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Here's my little idea....
When folks buy a car, they shop for a car that suits their worst case needs because they only have ONE car or it is expensive to license and insure more than one.

Here's an example. A coworker of mine drives 35 miles one way to work. He's got 3 boys and on weekends is running them to baseball tournaments. A small car like a Bolt would be great for his day to day work commute, but instead he's got a Honda Pilot (Ford SUV before that). The reason? The state charges him approx $400 a year tax on each car, and insurance is higher than that per car.

If he could get a deal from the state to license a 2nd car for, say an extra $25 - $50 instead of $400, and his insurance was likewise cheaper he'd wouldn't mind. The idea being that he can only operate ONE vehicle at a time.

Yes, I know there's a thing called a car payment, but once his SUV was paid off, he has that money to apply to a newer car if he chooses. Besides if you are only driving a car on the weekends (kids sports, trips to Home Depot, etc), you aren't going to put many miles on it. It would literally last forever.

So in a nutshell, I'm wondering if the states would ever decide to allow people with SUVs to license a 2nd economy (or electric) car for a pittance. The states these days wanna say they are "green", so make them incentivize people buying better commuter cars.

fantasy world off.. carry on.
 

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Not sure what country you're from but in the US, the registration (license in your words) is couple $/month roughly. The bigger concern IMO of more than one car is sales tax. Here in NY, it's about 8%+-. If you only keep your car a few years, that $3k/36 months is $83/month. My gas car is a 2005 BMW 545 that rarely gets driven but it's so cheap to just have for those dozen or so trips my EV can't do a year, I've decided to keep it. The insurance is also throttled down based on use. Insurance for the BMW is $500/year but my Leaf is $750/year.
 

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"Would ever decide..." probably never.
My simplistic analysis.
His Honda Pilot probably gets roughly 25 mpg on his commute so he burns $8-9 a day in gas commuting? Think you can have a TCO of $9 a day on a BEV?

Edit: I'll add the insurance is dreadfully expensive in my state and registration fees are not cheap either, $550 for 2 medium priced vehicles.
 

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Do you happen to live in Colorado? Here you're paying for two things when you register a vehicle:
  1. Registration fee
  2. Ownership tax
It is the ownership tax which results in the high "registration" fee as it is collected at the time of registration (thus resulting in people confusing it with the registration fee and why I used quotes around registration). Even if one skips a year the ownership tax is still due and will be collected the next time the vehicle is registered (though I think this only applies for a single year and not multiple years).

I found this post interesting as the annual registration / insurance cost was a factor. Not for the Bolt but for the car I wanted to keep "in the wings" as a backup. I really didn't want to register and insure three vehicles given how little I drive.
 

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My surprise is the assumption that all "folks" only have ONE car.

My family has two - one for each "parent". While that ('that' being two cars) probably isn't true for single-parent households, or singles, I think that most couples (that don't live downtown in mega-cities) have two cars.
 

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Interesting idea, but the big expenditure isn't registration and insurance, it's depreciation. Depreciation is normally the #1 cost of vehicle ownership by a large margin, and vehicles depreciate even when they are hardly driven.

Vehicles are already underutilized. The average car goes unutilized 95% of the time. What you propose would push both vehicles to 97.5%. Those are 2 big costs for 2 rarely used vehicles.

Older generations have more of an ownership mindset, while younger generations are more open to sharing. A good solution would be to trade vehicles with someone you trust on those rare instances where an EV is not practical. I'd loan most any vehicle I owned to most any friend or family member. I only keep respectful and dependable friends, so I've got no hesitation to help where I can.

I'd say EVs are the biggest hurdle to EV adoption, not lack of government subsidy. Perhaps eliminating oil subsidy would help reflect the true cost of fossil fuels, which would further the strengths of EV ownership.
 

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Interesting idea, but the big expenditure isn't registration and insurance, it's depreciation. Depreciation is normally the #1 cost of vehicle ownership by a large margin, and vehicles depreciate even when they are hardly driven.

Vehicles are already underutilized. The average car goes unutilized 95% of the time. What you propose would push both vehicles to 97.5%. Those are 2 big costs for 2 rarely used vehicles.

Older generations have more of an ownership mindset, while younger generations are more open to sharing. A good solution would be to trade vehicles with someone you trust on those rare instances where an EV is not practical. I'd loan most any vehicle I owned to most any friend or family member. I only keep respectful and dependable friends, so I've got no hesitation to help where I can.

I'd say EVs are the biggest hurdle to EV adoption, not lack of government subsidy. Perhaps eliminating oil subsidy would help reflect the true cost of fossil fuels, which would further the strengths of EV ownership.
Until such time as they're involved in an accident and you're named in a lawsuit.
 

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My surprise is the assumption that all "folks" only have ONE car.

My family has two - one for each "parent". While that ('that' being two cars) probably isn't true for single-parent households, or singles, I think that most couples (that don't live downtown in mega-cities) have two cars.
Two? Just the wife and I and we have five and one motorcycle registered and insured. And I have five more cars in case I have trouble with those. Okay, maybe I'll be downsizing soon. First got to get the head repaired on one, transmission on another, a clutch and valve seals on one, fuel injection on another, and the list goes on. With the Bolt there's nothing to work on and all of sudden I'm tired of working on cars. Maybe just haul them off instead.
 

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Until such time as they're involved in an accident and you're named in a lawsuit.
I'd rather be generous than to live in fear of the unlikely, accepting the consequences regardless.

With the Bolt there's nothing to work on and all of sudden I'm tired of working on cars. Maybe just haul them off instead.
Dad just mentioned that their Camry has a worn pulley that will require him to take the accessory belt off and hunt for the noise maker. I remarked that if they had an EV, they would not have those frequent type of mechanical issues.

My current list is a Prius, Acura TSX, Pickup, motorcycle, and Mazda CX-5. Now I work from home and my wife walks 5 minutes to work.

My grandmother alone has 3 Chevy pickups, an old Buick, and a Cadillac, and no longer drives. She'll never sell any of them because the money isn't as important to her as keeping things the way they are.

Alright, I'm rambling, but I agree that many of us have every reason for at least 1 vehicle to be an EV. I'll pare down my stable and pick up an EV someday, hopefully after this year living in an apartment.
 

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I'd rather be generous than to live in fear of the unlikely, accepting the consequences regardless.
Until such time as you're named in a lawsuit as a result of that generosity.

You may think such a situation is unlikely but it's more common than I think you're giving it credit for. Likewise are you really willing to accept the consequences? Are you willing to loose your house? Your life's savings? All of your other assets? Perhaps you don't have much to loose (I get the impression you're younger and thus you may not have built up many assets) but once you do you have to be wary of the risks your generosity could expose you to.
 

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Until such time as you're named in a lawsuit as a result of that generosity.

You may think such a situation is unlikely but it's more common than I think you're giving it credit for. Likewise are you really willing to accept the consequences? Are you willing to loose your house? Your life's savings? All of your other assets? Perhaps you don't have much to loose (I get the impression you're younger and thus you may not have built up many assets) but once you do you have to be wary of the risks your generosity could expose you to.
Auto insurance takes care of this so you don't have to live in fear of being sued
 

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I'd rather be generous than to live in fear of the unlikely, accepting the consequences regardless.
Until such time as you're named in a lawsuit as a result of that generosity.
Auto insurance takes care of this so you don't have to live in fear of being sued
Ever checked the liability limits on your auto insurance?

A slightly OT rant, but should owners of any vehicle with a value exceeding the national average should be required to carry his own 'affluent replacement cost' umbrella? Worst case, a Bugatti Veyron owner and a single mother driving a twenty-year-old van have an "equally-at-fault" collision and they're both declared totally destroyed. In theory, the mom carrying state-required minimum liability could be on the hook for another $2,000,000+ in damages.

jack vines
 

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Ever checked the liability limits on your auto insurance?

A slightly OT rant, but should owners of any vehicle with a value exceeding the national average should be required to carry his own 'affluent replacement cost' umbrella? Worst case, a Bugatti Veyron owner and a single mother driving a twenty-year-old van have an "equally-at-fault" collision and they're both declared totally destroyed. In theory, the mom carrying state-required minimum liability could be on the hook for another $2,000,000+ in damages.

jack vines
Yes, I have $500k liability limit and a separate umbrella policy.

I happen to share your belief that people putting a Bugatti on the road should bear a substantial portion of the risk that someone damages their $1M+ car.

While it is true that it is always possible to cause damage in excess of any particular insurance policy, the other reality is that my insurance will defend any claim against me, even a claim in excess of my coverage and if someone isn't willing to settle for my policy limits they would be looking at collecting nothing for possibly years. And in the case of some poor person with minimum liability limits they would be looking at either accepting the limits or potentially getting nothing because bankruptcy would likely be her best option.

So, IMO, I look at insurance as an inducement to encourage a settlement. The more you are worth the bigger that potential inducement may need to be (poor people can get by with minimum coverage, if you are rich you better have more coverage).
 

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Auto insurance takes care of this so you don't have to live in fear of being sued
Will it? Does your policy cover other drivers? What if they're driving recklessly? Or under the influence? Do you carry sufficient coverage to cover a multi-million dollar lawsuit? Even if insurance will cover it you still have the headache of a lawsuit. Do you really want that?

Not trying to be a buzz kill on your generosity but what I've said is, unfortunately, reality.
 

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Yes, I have $500k liability limit and a separate umbrella policy.

I happen to share your belief that people putting a Bugatti on the road should bear a substantial portion of the risk that someone damages their $1M+ car.

While it is true that it is always possible to cause damage in excess of any particular insurance policy, the other reality is that my insurance will defend any claim against me, even a claim in excess of my coverage and if someone isn't willing to settle for my policy limits they would be looking at collecting nothing for possibly years. And in the case of some poor person with minimum liability limits they would be looking at either accepting the limits or potentially getting nothing because bankruptcy would likely be her best option.

So, IMO, I look at insurance as an inducement to encourage a settlement. The more you are worth the bigger that potential inducement may need to be (poor people can get by with minimum coverage, if you are rich you better have more coverage).
I don't believe court judgments can be discharged through bankruptcy.
 
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