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I would strongly advise not doing this. You will have many here tell you it is just fine and that the internal components can handle it, but no one considers the risks. What if something goes wrong and it burns your garage down? Even if no life is at risk, and even if the EVSE isn’t technically at fault, if the insurance company finds out you were using 240v on a unit only rated for 120v they will in all likelihood deny your claim and you will have to pay for a new garage (or even just the car itself...) out of pocket. It really is best to spend the few hundred dollars on a decent portable EVSE and be done with it.
If you smoke in bed and fall asleep and burn your house down due to negligence the insurance company still covers you.

If you fuel up your lawn mower in the garage with the engine running, spill gas all over and burn down your house through negligence, the insurance company still covers you.

If you blah blah blah and blah blah blah happens due to negligence the insurance company still covers you.

If you INTENTIONALLY burn down your house, this is called arson, the insurance company does NOT cover you and you face legal penalties.

The stock EVSE being used on 240V is ZERO risk, so it doesn't even fall into this category. If you fail to label the adapter and someone plugs in a 120V device that is the only danger and it can be mitigated with labels and ELIMINATED with locking devices.

I am sick to death of fear mongering and misinformation about this subject.

Keith
 

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There are a lot of 240 volt EVSE that are under $200.00, just FYI.

If you shop around, you might find that it’s not as expensive as you might think. A lot of us don’t have any need for WiFi connectivity or anything especially “smart” on the EVSE, since the car is going to decide to limit you to 32 A, 8 kW and you can set the car to charge off peak.

When you get around to installing a new 240 volt outlet, you might go ahead and install a 50 A circuit, just to cover the bases in the future. Although your Bolt will only pull 32 A, you might end up in the future with a car that could benefit from 40 A pull from a 50 A circuit.

The hard part is running the conduit and wire if you have to cross between floors. The wire and circuit breaker are pretty cheap so you might as well go with 50 A.

Just one dumb old man’s opinion.
I'd like to add to this excellent advice, above ...run all four wires to the outlet (HOT, HOT, NEUTRAL and GROUND). Most 240V EVSEs only use the the two HOTS and GROUND. Your electrician might recommend not running NEUTRAL to save a few bucks, but run it anyway. The incremental cost is minimal, and it will buy you future flexibility. Running the NEUTRAL will allow you to split out a couple of 120V circuits at the EVSE location. (120V requires a HOT and a NEUTRAL.)
 

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Using the portable EVSE at 120VAC probably has many more risks of burning your house down than using it at 240 VAC. Understand that using it at 120 VAC, 12A stress tests your wiring a much higher level than anything else at 120 VAC you're likely to use. I had an experience where there was nearly a fire from using one. Apparently the neutral return to the utility can be in poor condition without the homeowner realizing it. Normally you are using many small 120VAC loads distributed around the house. In that case, the neutral is not carrying much current from the breaker box to the utility. But if you are charging overnight the neutral may have to carry the full 12A. In my case, at a rental house, the return current was going through the TV cable and I didn't realize something was wrong until I lost the internet connection in the morning after the cable connection had been fried. The other danger is the use of the 5-15R socket. These often get a lot of use and abuse, so that's one concern. Often semi-competent homeowners will add or extend a 120VAC branch circuit and I've seen plenty of weird stuff done. And this is just from seeing what was done in houses I've owned.
 
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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
Is this a permanent and satisfactory solution for you, or will you get another EVSE at some point?
this is only a solution until I get a larger circuit wired. I already had a 30 amp circuit wired. I may go with an evse down the road that will get me 24 amps. I put in the plug and put new ends on the extention cord and i am getting 3 kw and moving to 4 sometimes on the dash. it is charging much faster than it was on 110. staying cool. I can get by with 10 miles per hour charge
 

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5) buy a dedicated cheap 32 or 40 amp rated 240 EVSE on amazon for $350 ~7.4Kw EVSE
I wanted 32A so I bought my 240V EVSE for $200 on ebay. Just type '32A EVSE' in the search box. Prices have gone up, lowest I am seeing now is about $250 nowadays.
 

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I wanted 32A so I bought my 240V EVSE for $200 on ebay. Just type '32A EVSE' in the search box. Prices have gone up, lowest I am seeing now is about $250 nowadays.
I opted for the 40 amp hoping it will have a bit better circuitry it if it rated at 40amp. a 32 amp EVSE is running at full throttle at when the bolt allows 32 amp charge. I like to leave a little safety margin and went with 40 amp. comes with wall-mount hardware and has a nice aluminum handle on the cable end. Others here reported no issues with it.
I do frequently use the OEM EVSE on 240 as well, depending on where park my car.
40 amp Level 2 EVSE
 

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No actually that is exactly my point. If you were to use the stock evse at 240v and then have one of these battery fires, the insurance company could very well use that as reason to deny your claim. Im not saying that that is right that they do that, but insurance companies are commonly sleazy, and will use pretty much anything to get out of paying out a claim. Why give them that opportunity?
Insurance regulations are largely up to the states. In most states, if an insurance company wants to deny your claim, the reason for their denial has to be at least part of the cause of the problem. So if you had a battery fire, they would have to show that your modification somehow caused that battery fire in order to make their denial stick.
 

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Insurance regulations are largely up to the states. In most states, if an insurance company wants to deny your claim, the reason for their denial has to be at least part of the cause of the problem. So if you had a battery fire, they would have to show that your modification somehow caused that battery fire in order to make their denial stick.
This is right, the burden would ultimately be on the insurer to demonstrate somehow that an EVSE that is still functional caused a fire when GM has already acknowledged some responsibility. These fires start in the battery compartment, and often take hours to engulf. By then, most of us would be unplugging the cord.

But, it is not wrong to not want to go down the path, it is merely a decision that is up to one's level of risk acceptance.
 

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I've used it with an adapter I bought many times without any issue. When I bought the adaptor from EV doctor, they had me confirm the S/N on the EVSE before selling the adaptor to me.
 

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I have the same factory EVSE and searched to find the same answer to this question. I am about to make an adapter that I can take with me for use in emergency situations. However, looking at the factory EVSE, I see the sticker says nothing about to 240V and want to make sure before I risk damaging this unit. I have a proper Juicebox 40 in my garage, but this is to go in the trunk in case I ever need it.
 

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This is the stock EVSE I have.
I've charged many times with two different units (with the same model #) using my 240V adapter without an issue.

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The stock EVSE being used on 240V is ZERO risk, so it doesn't even fall into this category. If you fail to label the adapter and someone plugs in a 120V device that is the only danger and it can be mitigated with labels and ELIMINATED with locking devices.

I am sick to death of fear mongering and misinformation about this subject.

Keith
Ok. Call me crazy, but I’d rather trust what my electrician, and the vendor of the product, tell me than a bunch of people on the internet. Sorry, no offense meant.
 

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Ok. Call me crazy, but I’d rather trust what my electrician, and the vendor of the product, tell me than a bunch of people on the internet. Sorry, no offense meant.
If you insist. No offense, but you are crazy!

Seriously, an electrician will always take a conservative approach, the label does read 120V after all. And why would they say anything contrary to the label? That would be foolish.

Computers have been shipping with dual voltage capability for probably 20 years, most electronics can use either 120 or 240V because in most of the world, 230-240V is common household standard and it is less costly to make one product with dual voltage capability. My employer has thousands of servers in our data center, and we switched 100% of them from 120V to 240V for two simple reasons, 240V is more efficient (uses less power), and runs cooler (requires less power to run cooling).

Starting with 2016 Volt, the cord has had inner components that are dual voltage capable. Plenty of pictures of the inner components on the internet that demonstrate this. And hundreds of people have done the 240V adapter hack successfully, and safely.

You are not alone is doubting what others are telling you. Nobody would fault you for doubting or being extra cautious. Stay in your comfort zone.

I made an adapter to use as a backup solution, and it works great. 240V at 12A is 2x the charging speed of 120V at 12A. That is enough to recover over 100 miles per day in a typical 10-12 hour overnight charging session. 2.88kW for 10 hours will add about 29 kWh, and at 4 mi/kWh, that works out to roughly 116 miles.
 

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Ok. Call me crazy, but I’d rather trust what my electrician, and the vendor of the product, tell me than a bunch of people on the internet. Sorry, no offense meant.
Call me crazy (and I most certainly am) but being aware of the liability concerns that vendors and electricians have to consider and then doing further research and testing led me to be quite confident in its capability. Further, since the EVSE just passes electricity the only concern is whether its own electronics are dual-voltage, which plugging in once will quickly answer one way or another. It's not the type of thing that would fail over time, it will either be dual voltage and work or it won't be and you'll get a pop and it will be dead.

But nobody is going to force you to try. I've had great luck using it during travel and considering we have zero examples of an OEM EVSE causing damage to a vehicle when operating on 240v but greater-than-zero examples of aftermarket 240v EVSEs causing damage to a vehicle I'd recommend it over a cheap "real" 240v EVSE any day.
 

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Call me crazy (and I most certainly am) but being aware of the liability concerns that vendors and electricians have to consider and then doing further research and testing led me to be quite confident in its capability. Further, since the EVSE just passes electricity the only concern is whether its own electronics are dual-voltage, which plugging in once will quickly answer one way or another. It's not the type of thing that would fail over time, it will either be dual voltage and work or it won't be and you'll get a pop and it will be dead.

But nobody is going to force you to try. I've had great luck using it during travel and considering we have zero examples of an OEM EVSE causing damage to a vehicle when operating on 240v but greater-than-zero examples of aftermarket 240v EVSEs causing damage to a vehicle I'd recommend it over a cheap "real" 240v EVSE any day.
Worst thing I have heard is a guy on Reddit who bought a used Bolt, apparently it was equipped with the old Volt cord that is not dual voltage capable. Probably the [rior owner had an older Volt and swapped cables.

He fried the EVSE, but no damage to car, garage, or anything else.
 

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Call me crazy (and I most certainly am) but being aware of the liability concerns that vendors and electricians have to consider and then doing further research and testing led me to be quite confident in its capability. Further, since the EVSE just passes electricity the only concern is whether its own electronics are dual-voltage, which plugging in once will quickly answer one way or another. It's not the type of thing that would fail over time, it will either be dual voltage and work or it won't be and you'll get a pop and it will be dead.

But nobody is going to force you to try. I've had great luck using it during travel and considering we have zero examples of an OEM EVSE causing damage to a vehicle when operating on 240v but greater-than-zero examples of aftermarket 240v EVSEs causing damage to a vehicle I'd recommend it over a cheap "real" 240v EVSE any day.
To be more specific, the OBC inside the car that actually converts AC to DC is already dual voltage. The EVSE only controls contactor to allow power through the cord and that control board is dual voltage.

If the Op wants to spend money for an EVSE labeled 240V, have at it. It's good for business. :)
 

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I believe it has been mentioned many times that this EVSE is the same that is used in other countries with 230V. The electrical plug would have a molded connector to match the sockets installed in the homes.
Since this is sold in the USA where 120V is standard in homes, and the EVSE comes with a 120V plug, it would be unwise to print on the EVSE that it is 240V capable if it has a 120V plug. It would cause confusion. GM would never advise you to make a 240V to 120V adapter. So owners must use it at their own risk if such adapter is made or used.
I believe that it has been established this EVSE is capable of operating on 240V. Has anyone ever reported one catching on fire?
That's not completely true. For example, just looked at my laptop's power adapter:
100-240V at 2A

The reason a lot of appliances like laptops print "240V" even if they have 120V plugs is because people take them to Europe where 240V is common. The adapters that change US to European plugs don't have any fancy circuitry... they're just connecting the European plug wires to our US plug wires! So some household appliances with 120V US plugs also support 240V even if the plug doesn't match.. probably just because of those simplistic plug adapters that you can buy!

Though to be fair, it's usually printed on the label. And the L1 EVSE doesn't have it printed anywhere (like my laptop's adapter!).

Well, you might say that a laptop's charger cord has an interchangeable plug. OK... how about a portable DVD player? The charging adapter is permanently fixed as US plug but it's rated at: 120-240V 22W 50/60Hz

I guess it's not universal. My alarm clock doesn't have 240V support... nor does my tooth brush charger... nor my iron... nor power drill battery charger.
 

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That's not completely true. For example, just looked at my laptop's power adapter:
100-240V at 2A

The reason a lot of appliances like laptops print "240V" even if they have 120V plugs is because people take them to Europe where 240V is common. The adapters that change US to European plugs don't have any fancy circuitry... they're just connecting the European plug wires to our US plug wires! So some household appliances with 120V US plugs also support 240V even if the plug doesn't match.. probably just because of those simplistic plug adapters that you can buy!

Though to be fair, it's usually printed on the label. And the L1 EVSE doesn't have it printed anywhere (like my laptop's adapter!).

Well, you might say that a laptop's charger cord has an interchangeable plug. OK... how about a portable DVD player? The charging adapter is permanently fixed as US plug but it's rated at: 120-240V 22W 50/60Hz

I guess it's not universal. My alarm clock doesn't have 240V support... nor does my tooth brush charger... nor my iron... nor power drill battery charger.
Server and desktop power supplies have a 3 pin power port (C14 Male). The cord that plugs into the power supply has a 3 Pin Female receptacle that is identical for 120V or 240V (C13 Female) as illustrated below.

240V Cord:
36396
120V cord:
36397


It is actually the power supply that is dual voltage capable, it is auto sensing. Computers generally don't use the full 120V or 240V, so the PS steps down voltage to what the computer requires. Many people think the 240V cord is an extension. It can be used as an extension, but the female C 13 is what 240V power strips use in data centers.

We had thousands of computers running on 120V and moved our data center to a new location with 240V power racks. The only modification was switching which cords we used. The benefit is the watts required to run the computers require less amps (heat is reduced by 50%) at 240V. So, the cooling equipment load is reduced by 50%, resulting in huge power savings.

Most devices that are dual voltage are designed so a single expensive product such as a $5K server can be carried in inventory, and many inexpensive $5 cords can be carried to match destination country power requirements. It is far more cost effective to spend a few extra cents on dual voltage components in the expensive product than to make different expensive products to save a few cents. The logistics and inventory costs eat up the savings in little time.

Same hold true for most electronics these days. The items that are single voltage are typically manufactured for domestic use and the few cent savings is worthwhile.
 

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"an electrician will always take a conservative approach" I'd hope they take the NEC and local building code approach. The codes are there in most cases because of deaths. It's like hearing people who smoke or text will driving. "hasn't killed me .....YET"

I work with electricity and have for 40 years. I've seen some crazy people doing crazy stuff. (and it didn't kill them...yet)

Every year about 400 people get electrocuted and 4000 injured. 5300 fires caused by outlets.
Don't be one and don't let someone you love use those adapters.

Just buy the correct device.
 
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