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Discussion Starter #1
For planning a trip, it sure would be helpful to know which DCFC stations are, say, 100amp vs 125amp.

Does anyone know how to find this information? Even partial information from a few charging networks would be very helpful.
 

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Avoid the Chevrolet dealership 25kW chargers

Most of the EVgo and ChargePoint chargers are plenty adequate at about 50 kW. The only really bad underpowered chargers I found were the 25kW DC fast chargers located at Chevrolet dealerships. Still don't understand why Chevrolet does this. There may be some other old chargers around that don't provide 50 kW, but I have never found them.
 

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Most of the EVgo and ChargePoint chargers are plenty adequate at about 50 kW. The only really bad underpowered chargers I found were the 25kW DC fast chargers located at Chevrolet dealerships. Still don't understand why Chevrolet does this. There may be some other old chargers around that don't provide 50 kW, but I have never found them.
Most (if not all) of the Chevy dealerships that I have encountered put their "Level 2" EVSE in for the VOLT, with incentives from Chevrolet & the EVSE manufacturer. This was a requirement of "Volt certification". These were 16 amp EVSE running on 206 volts for 3.3 kW. This was adequate for the Volt both because of its limited amp capability and its smaller battery (18.4 kWh) which meant they could advertise "fully charged in 5.5 hours" which did not mean much! This power level fills the Bolt battery (60 kWh) in 18.2 hours which is not even overnight destination charging! Still, they indicate "free Level 2 charging" on PlugShare. GM has provided NO incentive to upgrade to Bolt-desirable standards, which is one reason why many dealerships will not carry (sell/service) the Bolt.

Just as the DCFC plugs should disclose their power (either by initial amperage OR wattage), so should the Level 2 EVSE disclose whether they are 32 amps or 16 amps! Every time I use a commercial EVSE I post the kW capability in the comments. We should all do the same. Even if you do not need a charge (but are not >50% SoC) , but you can visit that plug, observe & post its capability. Maybe soon PlugShare will give us a field for that data, which will show up-front, and not make us chase the comments. {AND, maybe even filter by that data!}
 

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Most (if not all) of the Chevy dealerships that I have encountered put their "Level 2" EVSE in for the VOLT, with incentives from Chevrolet & the EVSE manufacturer. This was a requirement of "Volt certification". These were 16 amp EVSE running on 206 volts for 3.3 kW.
When I ordered the Bolt they changed a free tank of gas for a full charge. When I went to pick up the Bolt they had it plugged in. They wanted to wait for it to fully charge. They had no clue. I went over to the "level 2" EVSE they had it plugged in to and the nameplate had 16 amps. I was like no, just give me the Bolt and forget about charging it. It would have meant coming in the next day to get my fully charged Bolt.
 

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25kW chargers are not useful for long-distance driving

Most (if not all) of the Chevy dealerships that I have encountered put their "Level 2" EVSE in for the VOLT,
The Chevy dealerships I mentioned above had level 3 chargers at 25 kW. They are slow "fast chargers". Level 2 is another matter. The question I believe was to do with fast chargers. I found that such 25 kW chargers took twice as long to charge as an EVgo 50 kW charger. This is totally unacceptable while traveling upwards of 450 miles in a day.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Another reason I brought this up is because I have kept track of my 9 DCFC sessions on 5 different chargers. I've actually noticed three different charging rates:

Slower:

  • ChargePoint at BMW Zentrum (BMW factory in Greer, SC)
Gave me about 0.34 kWh per minute

Medium:

  • Evgo in Charlotte, NC
  • Evgo in Anderson, SC
Both gave be about 0.55 kWh per minute

Faster:

  • ChargePoint/Georgia Power in Thomson, GA
  • Greenlots at Kia Dealer in Perry, GA
Both gave me about 0.70 kWh per minute
 

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Charging rate, and 50 kW chargers

Another reason I brought this up is because I have kept track of my 9 DCFC sessions on 5 different chargers. I've actually noticed three different charging rates:
I took a look at my numbers, and I have exactly the same as you for EVgo, but my Greenlots charging in Grove City (OH), was also about the same as EVgo (0.55). Your BMW number looks like a ~ 25 kW charger similar to the Chevrolet Chargers. I think the most interesting is the 0.7 kWh number. Assuming 3.7 m/kWh, that could bring you to about 78 miles per 30 minutes, which is much higher than I have ever seen. Those chargers might be higher power than the normal 50 kW chargers. I have heard there are one or two chargers around that are above 50 kW. Looks like you snagged them! Alternatively, you might have charged from a very low range left, which might have made a difference to the average charging time.

I know when I have gone on long trips, I am often so intent on the journey that trying to record all the data is a bit chancy. I usually recorded range left, but even that is a bit variable as just switching the a/c on and off changes the range left before and after charging.

I have data for about 20 DC fast chargers, of which only a couple, the chevys, differ from 0.55 KWh.
 

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For planning a trip, it sure would be helpful to know which DCFC stations are, say, 100amp vs 125amp.

Does anyone know how to find this information? Even partial information from a few charging networks would be very helpful.
I've been making a habit of checking the electrical plates on the DC Fast Chargers I encounter and then updating the description of the charger on PlugShare to include the information. I recommend everyone do this.
 

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The Chevy dealerships I mentioned above had level 3 chargers at 25 kW. They are slow "fast chargers". Level 2 is another matter. The question I believe was to do with fast chargers. I found that such 25 kW chargers took twice as long to charge as an EVgo 50 kW charger. This is totally unacceptable while traveling upwards of 450 miles in a day.
You are so right. I was not comparing to your Level 3 data, but simply adding my "Level 2" experience at Chevy Dealerships (3 of them).

I'm still learning a lot about DCFC. How do they achieve that 25 kW (or 50 kW)? {This is an initial wattage, right, not an "average"?} Volts x Amps = Watts. It was my understanding that all (non-Tesla) DCFC were either 350 or 400 DC volts. Is there a range of voltages that qualify as Level 3? Are some above 400 V? How low can they be and still qualify as Level 3? Do you multiply 350 volts x 71.43 amps to get 25000 Watts (25 kW)? Or do you multiply 250 V x 100 A to get 25 kW? Is 50 kW gained from 400 V x 125 A?

I know that the amperage (and therefore wattage) drops during charging. I once DCFCed in Lexington, VA where I started at 21.0% SoC (EVSE data, not my EV; I thought I was closer to 10%). The voltage started at 348.5 V & the "current" was 100.9 A. At 96% SoC, the voltage was up to 400.6 V and the "current" down to 25.3 A. The amperage dropped to <5 A when it shut off 15 minutes later. It had "dispensed" 53.9 kWh. Did I start at 35 kW?
 

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I'm still learning a lot about DCFC. How do they achieve that 25 kW (or 50 kW)? {This is an initial wattage, right, not an "average"?} Volts x Amps = Watts.
With a DCFC the car's battery charging system requests a certain voltage from the charger in order to control the amount of power going into the battery. A higher voltage will result in more current, which in turn means more power. The car's charging system changes the requested voltage as the battery fills according to the charging profile designed by the designers, who have to balance fast charging speeds against battery degradation.

It was my understanding that all (non-Tesla) DCFC were either 350 or 400 DC volts. Is there a range of voltages that qualify as Level 3? Are some above 400 V?
I can't speak for Tesla chargers, but all of the CCS DC fast chargers that I've come across so far are rated at 500V. That doesn't mean they charge at 500 volts, it means that's the maximum they can produce. As noted above, the actual voltage varies according to what the car requests.

How low can they be and still qualify as Level 3?
I have no idea what the CCS standard says about this, but if the charger isn't capable of producing at least 350 to 400 volts then it's not going to be able to charge most cars.

Do you multiply 350 volts x 71.43 amps to get 25000 Watts (25 kW)? Or do you multiply 250 V x 100 A to get 25 kW? Is 50 kW gained from 400 V x 125 A?
Yes, yes, and yes.

... The voltage started at 348.5 V & the "current" was 100.9 A. At 96% SoC, the voltage was up to 400.6 V and the "current" down to 25.3 A. The amperage dropped to <5 A when it shut off 15 minutes later. It had "dispensed" 53.9 kWh. Did I start at 35 kW?
Yes. As the battery fills, the current will decrease unless you increase the voltage. Think of it like two tanks connected by a hose that runs from one bottom of one tank to the bottom of the other - the charger is one tank and the battery is the other. The voltage is the height of the water in the tank. If you start with a full charger tank and empty battery tank, the water will rush through the connecting hose pretty quickly - in this analogy the speed of the water is equivalent to the current (amps). As the water flows, the levels (voltages) in the charger and battery get closer to each other and the flow of water slows down. In order to maintain the same flow, you have to add more water to the charger tank so that it's level (voltage) is higher compared to the battery's level.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've been making a habit of checking the electrical plates on the DC Fast Chargers I encounter and then updating the description of the charger on PlugShare to include the information. I recommend everyone do this.
Good advice. I think a lot of people don't know that you can update the PlugShare description instead of just leaving a comment.

Can you give more detail on "checking the electrical plates"? Can I determine the kW of the device by simply looking at it?
 

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100A "50 kW" CCS/CHAdeMO stations are a farce. There is no EV in existence that can actually observe 50 kW charge rates on such a station. Even a Tesla can't reach 50 kW from a 100A station. The fact they can get away with advertising as 50 kW is a bit of a joke.
 

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I haven’t yet charged anywhere other than at home on L2. However, in addition to the Chargepoint, Plugshare etc. maps, I believe each Chevrolet dealer who’s authorized to sell Bolt EV is required by GM to install at least one DCFC (CCS plug style).

Recently when I took my wife’s ICE car to the local Chev dealer the service person told me they had one DCFC and two L2’s where I could charge my Bolt. Even though I didn’t buy my Bolt from them. I was told they’re free most of the time. I didn’t ask if those EVSE’s were available only during business hours. In my case there’s two Chev Bolt EV dealers that are actually closer to me than the Chargepoints.

Next time I’ll ask if the Canada Chev Bolt EV dealer CCS plugged EVSE’s are only 25kW as rgmichel has pointed out.
 

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100A "50 kW" CCS/CHAdeMO stations are a farce. There is no EV in existence that can actually observe 50 kW charge rates on such a station. Even a Tesla can't reach 50 kW from a 100A station. The fact they can get away with advertising as 50 kW is a bit of a joke.
Bro, can you share where you find out that some EVgo stations are 100A limited?
 

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Bro, can you share where you find out that some EVgo stations are 100A limited?
There really is no easy way. One way I do know is the check the model name of the EVgo station. A "BTC" station is likely 100A limited, while a "Terra 53" is probably a 125A max station. However, that's not a guarantee.
 

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This whole discussion seems unreal to me. It is like talking about your "favorite" unicorn. Unless you stick to interstate highways, near large metro areas, finding any DC fast charger along your desired route would be near miraculous.
 

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I took a look at my numbers, and I have exactly the same as you for EVgo, but my Greenlots charging in Grove City (OH), was also about the same as EVgo (0.55).
Since you around the area, what does that equate to on the dash. I get 43 or so at from the free Easton super chargers in Columbus, OH.
 
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