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Also, I should have mentioned this, but if you don't understand how it works, and would like to (or if anyone reading this in the future would like to).. Look at your meter when you think the draw is high, and you'll see your house's draw (measured in kW). Let's say it's 4.0kW. that's 4000W. Since you have 240V service, to figure out the amps you're using divide 4000W by 240V and you get 16.7A. In a perfect world, you'd be pulling 16.7A from each of the two 120v wires I mentioned in the above msg. Absolute worst case scenario would be you're pulling 33.4A from one wire, and 0 from the other (though this would not be possible if any of the load came from 240V devices like stoves, since they have to pull from each). In actuality, you're likely pulling around 19 from one wire, and 14 from the other. Adding 40A to each of these (since your 240v lvl 2 charger pulls from both) means the highest one is now 59A. Now you absolutely can't be at 90% of your limit, as inevitably some fluctuation will blow your mains. But in this example you're <60%. No problem. Though it wouldn't hurt to inquire about service upgrades anyway. I'm pretty sure where I live, if you have <125A service, they will upgrade you for free, if you run the new feed from your panel to the top of your mast.
 

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Contact your electricity provider.

When I built my garage I contacted the company we get our electricity from and had to fill out a form about the size of the garage, the various electrical tools I'd be using in it, the reason for the tools, etc. They ran a separate electrical service line/meter to my garage and it cost me $200. That was great. A few years later the service to my house was upgraded from 150 amps to 200 amps and it cost about $1500. No idea why the difference, no one I talked to could explain it to me (or would explain it to me.)

Doesn't hurt to call and ask about the cost of upgrading the house or running separate power/meter to the garage. Might depend on where you live whether they will or what they charge.
 

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I had a leaf for years, some of this is yet still new to me. I will rarely need much range, but if I do go on a "long" trip and decide I want to charge it back up (fast) once I get home I can always stop at a local charge place, eat dinner/have a beer, and let it charge there fast....Otherwise I'll use my solar and a 16amp 240 volt plug (that I used on the Leaf) at home.
So, maybe just get a slower charge cable and run with that, but if you find you need to go from very low to near full on a daily basis it sounds like you need to upgrade other things. This circuit comes from a box outside of the home separate of the home service breaker box.
If your electricians are not able to figure it out, maybe use a different company?
 

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A 16 amp EVSE will take my Bolt from 10% to 100% in the time between when I get home from work and when I leave for work the next morning. My commute is only about 32 miles, so that's overkill, anyway. Full disclosure: I have a 32 amp EVSE at home. My car is usually finished charging before dinner. But me portable is a 16 amp 120/240V unit.
 

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You can install a 240 volt 20A outlet. Then use an adapter to convert to a standard 120 outlet and plug the level 1 plug on the OEM EVSE into that. You will get level 1 charging at 12 amps/240 volts instead of 120 volts, so twice as fast as level 1 but about 65% slower than level 2 32 amps. That will replace about 10 miles per hour or about100 miles overnight (10 hours) so if you drive less than 700 miles per week that should be adequate.
 

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You can install a 240 volt 20A outlet. Then use an adapter to convert to a standard 120 outlet and plug the level 1 plug on the OEM EVSE into that. You will get level 1 charging at 12 amps/240 volts instead of 120 volts, so twice as fast as level 1 but about 65% slower than level 2 32 amps. That will replace about 10 miles per hour or about100 miles overnight (10 hours) so if you drive less than 700 miles per week that should be adequate.
It is important to note that many NEMA 14-50 to NEMA 5-15 adapters will only provide 120V. You need one that connects both hot wires to the hot and neutral pins of the 5-15 outlet in order to get 240V charging. But DON’T plug an any 120V appliances into this adapter!

The adapters you typically find for campgrounds will just pass 120V to the outlet.
 

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It is important to note that many NEMA 14-50 to NEMA 5-15 adapters will only provide 120V. You need one that connects both hot wires to the hot and neutral pins of the 5-15 outlet in order to get 240V charging. But DON’T plug an any 120V appliances into this adapter!

The adapters you typically find for campgrounds will just pass 120V to the outlet.
Specifically, you want one of these:


I used one for several months with the Bolt OEM EVSE. Worked like a champ.

ga2500ev
 

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It is important to note that many NEMA 14-50 to NEMA 5-15 adapters will only provide 120V. You need one that connects both hot wires to the hot and neutral pins of the 5-15 outlet in order to get 240V charging. But DON’T plug an any 120V appliances into this adapter!

The adapters you typically find for campgrounds will just pass 120V to the outlet.
Good point.
 

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I purchased a 2022 Chevrolet Bolt the first of July, 2022. It took until the end of October, 2023 to finally get my 240 Volt receptacle installed. The receptacle was tested by the electrician who installed it and it tested out correctly. When I tried to charge my battery, it would only charge at the lower rate. I have tried to get the Watson Dealership, Tucson, Arizona to return my calls and e-mails, to no avail. I have lodged a complaint with the GMC customer service, but have received no reply. What should I do?
 

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I purchased a 2022 Chevrolet Bolt the first of July, 2022. It took until the end of October, 2023 to finally get my 240 Volt receptacle installed. The receptacle was tested by the electrician who installed it and it tested out correctly. When I tried to charge my battery, it would only charge at the lower rate. I have tried to get the Watson Dealership, Tucson, Arizona to return my calls and e-mails, to no avail. I have lodged a complaint with the GMC customer service, but have received no reply. What should I do?
I am pretty sure that there is only one charge rate for the level 2 side of the OEM charger and that is 32 amps.
What is the circuit breaker amps for the 240 outlet?
Which EVSE are you using?
 

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I purchased a 2022 Chevrolet Bolt the first of July, 2022. It took until the end of October, 2023 to finally get my 240 Volt receptacle installed. The receptacle was tested by the electrician who installed it and it tested out correctly. When I tried to charge my battery, it would only charge at the lower rate. I have tried to get the Watson Dealership, Tucson, Arizona to return my calls and e-mails, to no avail. I have lodged a complaint with the GMC customer service, but have received no reply. What should I do?
Do you have the 32 amp dual voltage EVSE or the L1 EVSE? If you plug a 240V EVSE into a NEMA 14-50 receptacle and it is giving you L1 charging rates (something between 0.9 and 1.4kW) then they wired the receptacle wrong. They wired the neutral where one of the hot wires is supposed to go. You can check this with a multimeter set to AC volts (sometimes shown as ~V). Check the voltage between the two side slots in the receptacle. You should get ~240V. From either side slot to neutral (the other one that's the same shape as the two side slots) you'll get ~120V.
 
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