2020 Bolt lease a few weeks ago. My attitude has been that while I feel GM has overengineered both the Volt and the Bolt (particularly the Gen 1 Volt... it was a total tank), we're still in the early adopter phase of EVs and there will undoubtedly be situations like this. QC issues from battery suppliers using cutting edge technologies isn't a huge surprise to me, and has reinforced my decision to lease. My new lease is only $162/month for a 2020 LT. Chevy might as well have given it to me for free at that cost. I'm thankful there's such an affordable high-quality EV on the market today and agree with @redpoint5 that giving some grace seems reasonable right now.

In another thread, I'm reading that GM has given a rental Chevy Malibu and an allowance for gas for an indefinite amount of time. That's impressive customer service to me.

Other than the freakout that spurred me to start this thread, I'm also super impressed by the members of this forum. The Bolt is a humble car, and by and large it's loved by the people here. I remain optimistic that this battery issue will be resolved well... as this is really important to GM.
 

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I saw no value in parsing the notice, so set Hilltop, ran it down a couple bars (preconditioning and driving) and parking outside until there is a REAL fix. Belt and suspenders , but I don’t have to lie awake a few feet up and over from the garage that may or may not be about to explode into a chemical fire. Life is short, why make it shorter cause some doofus had a bad day in South Korea 3 years ago and screwed up a weld.
 

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...I'm stuck with a defective, crippled, at least temporarily worthless car...
The value of the car to you, I assume, is that it provides you with transportation. It's still doing that. If you're one of the few people who's daily use case requires full battery capacity, then you're very justified to be really p*ssed off. For the rest of us, we just need a little patience.
 

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After chatting directly with the Chevrolet EV Concierge line, I'm feeling a whole lot more optimistic that they are going to do their best here and they seem to be planning to do the right thing - anywhere from a buyback to a new battery pack. We've told them we'd opt for the latter, assuming the new pack meets or exceeds the specs of the original system.
Yeah, no... The concierge I spoke with yesterday was overly optimistic. Had conversations today in call-backs from Chevy that put things closer to the original, vague, hand-wavy "promises" made in the recall notice. No specific assertions as to what they will do to remedy, when they'll do it, or whether the remedy is certain to return the car's performance to original specs vs. the current 10% reduction in capability. Feeling way less good about things today than yesterday. We'll see what they do when they finally do it.
 

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I don't know why taking more time to arrive at a remedy makes people more anxious. A remedy needs to be vetted, and you don't want the cure to be worse than the disease. My company has to make improvements all the time, and they take a while to validate because systems are complex and need to be tested. Fixes have to pass the regulatory agencies. Procedures have to be written for the techs to implement the fixes. Those procedures have to be evaluated to make sure they are understandable and don't lead to further mistakes being made by the thousands of people who have to perform the work.

Had GM said nothing, all the paranoid people would be sleeping soundly none the wiser, and GM could have risked everyone in the meantime until they had worked out the remedy. Probably nobody would have died had they done that, because nobody has died in the previous 3 years, but they took the extra cautious and ethical road to inform people of the problem. Taking action is appropriate, hand-wringing is just extra abuse we place on ourselves.
 

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The value of the car to you, I assume, is that it provides you with transportation. It's still doing that. If you're one of the few people who's daily use case requires full battery capacity, then you're very justified to be really p*ssed off. For the rest of us, we just need a little patience.
Don’t forget the other few of us whose cars are no longer with us. Chevy still hasn’t told me what the remedy is for me.
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