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I looked to see if this had been answered directly, and didn't find an existing thread on this.

I've been shopping Bolts for a couple of weeks now in the California SF Bay Area, and while most dealerships had EVSE's set up, one did not. They had a cable with a J1772 on one end and a NEMA 14-50 on the other. Nothing but wire in between.

I've seen a few posts claim that much of the charging management for the bolt is already onboard, and the functions of an EVSE are redundant.

Apologies if this is a dense question, I'm new to the electric car thing.
 

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That cord you saw probably is one of the new miniaturized EVSEs with the logic and switching circuits built right into the handle.

What that circuitry does is to not allow any current to flow until it sees a valid connection and communication with the car that tells it what voltage and current to flow to the car. This also protects the user against electrocution hazard.

And, the car will not charge from any cord or device that does not follow the proper standard, so you have no choice.
 

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To expound on sharkvolt's reply and to clearly answer your question: Yes, an EVSE is required for L1 or L2 charging. But some EVSEs may be larger than others. The car's software interfaces with the EVSE and draws no more power that what the EVSE advertises as being available.
 

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The "Electric Vehicle Standard Equipment" (EVSE) was defined by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) to be the standard for a safe EV charge, anywhere for any brand. Only Tesla Motors and Nissan/Renault have their own standards. The Nissan Leaf does allow a SAE J1772 EVSE to charge it in addition to the Nissan CHAdeMO. And the TM models can use an adapter to charge from a SAE J1772 EVSE.

So everyione who wants to charge a plug-in hybrid or a pure battery electric car must use an EVSE in the U.S. and in many other nations. You can search the web for the definition of the EVSE, and how to create your own from parts. I bought a Level 2 JuiceBox EVSE kit in 2014, assembled and installed it (it is listed in my signature and on PlugShare), where it is set to 7.2 kW since June 2014 and waiting for my first EV. GM probably read my posts at GM-Volt.com and set the 2017 Chevy Bolt EV to charge at my rate!
 

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To net this out, Yes, you need an EVSE for any form of charging from 120/240v. It talks to the onboard charger which is in the car.
 

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Well, if you DO NOT CARE FOR SAFETY OR BEING LEGAL AT ALL, maybe you don't.

All you need is connect the proximity pin to the ground pin over a 330 ohm resistor and connect a power source that produces a 1 kHz pulse wave at +/- 12 volt with 50% duty cycle to the pilot pin and the ground pin, with a 1000 ohm resistor between the source and the pilot pin.

But as explained before, this is potentially dangerous and in many countries not legal. If you do care for safety and being legal, then yes, you do need an EVSE ;-)
 

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And since the car cannot tell what maximum current your wiring is rated for, you could burn down the garage/house if it is only 12- or 14-ga wire or the aluminum that was used in some houses.
 

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Well, if you DO NOT CARE FOR SAFETY OR BEING LEGAL AT ALL, maybe you don't.

All you need is connect the proximity pin to the ground pin over a 330 ohm resistor and connect a power source that produces a 1 kHz pulse wave at +/- 12 volt with 50% duty cycle to the pilot pin and the ground pin, with a 1000 ohm resistor between the source and the pilot pin.

But as explained before, this is potentially dangerous and in many countries not legal. If you do care for safety and being legal, then yes, you do need an EVSE ;-)
Assume one can figure out how to wire a J1772 plug (5-wires) to a 3-wire 10ga plugged cable. Say 120v 30A circuit.

If you then plug 'er into your Bolt ? Will the Bolt accept it for charging without having the proper communications and safety protocols ?
 

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If it did so at a relatively low rate, would that be an issue? Shavers, hairdryers and lawnmowers do exactly the same thing ;-)
 

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Handheld appliances don't draw 7500 watts.
Why are you wasting our time asking these silly questions?
If you can afford the car, you will get at 120v EVSE with it, and you can buy a 240v version on eBay for under $200.
 

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If it did so at a relatively low rate, would that be an issue? Shavers, hairdryers and lawnmowers do exactly the same thing ;-)
Shavers, hairdryers and lawnmowers don't pull 12 amps on a 120V circuit. That rate garners 3-4 miles of range per hour of charging. Cutting it down to the rate your shave pulls would take how long to recharge the Bolt? Weeks?

Older EV conversions didn't utilize the J1772 standard, and had the ability to plug in directly. Some methods were/are safer than others.

The White Zombie charge connector on the car is "hot" directly to the battery @ 400V. Sticking your fingers in that socket is not recommended. Things get interesting when you short a Li-Ion pack that holds enough juice to power an EV.

Suddenly, the arc flashed into a higher state, and a brilliant blue plasma ball, maybe 6 inches in diameter, formed and seemed to float just above the batteries….it was as if an alien being had taken over the car, and it was scary as ****!...

Bruce had grabbed a nearby towel and had soaked it in the standing rain puddles, then threw it over the plasma ball, but like an insatiable monster, it quickly ingested the fabric and the was towel was vaporized in an instant.

I ran for the fire extinguisher, and as I passed through the house (no extinguisher out in the shop!) I yelled to my fully-assembled family, “The car’s melting down!” Running back to the car, I unloaded the contents of the extinguisher into battery compartment, but the plasma ball refused to quit and kept on plasmasizing (Is that a word?). It was relentless and unaffected by our attempts to kill it, and it continued to flare for about two straight minutes.

Finally, it went super nova, and shrank back to a white dwarf….
Full account of how "Plasma Boy" got his nickname:
http://www.plasmaboyracing.com/blog/?page_id=10

The redundant safety features of the J1772 standard do have a purpose, and the connector itself is designed for a much higher duty cycle of plug/unplug than any household outlet can withstand.
 

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Handheld appliances don't draw 7500 watts.
I did say "If it did so at a relatively low rate", didn't I? The Bolt is capable of limiting its power consumption to 12 amps @ 120 volt. Or even 8 amps @ 120 volt. Probably even less. Much less than many common appliances. If the Bolt would limit itself to 1440 watts (or even 960 watts) without pilot signal and only would go higher if there was a decent pilot signal, I wouldn't be worried about that.

whether that suits your needs is a different topic.

Why are you wasting our time asking these silly questions?
Are you serious? If your time was so valuable, you would not be spending it on this forum, would you? :D
 

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Shavers, hairdryers and lawnmowers don't pull 12 amps on a 120V circuit. That rate garners 3-4 miles of range per hour of charging. Cutting it down to the rate your shave pulls would take how long to recharge the Bolt? Weeks?

Older EV conversions didn't utilize the J1772 standard, and had the ability to plug in directly. Some methods were/are safer than others.

The White Zombie charge connector on the car is "hot" directly to the battery @ 400V. Sticking your fingers in that socket is not recommended. Things get interesting when you short a Li-Ion pack that holds enough juice to power an EV.


Full account of how "Plasma Boy" got his nickname:
http://www.plasmaboyracing.com/blog/?page_id=10

The redundant safety features of the J1772 standard do have a purpose, and the connector itself is designed for a much higher duty cycle of plug/unplug than any household outlet can withstand.
It appears to me that this story does not apply to Level 2 charging. As it is talking about a 400 volt connector directly to the battery ....
 

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Again, A E, why are you wasting our time? If you ever own a Bolt or other electric car, you will charge it using an EVSE. Any discussion of this is simply senseless.
End of Communication on this pointless topic.
 

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Again, A E, why are you wasting our time? If you ever own a Bolt or other electric car, you will charge it using an EVSE. Any discussion of this is simply senseless.
End of Communication on this pointless topic.
That response is a little bit narcissistic, don't you think? ;)

From a brain-dead-consumer perspective you are probably right. But for that perspective, we can simply visit the GM website or the local dealership. The nice thing about forums like this is that we can share more in-depth insights that we cannot get from the GM website or a GM sales rep. I think this is partly the reason why people ask questions here, rather than at the dealership. If you consider sharing such insights a waste of time, well .... IMHO that would be your problem.

BTW: I do own a (PH)EV (have owned it for several years) and I have charged it without an EVSE. Yesterday evening, I have successfully tested my first working prototype of a low cost dual charger with load balancing capabilities. I have been able to create that prototype, thanks to people who have shared their deeper insights on forums just like this one. And not thanks to people who try to kill discussions they do not care for.
 

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Great - share your knowledge here instead of asking for it. It's time to pay the internet back.
 
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