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I have looked and looked and what I am seeing is constant disagreements on the validity of using the stock evse on a 240v line. the photo is the back of my unit. I couldn't find any threads telling me if this is one of the ones that is dual voltage usable, although all indications point to being able to use it. power here has been out all day so forgive my frustrations. I have an old water heater line which is 10/2. 30 amp. I already know that this will only deliver 12 amps...no need for debates on that. don't need an adapter as I will go to lowes and get a housing and plug to protect anyone from accidentally plugging in to this. Then, my goal is to change out the end of a custom made extention cord (this is 10/3 wire to plug into this outlet i installed. then, the other end will allow me to plug in the stock evse. the charging rates will more than suit my needs at the moment and theoretically should work. I live alone so no danger of plugging the wrong thing in. I will paint or somehow mark the extention cord on the normal 110v side. My plan is to install a dedicated line that is 40A, just not in a position to do so in the near future. I just want to know if my evse is on that is dual voltage compatible. it appears that it is considering is looks rated to 1440 watts


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Looks like the same model number as mine - lower right corner. 2325 4905, mine works fine on 240V. I first plugged just the charger into the 240V adapter without being plugged into the Bolt. After I saw a green light then I plugged into the Bolt. Mine is in a garage and I'm not fond of the idea of a 240V plug connection in a wet area. IMO would be better to buy an extension charging cable and keep the charger and it's 240V plug in the dry. Charger cord extension cables are available on Amazon and eBay - would want a heavier wire gauge though - OEM is #14 from what I hear.
 

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I would strongly advise not doing this. You will have many here tell you it is just fine and that the internal components can handle it, but no one considers the risks. What if something goes wrong and it burns your garage down? Even if no life is at risk, and even if the EVSE isn’t technically at fault, if the insurance company finds out you were using 240v on a unit only rated for 120v they will in all likelihood deny your claim and you will have to pay for a new garage (or even just the car itself...) out of pocket. It really is best to spend the few hundred dollars on a decent portable EVSE and be done with it.
 

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[QUOTE=" it appears that it is considering is looks rated to 1440 watts”[/QUOTE]

12a*120v=1440w. It is rated only for 120v, as are all EVSE included with the Bolt are. Using an adapter for 240v is outside of what they are advertised as being able to handle, even if there has been success otherwise, it is not meant for it.
 

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I believe it has been mentioned many times that this EVSE is the same that is used in other countries with 230V. The electrical plug would have a molded connector to match the sockets installed in the homes.
Since this is sold in the USA where 120V is standard in homes, and the EVSE comes with a 120V plug, it would be unwise to print on the EVSE that it is 240V capable if it has a 120V plug. It would cause confusion. GM would never advise you to make a 240V to 120V adapter. So owners must use it at their own risk if such adapter is made or used.
I believe that it has been established this EVSE is capable of operating on 240V. Has anyone ever reported one catching on fire?
 

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<--plugged in to 240v 24/7 and it stays cool, the body of the EVSE and the connectors.
 

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Im sure you are right about it being able to handle 240v. All im saying is why take the risk for something that, for one, doesnt work nearly as well as a cheap actual 240v evse, and also, if anything goes wrong with wiring, even if its not the fault of this unit technically, might result in insurance denying a claim. Why take the risk to save $300 on a $30k car?
 

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[QUOTE=" it appears that it is considering is looks rated to 1440 watts”

12a*120v=1440w. It is rated only for 120v, as are all EVSE included with the Bolt are. Using an adapter for 240v is outside of what they are advertised as being able to handle, even if there has been success otherwise, it is not meant for it.
Most computers and network appliances are dual voltage rated, and come with cords for the destination country which typically means 120V.

A few years ago, my office moved and the new data center was equipped with 240V outlets for all of the computers. With > $1M in equipment for my little "lab", and probably > $150M for the rest of the lab, they chose 240V because it is more efficient and generates less heat. 5 years in and no failures due to power.

The OEM unit is the same one used in other countries, albeit with a different plug to match the destination country. It has been analyzed by experts and noted to have dual voltage capability. That GM chose to have a 5-15 plug hardwired to the unit vs adaptable plugs like some other dual voltage capable EVSE cords was likely a matter of simplicity and cost.

I get the extra cautious nature of naysayers of the solution. My electrician who did $5K work at my home over the past few months for a kitchen remodel winced when I showed him my rig. In my case, I built an adapter for a backup solution as I need more juice daily than OEM at 240V can supply. But, it is only short by a little, so I could get by with the "hack" for a week or two it might take to make repairs or get replacements for my primary solution.

I get it, the cost of a proper 16A cord is not that steep and may be a better solution for many Bolt owners. But done properly, the OEM cord adapter hack is safe and effective. If one is worried about their own skills to make an adapter, there are a few vendors who sell adapters online. Ford includes a mobile cord with Mach-e, it has a NEMA 5-15 plug, but also comes with a NEMA 14-50 plug that can be swapped and charge the car at 32A. There are also a few dual voltage cords you can find on Amazon. The only difference is these come with the adapters vs having to make your own.

If it is not for you personally, ok. But don't try to make it sound unsafe based on your preferences. It is a good solution for some owners.
 

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There are a lot of 240 volt EVSE that are under $200.00, just FYI.

If you shop around, you might find that it’s not as expensive as you might think. A lot of us don’t have any need for WiFi connectivity or anything especially “smart” on the EVSE, since the car is going to decide to limit you to 32 A, 8 kW and you can set the car to charge off peak.

When you get around to installing a new 240 volt outlet, you might go ahead and install a 50 A circuit, just to cover the bases in the future. Although your Bolt will only pull 32 A, you might end up in the future with a car that could benefit from 40 A pull from a 50 A circuit.

The hard part is running the conduit and wire if you have to cross between floors. The wire and circuit breaker are pretty cheap so you might as well go with 50 A.

Just one dumb old man’s opinion.
 

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m sure you are right about it being able to handle 240v.
No, it is designed to handle it. Clipper Creek doesn't make different EVSEs for different voltages, they make ones that work on multiple voltages and just slap different plugs on them. That is the simplest and cheapest thing to do, so why would you think it's not what they did?

Your comments about a "cheap actual 240v EVSE" betray your ignorance of the EVSE market. The OEM EVSE is built by a respected name in the business (and as mentioned, is an "actual 240v EVSE"). If you feel that a cheap no-name EVSE is better simply because of the plug they put on the end of it, then you're in for quite a shock.
 

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I would strongly advise not doing this. You will have many here tell you it is just fine and that the internal components can handle it, but no one considers the risks. What if something goes wrong and it burns your garage down?
I've got bad news for you. At this point more fires have been caused by Bolt battery issues than by questionable chargers or home wiring. If you're worried about fire risk, you're worrying about the wrong components.
 

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There are two parts of non-compliance going on here. 1) the certification sticker on the brick in the photo makes no mention of 240V, 2) the adapter is not to code.
Logic and enthusiast examination found that the EVSE can do 240V. The adapter is only dangerous if someone tried to use it off the EVSE into the wall looking like a regular 15A receptacle. So zip tie it to the EVSE or put it in an enclosure.
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aside: what would blow in this scenario? The device being plugged in? Or the breaker? Or would heat be generated somewhere to melt/contact/ignite something.
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The only other dangerous part is the receptacle. Follow the electrical code for that and that part is safer.
But it all works electrically.
Some would say an insurer would still cover you if somehow something lit up and it was traced to this. As someone would say, they don't deny a claim because your cigarette was left burning and you fell asleep.
 

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Is this a permanent and satisfactory solution for you, or will you get another EVSE at some point?
It’s a temporary solution for me, my thought of the moment is to buy an inexpensive 16A charger. Will work on a 20A breaker but may go to a 24A charger as I have a 30A circuit avaiable. I like charging at lower currents as it is better for the Bolt (I’ve read) and less stress on wiring and connectors. Bolt is plugged in all the time and it seldom gets below 1/2 charge and most days it’s never below 3/4.
 

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I've got bad news for you. At this point more fires have been caused by Bolt battery issues than by questionable chargers or home wiring. If you're worried about fire risk, you're worrying about the wrong components.
No actually that is exactly my point. If you were to use the stock evse at 240v and then have one of these battery fires, the insurance company could very well use that as reason to deny your claim. Im not saying that that is right that they do that, but insurance companies are commonly sleazy, and will use pretty much anything to get out of paying out a claim. Why give them that opportunity?
 

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@Aeiou : Because risk tolerance levels are up to the individual. This adapter works electrically. Some are fine with the risk. Some aren't. I tend to the not. But I don't judge those that are. I think it's awesome that we learned from others that this will even work. For me, it sits in my back pocket nicely knowing that it's possible.
 

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There are many solutions to choose from depending on your common sense and/or being scared and/or afraid of insurance adjusters. (sarcasm)
1) use the OEM unit on 120V at 12 amp.
2) cut the 120V plug off and install a 230 V plug, plug it into a suitable 230V socket. Now you have a 12 amp 203 V charger at ~2.7-3KW EVSE.
3) make a non-compliant 230V to 120V adapter
4) lock the damned thing into a fireproof metal box
5) buy a dedicated cheap 32 or 40 amp rated 240 EVSE on amazon for $350 ~7.4Kw EVSE
6) buy a dedicated "name brand" 32 or 40 amp rated 240V EVSE for $600+

me? option 3 and 5.
 

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Im sure you are right about it being able to handle 240v. All im saying is why take the risk for something that, for one, doesnt work nearly as well as a cheap actual 240v evse, and also, if anything goes wrong with wiring, even if its not the fault of this unit technically, might result in insurance denying a claim. Why take the risk to save $300 on a $30k car?
If I thought there was any chance of the OEM EVSE causing a fire then I'd think twice about using it. But have have no worries about it. On the grand scale of things that could burn down my house it's way, way down there. I'm way more worried about things like my wife leaving the toaster oven on accidentally (which she's done) or the pilot lights on my gas stove going out. I actually asked my insurance agent about the pilot light thing and he told me that an incident arising from that would be covered.

I actually did go out and buy a separate EVSE - it's a Tesla UMC with multiple AC plugs and a J-Adapter that I keep in the car for emergencies. But I still use the OEM EVSE with 240V power because it's all I need and why would I waste it?
 
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