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At the 2 year maintenance on my 2017 Bolt, I asked the service dept. to update all software. They refused my request, unless I could describe a problem requiring a software update. Chevy has a long way to go to match the Tesla OTA software updates. BTW - I traded the 2017 for a 2020 Bolt; new software the hard way.
The stealership strategy worked! Sounds like a win-win. Congrats! :)
 

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At the 2 year maintenance on my 2017 Bolt, I asked the service dept. to update all software. They refused my request, unless I could describe a problem requiring a software update. Chevy has a long way to go to match the Tesla OTA software updates. BTW - I traded the 2017 for a 2020 Bolt; new software the hard way.
While upgrading a car is always nice, one could have also googled the latest firmware version, look for articles of the symptoms the firmware fixes, and then complain to the dealer that's what happens in your car.

I would LOVE to upgrade my Bolt to a 2020 model and can do it for no increase in payments per month with the offers currently at my local dealer. However, I'm 2.5 years into my 5 year purchase and I do not want to start over. I need that payment in 2.5 years for my Model Y or CyberTruck purchase as I am also keeping the Bolt.
 

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In 2.5 years, 400 miles may be the new standard. At that time, the Bolt would be considered a City Car. ;)
 

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At the 2 year maintenance on my 2017 Bolt, I asked the service dept. to update all software. They refused my request, unless I could describe a problem requiring a software update. Chevy has a long way to go to match the Tesla OTA software updates. BTW - I traded the 2017 for a 2020 Bolt; new software the hard way.
That's simply an awful excuse for not updating the software by them. Shame on that dealer. Did you ask other dealers if that was the norm or just an exception with that dealer?
 

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Do Over-The-Air OTA software updates work on the new model Bolts? Or all Bolts with updated software? If so, is via your home wifi or the OnStar system?
I think there are many answers to that question but sadly I also don't believe anyone is certain at how GM is truly handling updates. IF in fact they are doing any. More importantly is this OTA used for bug fixes, feature enhancements or both? Has it been used recently fleet wide? How does GM notify the owners and are the consistent at notifying? At what point do they stop supporting a model year? I know, they will address safety defects and issues that can save them money. I'm sure most realize by now that GM puts their interest ahead of the customers in regards to technology updates. It's been that way for the 20 years I've owned their products, I was foolishly hopeful the EV world was different.
 

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not to hijack this thread, but I use Md5 summer all the time at work. What do you mean it has been compromised?

Again, I’m happy this has worked for folks. The standard practice where software is distributed from sites other than the vendor’s site is to have the vendor post a hash value that can be computed by a known algorithm. We used to use MD5 but it’s been compromised. Many times now code is signed using public key cryptography, with the public part of the key published by the vendor in lieu of a hash value. If the update file is downloaded from GM directly then this is not as much of an issue, but I thought the files were being downloaded from sites other than GM itself. I stand corrected if the downloads are from GM...
 

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not to hijack this thread, but I use Md5 summer all the time at work. What do you mean it has been compromised?
It's been shown that an attacker can reverse-engineer the MD5 checksum and come up with a different payload that still matches the same checksum. This means that it's possible, at least in theory, for an attacker to maliciously modify a file and still have it pass the MD5 checksum test. Which means that MD5 is no longer a solid guarantee that the file hasn't been deliberately tampered with.

However, if your expectation of the MD5 checksum is simply to verify that a file hasn't suffered from any bit errors in the process of being copied from a trusted source to you, then it's still perfectly viable to use.
 
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