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Discussion Starter #21
Thanks everyone! Darn I was hoping if I plugged into a 240v outlet I would recharge at the speed of a level 2 charger, so what you are saying is the limiting factor is the factory EVSE limits me to 12 amp of charge. Can I get another charger plug that ups the amps higher than 12 amps? I think my dryer outlet is 30 amp. Thanks again!

Not likely. I use an average of 4 miles per hour of recharging on L1. So, 12 hours on L1 would be 48 miles while using the 12A OEM EVSE on a 240V circuit would double the charge, giving 96 miles.

The 80 miles was an estimate of 8 miles/hour of charge for 10 hours.

In other words, exactly what @2019EVLT said above...

ga2500ev
 

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Can I get another charger plug that ups the amps higher than 12 amps?
Yeah, the charge cord that comes with the car can only do 12 amps. I'm using mine on 240V. I can usually charge my car overnight because I don't run it completely down and don't fill it completely up. Takes about 12 hours to charge eleven bars on my 2017. Your 30 amp dryer outlet can be used up to 24 amps using the 80% rule for a continuous load. You could buy another charge cord (EVSE) that will do 24 amps or get one that has an adjustable amperage setting to allow it be set at 24 amps.
 

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The utility company installer showed up with a spool of flat 3-wire which cost pennies per foot. He ran the wire 40' up and over the central steel Z-beam and attached it with zip ties. A city inspector verified it was all to code. The entire install was done in less than an hour. Who knew?

jack vines
Would not have passed inspection in my neck of the woods. Garage and breaker box in same building, all indoors. Conduit was required - went with MC vice PVC because of the number of bends needed with rigid conduit would have been in excess of code.
 

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Should you decide to go to the expense of running a dedicated circuit, run at least a 50A circuit, and run all four wires (HOT, HOT, NEUTRAL and GROUND).

Trust me.
 

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Should you decide to go to the expense of running a dedicated circuit, run at least a 50A circuit, and run all four wires (HOT, HOT, NEUTRAL and GROUND).

Trust me.
Agree, whenever this comes up I suggest getting a quote to:
  • 50A breaker
  • 6 Awg wire
  • Nema 14-50 outlet
Having an outlet allows the most flexibility, moving, servicing the EVSE, etc...

If the breaker box is full an electrician may be able to use double breakers to free up space to allow the addition of an additional 50A 240 V breaker, depending on the main service and the other loads.
 

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Should you decide to go to the expense of running a dedicated circuit, run at least a 50A circuit, and run all four wires (HOT, HOT, NEUTRAL and GROUND). Trust me.
I would have said the same thing before I asked specifically this question of the pro installer and the city inspector. When I asked why new appliances all have four-wire and I was only getting three, they both told me a dedicated 230V-only circuit did not need nor did the code require the fourth wire. They said that's only required on appliances which also have a 115-volt leg tapping off the 230-volt supply.

Your opinions and result may vary but that's what I was told and that's what's working fine for my EVSE.

jack vines
 

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Agree, whenever this comes up I suggest getting a quote to:
  • 50A breaker
  • 6 Awg wire
  • Nema 14-50 outlet
Having an outlet allows the most flexibility, moving, servicing the EVSE, etc...
Exactly what I did, and it was a good idea given that I've already had to replace the EVSE.

If the breaker box is full an electrician may be able to use double breakers to free up space to allow the addition of an additional 50A 240 V breaker, depending on the main service and the other loads.
My panel was full, partly due to a solar panel connection using up a double slot. I replaced a pair of 15A breakers with a 15+50+15 double-slot triple breaker (assuming that's OK for code since the local Home Depot sells them).

Installing such an outlet may be very expensive in older homes that have only 100A service, where the whole panel and meter must be replaced to upgrade to 200A service. Fortunately, my panel had already been upgraded when the solar panels were installed.

All of this said, in retrospect I would have been just fine connecting the OEM charger to 240V/12A. In fact, I made and tested a 14-50R to 5-15P adapter in case the EVSE dies.
 

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I would have said the same thing before I asked specifically this question of the pro installer and the city inspector. When I asked why new appliances all have four-wire and I was only getting three, they both told me a dedicated 230V-only circuit did not need nor did the code require the fourth wire. They said that's only required on appliances which also have a 115-volt leg tapping off the 230-volt supply.

Your opinions and result may vary but that's what I was told and that's what's working fine for my EVSE.

jack vines
The issue with this circuit really isn't the EVSE. The issue is the receptacle. Most of the NEC is designed to prevent houses from burning down and connected equipment failing because someone does something that's not code and someone else who is unaware does a normal practice based on circuits being up to code.

The specific issue here is a 3 wire circuit with a 14-50 receptacle with the neutral disconnected. An EVSE, which operates strictly at 240V will work just fine. But if the next homeowner plugs in a dryer, or an RV both of which is expecting a valid neutral, that's where the trouble starts.

There are three simple solutions. First is to run the neutral wire even though it is unused for the EVSE. Second, which is a bit more complicated, is to keep the 14-50 in place with 3 wires and no neutral until you move. At that point replace the receptacle with a 6-50, which brings the house to code. Third is to wire the circuit with a 6-50 from the beginning and to plug in the EVSE with a 6-50 to 14-50 adapter.

The point is that even though the current owner of the house knows what's going on, that the house should be left as code compliant once the EV owner vacates the premises. IMHO all 14-50's on a wall of a house should have 4 wires connected to it since it's a receptacle that is expected to have a neutral.

ga2500ev
 

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In 2017, I leased a Fiat 500e and needed to charge it almost daily because of the limited range. I had an electrician install a new, dedicated 240V circuit and plug right at the junction box. It cost $450 all in. I also bought one of those nice Clipper Creek charge converters, which was about $400. When I moved to Washington, I broke the lease on the Fiat because it was cheaper than trucking it up here, and kept the charge converter, knowing I would need it again someday.

The house I bought had an electric stove and I had a gas line routed to the kitchen and got a gas stove. This meant I had a now-unused dedicated 240V circuit and plug, so I had the electrician flop it onto the other side of the wall so it was in the garage. Maybe $50 in labor out of the whole job. Two years later, I leased my Bolt. Got the charge converter out of the box where it had been sitting, mounted it on the wall, plugged it in, hooked it up to the Bolt, and it made that satisfying clink-clunk sound it does when establishing contact. Green charge lights flashing, all good.

So, the first one was a bit expensive, but the second one was MUCH cheaper!
 

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In 2017, I leased a Fiat 500e and needed to charge it almost daily because of the limited range. I had an electrician install a new, dedicated 240V circuit and plug right at the junction box. It cost $450 all in. I also bought one of those nice Clipper Creek charge converters, which was about $400. When I moved to Washington, I broke the lease on the Fiat because it was cheaper than trucking it up here, and kept the charge converter, knowing I would need it again someday.

The house I bought had an electric stove and I had a gas line routed to the kitchen and got a gas stove. This meant I had a now-unused dedicated 240V circuit and plug, so I had the electrician flop it onto the other side of the wall so it was in the garage. Maybe $50 in labor out of the whole job. Two years later, I leased my Bolt. Got the charge converter out of the box where it had been sitting, mounted it on the wall, plugged it in, hooked it up to the Bolt, and it made that satisfying clink-clunk sound it does when establishing contact. Green charge lights flashing, all good.

So, the first one was a bit expensive, but the second one was MUCH cheaper!
Living the dream. :)

Still trickle-charging here and daydreaming about level two one day. Must be nice.
 
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