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Hi everyone!

Getting a Bolt in the next few weeks and was wondering how much it costs to install a level 2 charger in my home. I live on Long Island, NY so electric is a bit more expensive than the rest of the country, and my breaker box is on the opposite side of the house. Just wondering about how much I should expect to pay. Thanks in advance!
 

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It varies depending on the situation. Someone who already has an unused 240V outlet outside and a 30 mile a day regular commute can use the OEM EVSE that comes with the vehicle and a $30 adapter. OTOH someone who has a full electrical box that's on the far side of the house from the driveway and travels 150 miles a daily may end up spending over $1000 for a rewire of the electrical box, running the 240V line and installing a new 40 amp EVSE.

So, tell us more about your situation, and we may be able to give you a better idea how to proceed. I always caution new EV owners about jumping into the deep end when it comes to charging at home. Depending on the circumstance, simply plugging the OEM EVSE that comes with the Bolt into a regular household outlet may be sufficient. I think folks sometime get scared off by the "The Chevy Bolt using L1 takes 60 hours to charge from empty to full." thinking that daily usage will take 60 hours to recharge.

ga2500ev
 

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Now that I think about it our dryer is right off of our garage. Am I able to just unplug the dryer and plug in the bolt to charge of course I would shut the breaker off before I did this lol. In my situation I drive probably 60 to 70 mi a day and if I get one installed it would have to be wired around my house approximately 120 ft. But I do have a 110 volt outlet on the outside of my garage that I guess I could use, I hear I get 40 to 50 miles on an overnight charge on 110 volt. We also get a $500 rebate through our electric company if we install a level 2 charger. Wondering if it might be worth it.
It varies depending on the situation. Someone who already has an unused 240V outlet outside and a 30 mile a day regular commute can use the OEM EVSE that comes with the vehicle and a $30 adapter. OTOH someone who has a full electrical box that's on the far side of the house from the driveway and travels 150 miles a daily may end up spending over $1000 for a rewire of the electrical box, running the 240V line and installing a new 40 amp EVSE.

So, tell us more about your situation, and we may be able to give you a better idea how to proceed. I always caution new EV owners about jumping into the deep end when it comes to charging at home. Depending on the circumstance, simply plugging the OEM EVSE that comes with the Bolt into a regular household outlet may be sufficient. I think folks sometime get scared off by the "The Chevy Bolt using L1 takes 60 hours to charge from empty to full." thinking that daily usage will take 60 hours to recharge.

ga2500ev
 

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Am I able to just unplug the dryer and plug
Dryer plugs (and similar) are not really built to unplug and replug lots of times. There is a device called a "dryer buddy" that addresses that problem, but they are pricey at over $200. I had a 240V 50 amp installed at $420
 

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Now that I think about it our dryer is right off of our garage. Am I able to just unplug the dryer and plug in the bolt to charge of course I would shut the breaker off before I did this lol. In my situation I drive probably 60 to 70 mi a day and if I get one installed it would have to be wired around my house approximately 120 ft. But I do have a 110 volt outlet on the outside of my garage that I guess I could use, I hear I get 40 to 50 miles on an overnight charge on 110 volt. We also get a $500 rebate through our electric company if we install a level 2 charger. Wondering if it might be worth it.
Yes you can just unplug the dryer and plug in an EVSE to charge. With the OEM EVSE that comes with the Bolt, an adapter, and your dryer plug you can recover upwards of 80 miles of recharge per day.

BTW you don't need to turn off the circuit to swap the dryer and the EVSE. While it's a big plug, it's still just an electrical plug. A more convenient option if you plan to do this regularly is a device called the "Dryer Buddy". The top level unit is a auto switching set of receptacles that will automatically direct power to the dryer when it's in use and to the EVSE when it's not. Saves the trouble of having to switch plugs.

If the 120 volt outlet outside the garage is a single with nothing else on the circuit, then it may be easy to swap it out with a 240V circuit at 20A by changing the breaker and the receptacle using the existing wiring. With a 16 amp EVSE, it would be easy to get 120 miles of recharge per night. And this setup may qualify for the $500 rebate too.

None of this is to say that going to traditional route wiring a new 240V 50A circuit and installing a full speed 32-40 amp EVSE isn't the way to go. It's just that novices often do not understand that there are other options available. So, I tend to present them as alternatives.

ga2500ev
 

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FWIW, our utility company supplied the ESVE and we paid $165 for installation.

If there is an empty space in the box for adding a breaker, running the wiring to a plug or box for an ESVE is maybe the simplest wiring job ever. I was expecting heavy-duty 4-wire costing dollars per foot and because our garage is open inside, maybe conduit. The utility company installer showed up with a spool of flat 3-wire which cost pennies per foot. He ran the wire 40' up and over the central steel Z-beam and attached it with zip ties. A city inspector verified it was all to code. The entire install was done in less than an hour. Who knew?

jack vines
 

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I am planning on buying a BOLT in the very near future. I got three quotes for installation of a 240v/40A line in our garage. Our fuse box is in the basement. The quotes were all for running the conduit and wire , installing a 40 A breaker , and installing the 14-50 outlet in the garage. The quotes were 750$ , 1000$ , 1500$ from three different companies. This is in the Atlanta GA area.
 

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FWIW, our utility company supplied the ESVE and we paid $165 for installation.
Sweet deal. Which state/company supplies free EVSEs?!?!

Also, if you have general electrical know-how and feel comfortable, you can do it yourself for $50-$100. To cover my bases and make sure I didn't run afoul of my homeowners insurance I then paid to have it inspected and permitted (IIRC $75).
 

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Sweet deal. Which state/company supplies free EVSEs?!?!
In AZ, Tuscon Electric Power:
TEP provides a rebate to residential customers that covers up to 75% of the cost of EVSE installation. The maximum rebate awards are $500 for a two-way charger and $250 for a one-way charger.

In Phoenix:
SRP offers a rebate of $1,500 per port for commercial, workplace, and multifamily customers who install networked Level 2 EVSE. EVSE must be installed between May 1, 2020, and April 30, 2021. Funds will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.

You can search here for incentives for your location: Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives
 

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The only way to really know what it is going to cost is to get an estimate. But the dryer buddy looks like it will be the lowest cost solution.
Also check for state, local and power company rebate programs. But be careful that what you do will meet the rebate program requirements.
 

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"We also get a $500 rebate through our electric company if we install a level 2 charger. Wondering if it might be worth it."
You also might be eligible for a Federal tax credit for installing a L2 charger at home. I believe it's 50% of the installation cost (charger receipt + electrician invoice), up to $1000 - google it...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yes you can just unplug the dryer and plug in an EVSE to charge. With the OEM EVSE that comes with the Bolt, an adapter, and your dryer plug you can recover upwards of 80 miles of recharge per day.

BTW you don't need to turn off the circuit to swap the dryer and the EVSE. While it's a big plug, it's still just an electrical plug. A more convenient option if you plan to do this regularly is a device called the "Dryer Buddy". The top level unit is a auto switching set of receptacles that will automatically direct power to the dryer when it's in use and to the EVSE when it's not. Saves the trouble of having to switch plugs.

If the 120 volt outlet outside the garage is a single with nothing else on the circuit, then it may be easy to swap it out with a 240V circuit at 20A by changing the breaker and the receptacle using the existing wiring. With a 16 amp EVSE, it would be easy to get 120 miles of recharge per night. And this setup may qualify for the $500 rebate too.

None of this is to say that going to traditional route wiring a new 240V 50A circuit and installing a full speed 32-40 amp EVSE isn't the way to go. It's just that novices often do not understand that there are other options available. So, I tend to present them as alternatives.

ga2500ev
Thank you for the reply. So if I plug the bolt into my dryer outlet at 240 volts I would only get about 80 MI if I charged it overnight? Wouldn't I get about the same if I just plugged it into 110v 12 A wall outlet over 12 hours?
 

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It depends on what you mean by "overnight".

Depending on where you live (i.e. how cold it is), it is probably prudent to assume you will drive about 3 miles per kWH. The Bolt battery is about 60 kWH capacity. So 3 * 60 = 180 miles range on a full battery. If 3 miles/kWH is too conservative, then you will be pleasantly surprised with more range than you expected.

If you charge at 12A on a 120V outlet, you will get around 12A * 120V = 1.4 kWH for each hour of charging, = 1.4 kWH * 3 miles/kWH = 4.2 miles of driving for each hour of charging.

If you charge at 12A on a 240V outlet, you will get around 12A * 240V = 2.8 kWH for each hour of charging, = 2.8 * 3 = 8.4 miles of driving for each hour of charging.

Bottom line is that a 240V outlet will give you twice the "charge" as a 120V outlet for the same # of amps.
 

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Thank you for the reply. So if I plug the bolt into my dryer outlet at 240 volts I would only get about 80 MI if I charged it overnight? Wouldn't I get about the same if I just plugged it into 110v 12 A wall outlet over 12 hours?
Not likely. I use an average of 4 miles per hour of recharging on L1. So, 12 hours on L1 would be 48 miles while using the 12A OEM EVSE on a 240V circuit would double the charge, giving 96 miles.

The 80 miles was an estimate of 8 miles/hour of charge for 10 hours.

In other words, exactly what @2019EVLT said above...

ga2500ev
 
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