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Discussion Starter #1
ok - even though Tesla can't make any model 3's - facts are emerging as to the L2 charging capabilities of the car - it's a bit confusing - but I hope this will clear it up.

first off Tesla is shipping a new portable EVSE with the Model 3 called Universal Mobile Charger-II (UMC) called UMC II - UMC II has a new style for NEMA plug-adapters - and a maximum charge rate of 32 amps...

so soon we will have 3 Tesla UMC's to choose from if we want to go that route for a portable EVSE
the original UMC-I - 40 amp max charge rate with modular NEMA adapters ($550)
the modified UMC-I - 40 amp max charge rate with a fixed NEMA 14-50 plug ($520)
the new UMC-II - 32 amp max charge rate with a new array of different NEMA plug-adapters ($???)

the Model 3 itself will come with two different onboard/in-car charger rates

the short-range Model 3 (215 mile version) will come with a maximum 32 amp on-board charger
the long-range Model 3 (310 mile version) will come with a maximum 48 amp on-board charger
all Model 3's can use Tesla Superchargers via per-use cost that are undisclosed at this time
it's also expected by not confirmed that the existing Chademo Adapter will also work with a Model 3 ($450 option for the Model S/X) - we will have to wait and see if this is true however.
it is not yet confirmed/denied as to if the 48 amp charger will be an option for the short range version - I'm going to guess no, it will not be an option.

pricing for UMC-II is not currently posted - so stay tuned - I'm hoping it's cheaper than the UMC-I which is currently priced at $550/$520

UMC-II currently lists the following adapters (new design vs. the UMC-I adapters)
NEMA 5-15 - 120 volts @ 12 amps charge rate
NEMA 5-20 - 120 volts @ 16 amps charge rate
NEMA 6-15 - 240 volts @ 12 amps charge rate
NEMA 6-20 - 240 volts @ 16 amps charge rate
NEMA 6-50 - 240 volts @ 40 amps charge rate (32 amp limit via the UMC-II)
NEMA 10-30 - 240 volts @ 24 amps charge rate
NEMA 14-30 - 240 volts @ 24 amps charge rate
NEMA 14-50 - 240 volts @ 40 amps charge rate (32 amp limit via the UMC-II)

adapters seem to be $35 each - and I'm guessing the UMC-II will come with NEMA 5-15, and NEMA 14-50 adapter
so you'd need to buy 6 adapters @ $35/each to have collected all the Pokemon - $210 + UMC-II cost for a full set of plug adapters.

there no confirmation yet- but also no reason to believe the existing Tesla to J-1772 jdapter stub will not work with UMC-II - it should continue to work fine, but we'll have to wait and see once these hit the open market.

this is posted in the spirit of be aware of the competition and for informational purposes only.
 

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We have only done one longish trip in the three and a half months we have had our Bolt. But my limited experience tells me that 240 volt charging is pointless, other than emergencies, except for an overnight stay. If you have to use 240 volt charging during the day, it's going to be a really short day. With perfect spacing of DCFC stations...about 120 miles apart...you could run 80 mph from one to the next, with a safe margin, and do 550 miles from sunup to sundown. Without fast chargers, your best bet would be to stick to secondary roads, and slow down to get as far on a full charge as possible, and call it a day.
 

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I wonder if UMC-II will also feature current limiting for owners can't afford an 40A circuit yet after dropping a large sum on their new M3. If they offer current limiting, chances are the UMC-II might be the same price as older UMC chargers.

If there's no current limiting, I'm guessing the UMC-II will come in at $450 (complete swag).

EDIT: Dang it, I'm not well read. Just learned from above post that UMC supports current limiting based on adapter connected. >_< My new guess is a price of $500 even.
 

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But my limited experience tells me that 240 volt charging is pointless, other than emergencies, except for an overnight stay.
Yeah, that's my takeaway too. You use DCFCs for extending your range during the day, and you choose Level 2 chargers with 32A capability based on their proximity to wherever you plan to spend the night. Since there are more of the latter, that gives you more flexibility with your overnight stays.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, that's my takeaway too. You use DCFCs for extending your range during the day, and you choose Level 2 chargers with 32A capability based on their proximity to wherever you plan to spend the night. Since there are more of the latter, that gives you more flexibility with your overnight stays.
when destination charging (overnight) while you might be fine waiting all night for your car to charge - it might be nice if others could use the charger when your car is done. Faster charging is to everyone's benefit when it's a shared resource - freeing the charging space for the next polite EV owner that has waited for your car to finish…
 

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when destination charging (overnight) while you might be fine waiting all night for your car to charge - it might be nice if others could use the charger when your car is done. Faster charging is to everyone's benefit when it's a shared resource - freeing the charging space for the next polite EV owner that has waited for your car to finish…
This is why we need to use: 1) Some sort of messaging (card, printed sheet, frisbee) to say: a) here’s how to know I’m fully charged, & b) OK to unplug me when done; and, 2) the myChevrolet app to text you when your Bolt is finished charging, so, no matter the time, you can move the EV and free up the space.
 

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I would not consider leaving my car parked at a slow charger, away from the place I was spending the night. The opportunities for vandalism are way too high. The one time we have used a slow charger was at our hotel for two hours, to top up the charge, after fast charging to 80%. After two hours, I went down and moved the car to a regular space. A hotel far from the street, a B&B, or an RV park, are the only places I would feel comfortable leaving it plugged in all night.
 

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when destination charging (overnight) while you might be fine waiting all night for your car to charge - it might be nice if others could use the charger when your car is done. Faster charging is to everyone's benefit when it's a shared resource - freeing the charging space for the next polite EV owner that has waited for your car to finish…
Sure, but if there aren't any DC Fast Chargers in town and you need a full charge for tomorrow's leg of your trip, what else are you gonna do? It seems to me that an L2 charger at a hotel is pretty much intended for overnight charging.
 

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I would not consider leaving my car parked at a slow charger, away from the place I was spending the night. The opportunities for vandalism are way too high. The one time we have used a slow charger was at our hotel for two hours, to top up the charge, after fast charging to 80%. After two hours, I went down and moved the car to a regular space. A hotel far from the street, a B&B, or an RV park, are the only places I would feel comfortable leaving it plugged in all night.
I agree with "not consider ... away from the place". I have done three overnight Level 2 charges away from home. The first was on the way home from EV purchase 350 miles from home in a Chevy dealer's lot with a cheap motel within walking distance (1/4 mile). It was free. I was plugged in for 13 hours. The second was was in a hotel (where I was staying, near Rockville, MD) garage with key-card entrance. It was free. They had four spaces painted with each of two EVSE reaching two spaces. One was broken. My app texted me when charging was completed (8 hours) and I went down & moved the car to a non-EV space. The last was in Columbus OH one block from my hotel in the parking lot behind The Electrical Trades Center (found on PlugShare). It was free. The lady at the ETC with whom I spoke prior to the trip was very nice & helpful. (They had 6 different brands/models of EVSE, and solar panels to (partially) supply them. I presume their students open them up to learn how they are each wired similarly and differently. VERY cool!) Mine was the only EV charging. I left the Bolt around 10 pm, felt safe walking to the hotel, and moved the EV to my hotel's parking lot at 8 am.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
several hotels I've stayed at have more EV customers than chargers - they appreciate a faster charging session so that they can accommodate all of their EV customers with an overnight charge - they often provide valet's that will swap the cars while you sleep - faster charging rates mean they can charge more EV's to full in a given amount of time…
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If I could afford a hotel with valets to move cars around in the middle of the night, I would fly to my destination, and not torture myself driving a car. :)
I've found some mid-range hotels in CA that offer EV charging have staff that can move cars for charging purposes - not strictly valet's - but it's not limited to high end hotels.
 

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I don't see that happening in Virginia in this decade. Northern Virginia may be an exception.

As a kid in the 1950s midwest, my blue collar parents got decent living wages, and paid vacations. I got a great education every summer. We would car camp with a Rambler station wagon. My mom made curtains for it, and planned the routes, sending postcards off to chambers of commerce, and government departments for info. My dad made screens for the windows, and a roll out kitchen that slide out onto the tailgate on rollers. We had every piece of equipment Coleman made, I think. I saw most of the US, and much of Canada, back when there actually were regional differences. Back then local, state, and federal campgrounds were not traffic jams, as they are now.

Anyway, if I was a widow, I'd pull out the back seat, and build an elevated sleeping platform on the passenger side. I could store all my stuff under it, and put my bicycle on the left side. RV campgrounds have 14-50 hookups, showers, toilets, camp stores...everything I need...for under fifty bucks a night. And the security is great. Most of the campers are armed to the teeth. :) I figure it would show off the virtues of EVs to the people who need to see it the most.
 

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This is off topic for this thread but the short answer is no because they are not yet available in the US.
Oh, but they do exist! As of last month, there are 8 of them lined up in the fancy new mall/condo development in Charlottesville, and about every 120 miles along all the interstates. At some point, Elon is going to need the cash flow those units could provide. I can't wait.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Tesla forums have a photo of a Volvo Test mule at a Tesla Supercharger in Europe...

Apparently the driver refused to answer any questions.
 

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Oh, but they do exist! As of last month, there are 8 of them lined up in the fancy new mall/condo development in Charlottesville, and about every 120 miles along all the interstates. At some point, Elon is going to need the cash flow those units could provide. I can't wait.
Ah, sounds like you're referring to Tesla Superchargers. The Bolt EV will never be compatible and able to use them.
 
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