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Discussion Starter #1
Hi friends!

Is it a problem if my Bolt EV is always connected to the level 2 charger (EVduty-40) when the car is not used ?

Thanks!
 

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if it sits out in the winter you probably should keep it plugged in every night. Also a good idea if you do preconditioning the next morning. There's a procedure if it's for long term storage. Many of us are speculating that using the hilltop reserve will prolong life by not continually charging to 100%. Batteries have limits of charge cycles that many of us also speculate that we shouldn't charge every day. If you lease, go ahead and plug in every day for 100%. If you plan to still have the vehicle in 10 years, you might want to limit cycles and charge/discharge percentages. Percentages vary where some speculate low of 30% to high of 80%.
 

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I had planned to keep plugged in to a Level 2 overnight all winter (in Vermont) but also wonder if that's needed. User manual says to keep plugged in if it won't be driven for long periods ... but does not define long period. It will sit 8 hrs in the work place parking lot so why not 14 hours overnight?

I live at the top of a hill so would love to get that climb back with some regen first thing in the morning ... and I'm guessing low gear regen gets me better down hill traction than braking.

Thoughts on duration to sit un-driven in the cold (20 degF)?
 

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Not unless there is a thunderstorm in the area.
It is good to know.

Last night we had an unexpected thunder strom before the weather becomes dawm cold with snow and I let it plugged. This afetrnoon I'll go aoutside and see if everything is OK, even if at -8 C (-17 C with the wind factor) it is not very inviting to do so...
 

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I had planned to keep plugged in to a Level 2 overnight all winter (in Vermont) but also wonder if that's needed. User manual says to keep plugged in if it won't be driven for long periods ... but does not define long period. It will sit 8 hrs in the work place parking lot so why not 14 hours overnight?

I live at the top of a hill so would love to get that climb back with some regen first thing in the morning ... and I'm guessing low gear regen gets me better down hill traction than braking.

Thoughts on duration to sit un-driven in the cold (20 degF)?

I think "long periods" are weeks, not hours. As to "sit un-driven", if plugged in, probably also weeks. If unplugged, at that temp., 14 hours is probably no worse than 8 hours, but 14 days IS worse than 1 day. IF after 24 hours, you can THEN plug in and 1) recharge, 2) condition the battery, and 3) pre-condition the cabin, you are probably better off doing so. Mine will be garaged at home, in the cold at work with no chance to plug in during, or after, so I hope loss of battery delivery (and, therefore, range) is my only problem.

Questions for all: IF sitting for 8+ hours (at work) in the cold, should we: a) sit while turned on for a few (5, more?) minutes before driving, and b) should we drive any differently (speed, acceleration) for the first 5 minutes?
 

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Questions for all: IF sitting for 8+ hours (at work) in the cold, should we: a) sit while turned on for a few (5, more?) minutes before driving, and b) should we drive any differently (speed, acceleration) for the first 5 minutes?
Wouldn't worry about it. There're no mechanical components that need to warm up to operating temp to function properly, and there's essentially no oil that needs to thin out. The biggest temperature sensitive component is the battery and if you pre-condition the car the system will begin warming the battery as well if needed (from my casual observations). However I've also casually observed that when the car is cold it will somewhat limit the amount of power that it will pull from the battery under heavy acceleration, so it appears the system is protecting the cells from under-voltage conditions. It looks like GM / LG did a pretty good job of protecting the most valuable component of the car, so I'm optimistic for good long-term health of the battery and the car as a whole.

TLDR: Precondition for a few minutes if possible, otherwise just get in and drive.
 

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to answer the original question:

no it is not a problem - EVSE (EV car chargers) are either "on/off" - they are not trickle charging - for safety the car it either drawing power from the EVSE or it is completely shut-off/disconnect from the EVSE - if the car is sitting and it's fully charged - the EVSE disconnect relay will be "open" so no current will be flowing.

in a cold/hot climate it's better for an EV to be "plugged" in since the car can then draw from house power when necessary to keep the battery properly conditioned rather than using the batteries charging capacity to keep it thermally managed.
 

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to answer the original question:

no it is not a problem - EVSE (EV car chargers) are either "on/off" - they are not trickle charging - for safety the car it either drawing power from the EVSE or it is completely shut-off/disconnect from the EVSE - if the car is sitting and it's fully charged - the EVSE disconnect relay will be "open" so no current will be flowing.

in a cold/hot climate it's better for an EV to be "plugged" in since the car can then draw from house power when necessary to keep the battery properly conditioned rather than using the batteries charging capacity to keep it thermally managed.
This is true but I think one should consider the consequences of leaving an EV's battery at a high SOC for extended periods, which someone above mentioned. Too bad there isn't a "battery maintenance" mode that allows a user to select whether or not the battery is charged while it sits plugged in... I'd plug in more often if that was the case.
 

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leaving the Bolt plugged in doesn't continuously charge the Bolt keeping it "tip top"…

1. you plug the Bolt in
2. it charges to either hill-top reserve or full
3. leaving it plugged in it will not charge again until you unplug it.
4. it will use power if it needs to for battery conditioning

afaik the Bolt will not charge every time the battery drops a bit - and the vampire draw from the battery for the bolt is minimal/non-existant - so there is no reason for the system to keep charging it…
 

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Is it better for the battery to charge with the 120v charger that comes with the car so it is charging all night? Seems like if we have the range to spare it might be better to charge that way especially if it doesn't top off.

What is "hill-top reserve"?
 

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What is "hill-top reserve"?
It's a setting that limits the battery charge to 90%. The intent of this feature, and hence its name, is for people that live on a hill can have regenerative braking going down the hill after a "full" charge. If the battery is at 100%, the regenerative braking will not work as there's no where for the energy to go.
 
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