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Discussion Starter #1
We have two Bolts. Are really enjoying the almost total lack of maintenance required. One thing I do monthly is to check the tire pressures. The Bolt makes this easy by just going to the screen that shows the pressure for it's tires. For two years the readouts have been dead accurate when checking them against a hand gauge. Recently, however, there have been some inaccuracies by several pounds in some of the tires. Let's say my right front tire readout is 34 (indicating pressure is a bit low), but when I check with the hand gauge, the pressure is 38 (normal). Seems to me the TPMS gauges in the tires are getting flaky, and I'm wondering why. Are the little internal batteries in the tires wearing out? And if so, what to do.

If the batteries are getting low, I'm not going to replace them immediately. It occurred to me that when it's time for new tires, that would be a good opportunity to do so. But I've run across no information about this. Has anybody else been through this?
 

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Great question. I've never had a car with this feature. Although I've had a wireless sensor on my alarm system that still is going strong after 14 years. I laugh, because I have an old fish tank in my shop that had a battery powered automatic feeder. It's been there for nearly 20 years and I still hear that feeder run every so often. So how long can those TPMS sensors run?
 

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TPMS battery life will change from car to car based on use! I know of a system still working
@ 15 years now. Don't worry about the difference in pressure reading. Drive the car a while
and recheck them with your gauge. Maybe find a second gauge to verify your findings.
 

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I find that the difference in pressure readings between tires observed first thing in the morning typically evens out once I have been driving 10 minutes or so.
 

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Tires exposed to the sun will change one side to the other. If the car is parked in a garage with
no sunlight hitting them, they should all read the same cold.

I find that the difference in pressure readings between tires observed first thing in the morning typically evens out once I have been driving 10 minutes or so.
Yes as tires heat up from driving they will have pressure increases unless they are filled with 100% nitrogen.

Warmer tires will raise the pressure. This is why you always check tires at cold.
 

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While we're on tire pressure, kudos to my 10 week-old Bolt wheels for holding air! The 2017 Corvette and 2018 Camaro with runflats required air every 2 weeks or so without fail. 1 memory I don't miss.
 

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While we're on tire pressure, kudos to my 10 week-old Bolt wheels for holding air! The 2017 Corvette and 2018 Camaro with runflats required air every 2 weeks or so without fail. 1 memory I don't miss.
2-week replenishing sounds astonishingly bad. FYI, my Bolt EV needs to replenish air every 3 to 6 months. 3 if weather is getting colder, and 6 if getting warmer.
 

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While we're on tire pressure, kudos to my 10 week-old Bolt wheels for holding air! The 2017 Corvette and 2018 Camaro with runflats required air every 2 weeks or so without fail. 1 memory I don't miss.
I know I'm being picky on terminology here, but these tires are self-sealing, not run flats. The idea of a run flat is that the tire is rigid (reinforced) enough to actually run for a limited distance after losing some or even all of its air.
 

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To the OP, I have experienced the same issue. The pressure seems to be 2 or 3 pounds lower when measured with a gauge. I have verified this using 3 different tire gauges. This started just after I took the car in for it's second free service. Originally the 4 tires each had radically different errors in reading. After a few weeks it seemed to "fix the variation." Now they just show a lower than measured pressure.
But as someone else commented, they do hold their pressure well.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You know folks, I have two Bolts (for years) and I'm aware of how well they hold air and how temperature affects tire pressure (1 pound of loss for every 10 degree drop in temp. We know that the batteries in the sensors don't have an infinite life. The question is how easy it is to renew the batteries, or do we have to install new sensors when the batteries go bad. Anyone know?
 

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The question is how easy it is to renew the batteries, or do we have to install new sensors when the batteries go bad. Anyone know?
A google search seems to indicate that the whole sensor needs to be replaced. There's youtube videos showing people replacing batteries that doesn't look like any fun.
 

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I know I'm being picky on terminology here, but these tires are self-sealing, not run flats. The idea of a run flat is that the tire is rigid (reinforced) enough to actually run for a limited distance after losing some or even all of its air.
You're not being picky at all. I realize there is a difference between the types,I was just throwing it out there.
 

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A google search seems to indicate that the whole sensor needs to be replaced. There's youtube videos showing people replacing batteries that doesn't look like any fun.
While it can be done, they obviously are not intended to be user serviceable.
 

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TPMS has been fine through 45000+ miles. My OEM sensors were kept when I switched from the OEM Energy Savers to Cinturato P7 tires. I've used 2 analog gauges and 2 digital ones (electric pumps) and they all agree within 2 psi of what the Bolt tells me. Typically, the difference is the Bolt is lower than what my gauge tells me, which might be due to how fast I can disconnect the gauge or fill hose.
 

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You should get 5yrs minimum out of a factory-fresh TPMS.
I've got 2-1/2 years on the car now and it's probably going to be close to 4 or maybe even 5 years by the time I'll need new tires, so it sounds like getting new sensors at that time would be a good bet. Otherwise it seems likely that I'd have to pay for them partway through the lifetime of the replacement tires anyway, as well as having the hassle and expense of removing and reinstalling all the tires.
 

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The going rate for new sensors at America's Tire Company was $69 each, plus installation and programming. The average cost for sensor replacement is between $444 and $1921. Not something you do preemptively. Rather, they fail randomly requiring extra visits.

Replacing the ones on my truck cost $450, and they couldn't be made to work, so I'd have to take the truck to the dealer. Not. My friend's truck cost him $1100 for the job. And then the accuracy still comes into question.

I don't think people realize what a boondoggle these sensors are. It's better to ignore the light and manage the pressure yourself 3 or 4 times per year. Yet they become a huge, unnecessary liability at time of inspection or sale.
 
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