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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering about driving in L mode now that the snow is here in Toronto. In D mode I have ABS if I start to skid, but what happens in L? Is it safer to slow down on slippery roads in D or L?
 

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You still have ABS in L Mode. It all depends on the operator if it's safer or not. I don't get snow here. I would consider L Mode to be the best for the control factor. No pedal to pedal movement allows better overall control, IMO!
 

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Be careful!

I'd be concerned that the increased regenerative braking of front wheels in L mode could make the rear end swing around in snow or icy conditions.
 

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I cannot find it in the Bolt manual, but I recall reading somewhere that regen will cancel if loss of traction is detected. I don't 100% recall, but I think I did experience this when using the regen paddle on my old 2017 Chevy Volt over potholed roads. Not sure if this carries over to the Bolt but I think the rationale was if regen detects a difference in regen from a drive wheel, the braking assumes something is off about regen and aborts using it until traction comes back.

Regardless if you're in D or L, just pay attention to your speed and go easy on acceleration and deceleration. If you're don't feel proficient enough in L, stick to D. If you're now one with one-pedal driving, I don't see any difference in safety when driving in snow: your leg/foot should already know to translate your "slow driving" thoughts into appropriate "do not lift off pedal in L abruptly cause you'll slow HARD" actions.
 

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I think the regen worked amazingly well when going down snowy roads steadily with descent control and not locking up the brakes.
I couldn't get up a steep hill in 2-3 inches of slush yesterday, but interestingly, I was finally able to reverse it up very slowly successfully on stock tires.
 

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Unless you are "speeding" on slippery roads, regen braking should be a plus. The only time I experienced slick roads, it was very reassuring that the Bolt backed off so smoothly. Of course, I still have my wife's (RIP) voice in my ear telling me "Not So Fast!". So I may not be the typical foul weather driver.
 

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I think the worst thing on a slippery road would be to hit the brakes hard and skid. Regen braking would seem to be safer. If you are comfortable in “L”, you have control. Using the accelerator pedal to decrease regen runs the risk of overdoing it and accelerating, compounding your situation. Using “D” and the regen paddle may be safer if your “L” driving experience is low-time. Come the first snow, I plan to go to a near-empty parking lot and safely test out my theories.
 

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Come the first snow, I plan to go to a near-empty parking lot and safely test out my theories.
I went to a large empty parking lot at one of our local ski areas to try out the Bolt with my Michelin X-Ice XI3 tires on the front wheels. I found the tires and "L" mode worked great for me - it was easy to modulate both power and braking with just a small movement of your foot. The tires and the Bolt both performed really well.

In my opinion the biggest single thing you need to do in snow and ice conditions has nothing to do with the tires or how you brake. It's treating conditions with the proper respect and not overdriving them.
 

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The only time my wife had actual problems was on unplowed roads with a frozen base layer in L on the Michelin X-Ice 3's on fairly steep downhill stops. Once the car was almost stopped, the front axle had a slight tendency to lock up and slide towards to curb due to the crown in the road. It seemed pretty repeatable for us, and D mode made a marked improvement. On the level, there didn't seem to be a noticeable problem for us. We have stopped using L in winter conditions since we travel more slowly and "slow coast" to stops more frequently, so the regen gains were minimal. D mode is still one pedal in winter driving almost always, and matches up more closely with our gentle stopping style on slick roads.
 

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You have the stock OEM tires on the rear Sean?
Yes I do, I've been doing it for 40 years on my front wheel drive cars and it's never caused me any issues. I've heard all the objections, and I've gotten into long discussions on the topic which I don't wish to repeat hear.

Suffice it to say that I stand by my earlier statement that driving in a way that respects the road conditions is the single most important thing you need to do to stay safe. I'm not recommending it to anyone else, but for my driving style and situation it works just fine.
 

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We have stopped using L in winter conditions since we travel more slowly and "slow coast" to stops more frequently, so the regen gains were minimal.
I drive in "L" mode all the time and I "coast" to stops where the last several feet are at speeds slower than "D" mode would allow without using the brake pedal. I love being able to alter my "glideslope" with just a tiny change in pedal pressure if someone cuts in or if the car ahead moves forward a bit before I come to a complete stop.

I find that quite useful in snowy conditions because I've always got an eye out for the guy behind me. There have been a few occasions on downhill slopes where the fellow on my rear was clearly having control issues, so I slow down well short of where I need to in order to make sure that the guy behind me is able to stop. That gives me room to move forward when he isn't able to stop in time or if it appears that he has things well in hand. It's avoided an accident on a couple of occasions, and it's super easy to do in "L" mode just by varying the pedal pressure.
 

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I love being able to alter my "glideslope" with just a tiny change in pedal pressure if someone cuts in or if the car ahead moves forward a bit before I come to a complete stop.
We use the D mode in the exact same manner, adjusting the glide slope by using the accelerator pedal in combination with the regen paddle. The big advantage I find is that when reacting to unexpected human behavior on slick surfaces, the no-input deceleration ramp force is much lighter when we move to cover the brake pedal in anticipation of other driver's heading for mistakes, which I find advantageous.

We use D mode to come to complete stops without the brake pedal in normal operation.
 

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We use the D mode in the exact same manner, adjusting the glide slope by using the accelerator pedal in combination with the regen paddle. The big advantage I find is that when reacting to unexpected human behavior on slick surfaces, the no-input deceleration ramp force is much lighter when we move to cover the brake pedal in anticipation of other driver's heading for mistakes, which I find advantageous.

We use D mode to come to complete stops without the brake pedal in normal operation.
When I'm driving in "L" mode it's so rare that I have to actually use the brake pedal that it's essentially a non-issue with me. I leave a generous distance in front of me and that means the braking force available in "L" mode is almost always more than adequate. The only exceptions are for lights that turn red at just the wrong time or on some fairly steep downslopes. And in those situations having the regen ramp up fairly strongly when I take my foot off the accelerator is an advantage.

I occasionally use the regen paddle, but I don't like to get into the habit of relying on it because it's not always readily available (when the wheel is turned).

I think it's very cool that the Bolt has all these different options to suit everyone's different driving styles.
 

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True or False ?:

In a very slippery situation involving ice or near ice, under snow, upon which your Bolt arrives unexpectedly:

L mode should not be used as it may promote uncontrollable “understeer”. Whereas normal pedal braking has the advantage of ABS. When properly applied ABS braking in very slippery situation allows some steering control of vehicle. Reaction time is of the essence. Therefore the operator should always be in “two pedal” mode in conditions where such situation is possible.
:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the input. Sounds like it really comes down to preference, and of course, careful winter driving.
 

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Driving on Snow

I drove a lot in snowy weather from upstate NY to the Dakotas. I would never consider myself to be an expert.

I think we can all agree that friction on ice and snow is really low. Whatever friction is there is something you want to increase and not break (skid). I prefer a gear where my accelerator pedal will produce the longest with the least change in tire rotation speed and without bucking. Not sure what that would be in the Bolt as there is some software control built in. I assume this will be trial and error with out the error being an expensive noise.

I also stop well before a Stop sign and keep an eye to the front and rear as well as to crossing traffic. If some hot shot comes up too fast in their summer driving mode, I can move the car forward without going into the intersection and to keep from getting rear ended.
 

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I would think that in 'L' Mode with 'single' pedal would result in braking only at the front wheels, which under certain conditions could cause the rear end of the car to swing around, possibly resulting in a 180 or 360 degree spin if severe enough.

Waiting for more testing from our northern friends :)
 
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