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That was how GM approached it initially. Based on the newest bulletins, it looks as though GM has thrown in the towel on that endeavor. They have listed ALL 2020-2022 Bolts in the same recall, and flat out said that battery packs are being replaced.

The decision to not open up the batteries is a good decision, IMO.
The additional risk of having dealers replace modules [instead of the full pack] is something I'd expect GM to avoid. It's a non-trivial process, and as others have pointed out, the opportunities for f*cking it up are plentiful. Replacing the full pack is relatively simple. Maybe GM will go through all the returned packs and re-purpose the modules if they figure out a way to verify they don't have the defects. It'd make a lot of powerwalls...
 

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From NHTSA for GM Recall N212345940 (2020-22): "The remedy will be the replacement of defective battery modules in the recall population." This phrasing lines up exactly with what GM has been saying so far, which is the 2020-22 will only have defective modules replaced, not full packs.
GM has said that 2020-2022 will have defective modules replaced, but did not say that they will have only defective modules replaced. Their wording gives the wiggle room to replace only defective modules if they can determine which modules are known-good and do not need replacement, but if they cannot figure out a way to do that, they will replace all modules, and replacing all modules fulfills the promise to replace defective modules, since defective modules is a subset of all modules.

Similarly, promising to replace modules gives them wiggle room to replace just the modules, although replacing entire packs as being done at least initially fulfills that promise, since replacing entire packs includes replacing the modules.
 

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The additional risk of having dealers replace modules [instead of the full pack] is something I'd expect GM to avoid. It's a non-trivial process, and as others have pointed out, the opportunities for f*cking it up are plentiful. Replacing the full pack is relatively simple. Maybe GM will go through all the returned packs and re-purpose the modules if they figure out a way to verify they don't have the defects. It'd make a lot of powerwalls...
Without space constraints of an auto, grid storage with fireproof insulation layers between cell packs and additional cooling, these could be useful? I hope they find ways to re-use, that would be far less wasteful than tearing them apart and recycling the materials.
 

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Really you have to understand when someone started their buyback process. For instance, I did my request in July prior to the recall being expanded. My intent was to get into a 2022 that wasn't under recall... but then the recall was expanded and the process is still dragging on.

For others it's the lack of timeline and clarity from gm that's pushing them towards another EV. Some states have more EV vehicles for sale and thus there are options for people to move to a different EV, and while the buyback might not be a great deal they might qualify for the Federal $7,500 plus additional State incentives. If I could pick up $7,500 + $3,000/$5,000 State incentive I might be willing to take a "loss" on the buyback of a Bolt and get into a new EV instead.

Frankly I think it's practical as can be. Once gm said all batteries are potentially defective, why question making a move to a newer car without that risk... especially if it doesn't end up costing you money on the deal.
Fair enough, I have the perspective of driving a 2020 Bolt that has a lower probability of fire risk than the 2016 vehicle parked next to it in the garage, so to me it all seems like a bit of "the sky is falling", but as I said, to each their own, everyone has a different situation and I do respect that, given how long the buyback process can take, and that some started it before the recall was expanded, I get it...
 

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You are slightly out of date. This is not on the NHTSA site yet, but this is the mailer being sent to customers currently. This is straightforward. GM will be moving each vehicle currently part of the 940 recall into 941 when their battery back is available.
View attachment 38194
Thank you. This is the first time in black and white I've seen a firm indication that the 2020-22 will get new packs.
 

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Without space constraints of an auto, grid storage with fireproof insulation layers between cell packs and additional cooling, these could be useful? I hope they find ways to re-use, that would be far less wasteful than tearing them apart and recycling the materials.
Seems like a theoretical possibility for use as grid storage would be:
1. Rebuild them into packs with fire resistant stuff between the pouches.
2. Install the packs into containers with fire sprinklers that will fill them up with water if too much heat is detected.
3. Set the maximum charge and discharge limits to minimize the risk of causing a defective cell to catch fire.
 

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GM has said that 2020-2022 will have defective modules replaced, but did not say that they will have only defective modules replaced. Their wording gives the wiggle room to replace only defective modules if they can determine which modules are known-good and do not need replacement, but if they cannot figure out a way to do that, they will replace all modules, and replacing all modules fulfills the promise to replace defective modules, since defective modules is a subset of all modules.

Similarly, promising to replace modules gives them wiggle room to replace just the modules, although replacing entire packs as being done at least initially fulfills that promise, since replacing entire packs includes replacing the modules.
I think most posters were skeptical that GM would be able to reliably identify all defective modules with software, especially after there were fires after the previous "final remedy" software update. Therefore, GM would be forced to replace all modules, including in 2020-22 Bolts, to ensure that all defective modules would be taken out of circulation.

The latest updates from GM's description of the new software update ("might" indicate a damaged battery), and the service info sent to dealerships (tools and procedures for 2020-22 recall bulletin the same as 2017-19 recall bulletin), seem to confirm that suspicion. GM seems to be acknowledging that software cannot detect all defective modules, so GM is planning to replace all packs.

This isn't necessarily all good news. Replacing entire packs will require manufacturing entire packs, which will take longer than identifying and replacing only defective modules. So 2020-22 Bolt owners will likely have to wait longer for a battery replacement.

I think an accurate / legitimate complaint is about how this apparent decision to replace entire packs for 2020-22 Bolts will impact repair timelines, not arguing that GM is still planning to replace only some modules on 2020-22 Bolts.
 

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Fair enough, I have the perspective of driving a 2020 Bolt that has a lower probability of fire risk than the 2016 vehicle parked next to it in the garage, so to me it all seems like a bit of "the sky is falling", but as I said, to each their own, everyone has a different situation and I do respect that, given how long the buyback process can take, and that some started it before the recall was expanded, I get it...
I've got an Oct. 2018 build Korean battery in my 2019 Bolt EV... apparently this is the highest risk of combinations. I also, since ownership, charge 100% to 20% regularly. So while gm hasn't defined what "deep cycling" is, I feel I'm certainly more towards the "risky" profile vs. someone who charges once a week and can keep the battery 40-80% SoC at all times. It's not uncommon in the winter for me to arrive to work under reduced propulsion, with the heat and radio off trying to make it to the charger station.
 

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I've got an Oct. 2018 build Korean battery in my 2019 Bolt EV... apparently this is the highest risk of combinations. I also, since ownership, charge 100% to 20% regularly. So while gm hasn't defined what "deep cycling" is, I feel I'm certainly more towards the "risky" profile vs. someone who charges once a week and can keep the battery 40-80% SoC at all times. It's not uncommon in the winter for me to arrive to work under reduced propulsion, with the heat and radio off trying to make it to the charger station.
And you aren't part of the first round of replacements? Wow. I am assuming you have recently checked your VIN, and it does not show open yet?
Based on what you just described, you are likely to be in the second wave of battery replacements. The first wave (which is very small, from what I understand) is already underway. Hopefully only a month or two for you?
 

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And you aren't part of the first round of replacements? Wow. I am assuming you have recently checked your VIN, and it does not show open yet?
Based on what you just described, you are likely to be in the second wave of battery replacements. The first wave (which is very small, from what I understand) is already underway. Hopefully only a month or two for you?
I haven't seen anywhere where gm has indicated how they decided on priority. I worked from home mid March 2020 - June 2021, so depending on when gm looked at history it might have showed nothing of concern for me. Now my entire company is back full time Nov. 1st (I've been in "part time" for months) and I'm back to my old ways of charging / discharging.

I checked my recall status, and this is what I see:
Recall Status: INCOMPLETE. REMEDY NOT YET AVAILABLE
 

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I haven't seen anywhere where gm has indicated how they decided on priority. I worked from home mid March 2020 - June 2021, so depending on when gm looked at history it might have showed nothing of concern for me. Now my entire company is back full time Nov. 1st (I've been in "part time" for months) and I'm back to my old ways of charging / discharging.

I checked my recall status, and this is what I see:
Recall Status: INCOMPLETE. REMEDY NOT YET AVAILABLE
They haven't given specifics, but we know fires have been clustered in the 19s with similar build dates. I cannot imagine any of the Korean made MY 2019 batteries will fall very far down the list.
 

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I haven't seen anywhere where gm has indicated how they decided on priority.
Nothing too specific, but there was mention of manufacturing records being used.

Public information suggests a high risk cluster within October 2018 build dates (about 1 in 333 cars built in that month has already burned, if we assume about 2,000 cars built then and 6 fires in cars known to have been built then), but it is possible that GM has stratified risk levels within that build month based on non-public manufacturing records. I.e. it is possible that not all October 2018 cars are high risk (but then those that are could be even higher risk than public information about build dates and fires suggests).

Your described use (charging to 100% and discharging to 20%) fits what GM has publicly indicated to be a high risk use profile, so if GM is using use patterns from OnStar to prioritize, your car may be among an earlier group relative to other cars with the same base risk from manufacturing records.
 

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@rlhammon @EV Fan

Looks like, based on the few forum members whose cars were in the first group (see Post when you are Notified to have your Battery Replaced ), GM apparently sees not all October 2018 build date cars as the highest risk cars. One November 2018 build date car has been reported in the first group, while two October 2018 build date cars are not in the first group. There have been two fires in November 2018 build date cars, versus six fires in October 2018 build date cars.
 

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@rlhammon @EV Fan

Looks like, based on the few forum members whose cars were in the first group (see Post when you are Notified to have your Battery Replaced ), GM apparently sees not all October 2018 build date cars as the highest risk cars. One November 2018 build date car has been reported in the first group, while two October 2018 build date cars are not in the first group. There have been two fires in November 2018 build date cars, versus six fires in October 2018 build date cars.
Indeed. Production date of the battery itself is probably more important to GM than build date of the vehicle. While the two will generally line up fairly closely, they will not be identical. I am familiar with one additional Bolt owner who is part of the first round (not on the forum). The build date for his car was early November, 2018.
 

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The additional risk of having dealers replace modules [instead of the full pack] is something I'd expect GM to avoid. It's a non-trivial process, and as others have pointed out, the opportunities for f*cking it up are plentiful. Replacing the full pack is relatively simple. Maybe GM will go through all the returned packs and re-purpose the modules if they figure out a way to verify they don't have the defects. It'd make a lot of powerwalls...
Let's see now - I've been charging my 2021 Bolt to 100% for more than a year. So far, it hasn't burned up or burned down my house - either is OK with me but so far, no such luck. This is a great car, we love it and have no interest in replacing it. No matter how much hand=wringing goes on, I plan to continue to charging the car to 100% capacity.
 

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I am sure we all received this email this morning from GM regarding the battery replacements:

Bolt Action,

We are grateful for your patience as we work to advance solutions for your Chevrolet Bolt EV/EUV. Our team is diligently working on solutions to address key concerns we know you are having during this time.

Initial replacement battery modules for Bolt EVs and Bolt EUVs have begun shipping to certain Chevrolet EV dealers. If your battery was manufactured during specific build timeframes where we believe battery defects appear to be clustered, you will be among the first to be scheduled for repair. Once your replacement battery modules are available, you will receive a communication from us asking you to contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer to schedule a service appointment. Once service is complete, your battery will be covered by an 8‑year/100,000-mile limited parts warranty.1

The battery module repair will take approximately two days to complete, and we will provide courtesy or rental vehicle transportation to you during the replacement procedure. Your dealer will have more details regarding transportation options. The service will be performed by Chevrolet dealer technicians who are specially trained in EV service and who have received detailed instructions on completing these hardware repairs.

We are also on track to begin roll out of a new advanced diagnostic software by mid-November. Once your software is available, you will receive a communication from us asking you to contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer to schedule a service appointment to have the software installed. The diagnostic will be designed to detect specific abnormalities that might indicate a damaged battery in Bolt EV and EUVs by: monitoring the battery performance; alerting customers of any anomalies; and prioritizing damaged batteries for replacement. It is our intent that further diagnostic software will allow customers to return to a 100% state of charge once all diagnostic processes are complete.

In the meantime, please look out for follow-up communications with an update on your vehicle. For any additional questions visit www.chevy.com/boltevrecall or contact the Chevrolet EV Concierge at 1-833-EVCHEVY (available Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. – midnight ET; Saturday and Sunday, from noon – 9 p.m. ET) or contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer.

We sincerely appreciate your patience and loyalty as we continue our journey to an all-electric future.

Steve Hill
Vice President, Chevrolet


I never get any of these emails, etc. I only get US mail contact (and that usually 1-2 months after I read here about everyone else being contacted).

How do I get on this email list?!
 

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I never get any of these emails, etc. I only get US mail contact (and that usually 1-2 months after I read here about everyone else being contacted).

How do I get on this email list?!
From what I gather, the email list inclusion comes through the Chevy dealer who sells the vehicles. But once a person is on the list then the GM concierge people can edit the name or address as needed.
 

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I am sure we all received this email this morning from GM regarding the battery replacements:

Bolt Action,

We are grateful for your patience as we work to advance solutions for your Chevrolet Bolt EV/EUV. Our team is diligently working on solutions to address key concerns we know you are having during this time.

Initial replacement battery modules for Bolt EVs and Bolt EUVs have begun shipping to certain Chevrolet EV dealers. If your battery was manufactured during specific build timeframes where we believe battery defects appear to be clustered, you will be among the first to be scheduled for repair. Once your replacement battery modules are available, you will receive a communication from us asking you to contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer to schedule a service appointment. Once service is complete, your battery will be covered by an 8‑year/100,000-mile limited parts warranty.1

The battery module repair will take approximately two days to complete, and we will provide courtesy or rental vehicle transportation to you during the replacement procedure. Your dealer will have more details regarding transportation options. The service will be performed by Chevrolet dealer technicians who are specially trained in EV service and who have received detailed instructions on completing these hardware repairs.

We are also on track to begin roll out of a new advanced diagnostic software by mid-November. Once your software is available, you will receive a communication from us asking you to contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer to schedule a service appointment to have the software installed. The diagnostic will be designed to detect specific abnormalities that might indicate a damaged battery in Bolt EV and EUVs by: monitoring the battery performance; alerting customers of any anomalies; and prioritizing damaged batteries for replacement. It is our intent that further diagnostic software will allow customers to return to a 100% state of charge once all diagnostic processes are complete.

In the meantime, please look out for follow-up communications with an update on your vehicle. For any additional questions visit www.chevy.com/boltevrecall or contact the Chevrolet EV Concierge at 1-833-EVCHEVY (available Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. – midnight ET; Saturday and Sunday, from noon – 9 p.m. ET) or contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer.

We sincerely appreciate your patience and loyalty as we continue our journey to an all-electric future.

Steve Hill
Vice President, Chevrolet


After getting this email, I called the concierge for the first time, and the man who answered was a nice guy, and did his best, but it was shocking how little info he had. For every question I had, he had to go online and look for an answer while we were on the phone. GM is not informing their own employees about what is going on with the Bolt recall.
 

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I am sure we all received this email this morning from GM regarding the battery replacements:

Bolt Action,

We are grateful for your patience as we work to advance solutions for your Chevrolet Bolt EV/EUV. Our team is diligently working on solutions to address key concerns we know you are having during this time.

Initial replacement battery modules for Bolt EVs and Bolt EUVs have begun shipping to certain Chevrolet EV dealers. If your battery was manufactured during specific build timeframes where we believe battery defects appear to be clustered, you will be among the first to be scheduled for repair. Once your replacement battery modules are available, you will receive a communication from us asking you to contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer to schedule a service appointment. Once service is complete, your battery will be covered by an 8‑year/100,000-mile limited parts warranty.1

The battery module repair will take approximately two days to complete, and we will provide courtesy or rental vehicle transportation to you during the replacement procedure. Your dealer will have more details regarding transportation options. The service will be performed by Chevrolet dealer technicians who are specially trained in EV service and who have received detailed instructions on completing these hardware repairs.

We are also on track to begin roll out of a new advanced diagnostic software by mid-November. Once your software is available, you will receive a communication from us asking you to contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer to schedule a service appointment to have the software installed. The diagnostic will be designed to detect specific abnormalities that might indicate a damaged battery in Bolt EV and EUVs by: monitoring the battery performance; alerting customers of any anomalies; and prioritizing damaged batteries for replacement. It is our intent that further diagnostic software will allow customers to return to a 100% state of charge once all diagnostic processes are complete.

In the meantime, please look out for follow-up communications with an update on your vehicle. For any additional questions visit www.chevy.com/boltevrecall or contact the Chevrolet EV Concierge at 1-833-EVCHEVY (available Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. – midnight ET; Saturday and Sunday, from noon – 9 p.m. ET) or contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer.

We sincerely appreciate your patience and loyalty as we continue our journey to an all-electric future.

Steve Hill
Vice President, Chevrolet


We are unable to drive our 2020 Bolt to Chicago from Cleveland in the event that we need to close a real estate deal, as a result of the charge and mileage limitations, so I texted with Brian at the boltevrecall site, asking if Chevy/GM would support a rental car should we need to travel to Chicago. The answer has limitations, but GM will pay $46. USD a day and reimburse 0.15 cents per mile for fuel if one rents a Chevy vehicle through Hertz and alerts Hertz to one's situation per Chevy. Brian also intimated that GM may reimburse the entire cost of the rental. I thought this was worth sharing, should anyone be in a familiar situation.
Of course we want the car made whole around charge and mileage, but we are retired, have just the Bolt, and have time to await the fix, as we love the car. I hope those with earlier models receive satisfaction sooner than later, and hope the Chevy/GM promise mentioned above is of some help in whatever way they may serve you.
I also wanted to mention that our dealership, here in Cleveland, will lend no support to the idea of rental and is only vaguely communicative about their own ability to support repairs. They don't seem to know much more than I do, or don't want to. I'm sure we'll have a qualified dealership in our area for a proper repair.
 

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I am sure we all received this email this morning from GM regarding the battery replacements:

Bolt Action,

We are grateful for your patience as we work to advance solutions for your Chevrolet Bolt EV/EUV. Our team is diligently working on solutions to address key concerns we know you are having during this time.

Initial replacement battery modules for Bolt EVs and Bolt EUVs have begun shipping to certain Chevrolet EV dealers. If your battery was manufactured during specific build timeframes where we believe battery defects appear to be clustered, you will be among the first to be scheduled for repair. Once your replacement battery modules are available, you will receive a communication from us asking you to contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer to schedule a service appointment. Once service is complete, your battery will be covered by an 8‑year/100,000-mile limited parts warranty.1

The battery module repair will take approximately two days to complete, and we will provide courtesy or rental vehicle transportation to you during the replacement procedure. Your dealer will have more details regarding transportation options. The service will be performed by Chevrolet dealer technicians who are specially trained in EV service and who have received detailed instructions on completing these hardware repairs.

We are also on track to begin roll out of a new advanced diagnostic software by mid-November. Once your software is available, you will receive a communication from us asking you to contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer to schedule a service appointment to have the software installed. The diagnostic will be designed to detect specific abnormalities that might indicate a damaged battery in Bolt EV and EUVs by: monitoring the battery performance; alerting customers of any anomalies; and prioritizing damaged batteries for replacement. It is our intent that further diagnostic software will allow customers to return to a 100% state of charge once all diagnostic processes are complete.

In the meantime, please look out for follow-up communications with an update on your vehicle. For any additional questions visit www.chevy.com/boltevrecall or contact the Chevrolet EV Concierge at 1-833-EVCHEVY (available Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. – midnight ET; Saturday and Sunday, from noon – 9 p.m. ET) or contact your preferred Chevrolet EV dealer.

We sincerely appreciate your patience and loyalty as we continue our journey to an all-electric future.

Steve Hill
Vice President, Chevrolet


I didn't receive this and am grateful to you for posting it. Thanks!
 
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