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Since there are so many fewer parts and less heat in the drivetrain compared to conventional cars, does it seem likely EVs will go to 300,000+ miles before any major failure? If not, what parts might we expect not to last as long as on a regular car, the motor, the one-speed transmission?
 

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The battery is the main weakness. Under optimal circumstances, I can see some Bolts going 300,000 on the original battery. These high mileage Bolts would likely be utilized as taxis to accumulate that many miles in a short period of time. It will be interesting to see how the car holds up 3 years from now, but we'll have moved our attention to the next generation of EVs by then.
 

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Definitely, the battery and powertrain aren't the problem, it would be the frame/body. There are already 300k+ EV's out there without any significant degradation or maintenance issues. In the northeast, corrosion is what has been the downfall of my most recent high mileage car.
 

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My brake pads might last 300,000 miles, not sure about the rest of the car.
 

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The only 300,000 EV I heard about was a company Tesloop that is basically a taxi service. It was a Model S, but it did have a motor replaced and the battery was replaced at 200,000 miles under Tesla's unlimited mileage policy. I will be happy if the original battery lasts 200,000 miles. The average mileage life of a car is somewhere around 8 years and 150,000 miles. If the battery lasts 200,000 miles the Bolt has done its job for us.
 

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I didn't see the motor replacement but the battery was replaced due to a firmware issue.


"Then, just as the car hit 200,000 miles, the range estimator became inaccurate. Though the car didn’t actually lose any range, the estimator would say it could go another ten miles—and then power down.
Tesla looked into the issue, and told Tesloop that there’s a battery chemistry state that high-mileage cars go into, and the software isn’t properly compensating for that change. There will be a firmware update in three months that will take care of the discrepancy, but Tesla just replaced the battery to solve the problem.
“We got our 6% range back with the new battery,” Sonnad said with a laugh. “But had the firmware been updated, we’d be fine and plugging along.”
https://jalopnik.com/this-is-what-happens-when-you-put-300-000-miles-on-a-te-1798662230
They fully expect to get another 900k miles logged before the warranty expires.
 

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If the battery lasts 200,000 miles the Bolt has done its job for us.
The problem is defining what you mean by "lasts." Batteries start to degrade from the minute they are made. If you need every single watt hour for you purposes, then it will be junk after a year. The question is how much hassle are you willing to put up with. If you drive 20 miles a day it may last 50 years. If you are willing, and able, to stop at a fast charger twice a day, it might outlast any ICE.
 

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The other big business that will come out of increased large capacity EV's will be refurbishing batteries. In the future you could trade out a "failing" battery with one near full capacity. Since you will be trading in your modules the cost won't be as much as you think. Replacing a Bolt EV battery in 5 years may only be $3000 to $5000.
 

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The other big business that will come out of increased large capacity EV's will be refurbishing batteries. In the future you could trade out a "failing" battery with one near full capacity. Since you will be trading in your modules the cost won't be as much as you think. Replacing a Bolt EV battery in 5 years may only be $3000 to $5000.
Somebody likely knows more about this but I saw a Youtube video where someone bought a Prius cheap with a bad battery, then swapped in only a single module from a junkyard. He emphasized how hazardous DIY battery dis-assembly is and didn't recommend it but was obviously proud of what he accomplished as an amateur.

I looked just now for that video. I see there is an active secondary market in replacement and reconditioned Prius batteries. It appears that all used cells should be of balanced capacity, something that video guy didn't consider.

Bolt will likely also have aftermarket and used/reconditioned/balanced batteries, after there are cars on the road that are beyond warranty. I expect this will eventually be as common as refilled laser printer cartridges - not as good as new, but good enough to re-power a car several years old.
 

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Somebody likely knows more about this but I saw a Youtube video where someone bought a Prius cheap with a bad battery, then swapped in only a single module from a junkyard. He emphasized how hazardous DIY battery dis-assembly is and didn't recommend it but was obviously proud of what he accomplished as an amateur.

I looked just now for that video. I see there is an active secondary market in replacement and reconditioned Prius batteries. It appears that all used cells should be of balanced capacity, something that video guy didn't consider.

Bolt will likely also have aftermarket and used/reconditioned/balanced batteries, after there are cars on the road that are beyond warranty. I expect this will eventually be as common as refilled laser printer cartridges - not as good as new, but good enough to re-power a car several years old.
Prius battery bank replacement is relatively more simple than Bolt bank replacement. The NiMH batteries are more accessible since there are fewer of them, and the thermal management is a simple air blower.

While replacing a bad cell or bank is feasible in some cases, it's often a shorter term solution since all the other cells/banks have similar amounts of use/wear and will soon degrade. If a cell or bank failed due to a manufacturing defect and all the other cells/banks are in good condition, then it makes sense to replace just the failing module. Usually though, the whole battery is worn and should be replaced.

Some Prius owners have had success using a maintenance charger for their traction battery, but Li-ion batteries are not tolerant of trickle charging. That said, I expect them to last longer than the Prius NiMh due to more intelligent battery management and thermal control.

Most everyone on here will have sold their Bolt long before the battery degrades to the point it becomes an issue.
 

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Somebody likely knows more about this but I saw a Youtube video where someone bought a Prius cheap with a bad battery, then swapped in only a single module from a junkyard. He emphasized how hazardous DIY battery dis-assembly is and didn't recommend it but was obviously proud of what he accomplished as an amateur.
Standard disclaimer any energy storage device can be dangerous. Ever seen what happens when you short the terminals of a fully charged 12v car battery!? Arc welding comes to mind. Now take that to 300-400-500 volts well the wrong thing can cause an explosion. Simple, respect it and take safety precautions. I routinely test large UPS strings, that are 580 Volts, live. Have I been shocked ..... ;) Is it dangerous, **** yes. so is working on a live electrical panel.
 

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While replacing a bad cell or bank is feasible in some cases, it's often a shorter term solution since all the other cells/banks have similar amounts of use/wear and will soon degrade.
A outfit here does a brisk business in EV battery repair/refurbishment. They refurbished my wife's Camry Hybrid battery almost 3 years ago and gave us a 24 Month warranty. 60,000 miles later - no issues. They have refurbished batteries in Fiskers, Tesla's, a lot of Leafs, even upgrading some first year Tesla's from 40kW to 75kW ... basically never turning away any EV.



They've been in business at least 9 years.
 

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Whaaaat? Since when did using the DC fast charger often prolong your battery??? :eek:
I didn't say it was good for the battery. This is how you get an EV to go further than the battery will take you on a charge. Many owners of older Leafs are doing this right now to get another six months or a year out of a car that will no longer do the job.
 

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Somebody likely knows more about this but I saw a Youtube video where someone bought a Prius cheap with a bad battery, then swapped in only a single module from a junkyard. He emphasized how hazardous DIY battery dis-assembly is and didn't recommend it but was obviously proud of what he accomplished as an amateur.

I looked just now for that video. I see there is an active secondary market in replacement and reconditioned Prius batteries. It appears that all used cells should be of balanced capacity, something that video guy didn't consider.

Bolt will likely also have aftermarket and used/reconditioned/balanced batteries, after there are cars on the road that are beyond warranty. I expect this will eventually be as common as refilled laser printer cartridges - not as good as new, but good enough to re-power a car several years old.
I think I've seen that one - a company sent him a free battery rebuild kit and it was a pretty straight forward repair. My wife's Honda Civic Hybrid's battery needed to be replaced two days after we bought it (used of course). Luckily Honda had extended the warranty up to 100,000 miles or we would have been hosed as it was close to $3000. There was one board I was on where someone did find the part number for the Bolt battery, but they never could find a price. The dealer they were talking to estimated that it would probably be close to $15,000 (or thereabouts). I've heard of Tesla packs costing twice that or more, but I have no concrete sources.

As for mileage, there is a Volt owner who has over 200,000 miles on his with next to no degradation. Chevy likes to plug the fact that they have yet to have to replace a pack in a Volt, something they can't say about the Bolt unfortunately. I also heard about the Tesla taxi (in Russia or something) with 300,000, but that was kilometers if I remember right (and I could be wrong). The same article also talked about how they had to replace the motor, etc.

If the packs can ever come down in price and the motors hold out in the long run (for any/all EVs), that would be a great thing. If it could get to the point where you could get an average refurbished pack for $3000 - $5000 or so, that would be more practical instead of buying a new $40000 car. I know the Leaf owners I have talked to said their Leaf batteries are about $5000 to replace. For what it's worth ;)
 

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A outfit here does a brisk business in EV battery repair/refurbishment. They refurbished my wife's Camry Hybrid battery almost 3 years ago and gave us a 24 Month warranty. 60,000 miles later - no issues. They have refurbished batteries in Fiskers, Tesla's, a lot of Leafs, even upgrading some first year Tesla's from 40kW to 75kW ... basically never turning away any EV.



They've been in business at least 9 years.
That's encouraging. Do you know if they'll upgrade any EV, or just Teslas that were upgradable from the manufacturer? I'm thinking past my power train warranty and if I see enough battery degradation, I might go 3rd party range upgrade. Kinda doubt they can since it will require programming a bunch of ECUs to recognize the additional capacity.
 
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