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"an electrician will always take a conservative approach" I'd hope they take the NEC and local building code approach. The codes are there in most cases because of deaths. It's like hearing people who smoke or text will driving. "hasn't killed me .....YET"

I work with electricity and have for 40 years. I've seen some crazy people doing crazy stuff. (and it didn't kill them...yet)

Every year about 400 people get electrocuted and 4000 injured. 5300 fires caused by outlets.
Don't be one and don't let someone you love use those adapters.

Just buy the correct device.
Huh. So you're saying it's more likely that I'll die because of an electrical issue with my EVSE than because of a fire issue with my Bolt? ;)
 

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No, I didn't say that did I? If you insist then I'd say this.
Statistically it is easy. No person died ...YET ... due to a Bolt fire that I've heard of.
It is statistically accurate that driving your Bolt is the most dangerous.
The safety features was part of the reason I bought it. I didn't test the automatic braking on purpose but had it go off on the highway when car jumped in front of me and slammed on brakes. I was a millisecond behind on pedal.

I understand that the Bolt and my prior i3 was an emerging technology product. I bought CFL's when they first came out. Dadgumit found out they contain mercury. I replaced them even though all working with LED when they came out.
I buy stuff like that.
 

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No, I didn't say that did I? If you insist then I'd say this.
Statistically it is easy. No person died ...YET ... due to a Bolt fire that I've heard of.
It is statistically accurate that driving your Bolt is the most dangerous.
The safety features was part of the reason I bought it. I didn't test the automatic braking on purpose but had it go off on the highway when car jumped in front of me and slammed on brakes. I was a millisecond behind on pedal.

I understand that the Bolt and my prior i3 was an emerging technology product. I bought CFL's when they first came out. Dadgumit found out they contain mercury. I replaced them even though all working with LED when they came out.
I buy stuff like that.
I was joking, hence the winking emoji.
 

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It is a little bit on the funny side when anything electrical comes up, especially EVSE sockets wires connector and such and an electrician gets a hold of that post It is always CODE and NEC or you will die. :) I am exaggerating of course.
We also secretly agreed that "code" is for permitted or inspected work/workers. For the rest of us, NEC is an awesome guide to follow.
I can't recall anyone on this forum damaged a Bolt by using the OEM 120V EVSE with an adapted, connected to 240V.
I am guessing NOONE ever inflated their tires above the recommended (it say on the door sticker) 38PSI... right?
 

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I have looked and looked and what I am seeing is constant disagreements on the validity of using the stock evse on a 240v line. the photo is the back of my unit. I couldn't find any threads telling me if this is one of the ones that is dual voltage usable, although all indications point to being able to use it. power here has been out all day so forgive my frustrations. I have an old water heater line which is 10/2. 30 amp. I already know that this will only deliver 12 amps...no need for debates on that. don't need an adapter as I will go to lowes and get a housing and plug to protect anyone from accidentally plugging in to this. Then, my goal is to change out the end of a custom made extention cord (this is 10/3 wire to plug into this outlet i installed. then, the other end will allow me to plug in the stock evse. the charging rates will more than suit my needs at the moment and theoretically should work. I live alone so no danger of plugging the wrong thing in. I will paint or somehow mark the extention cord on the normal 110v side. My plan is to install a dedicated line that is 40A, just not in a position to do so in the near future. I just want to know if my evse is on that is dual voltage compatible. it appears that it is considering is looks rated to 1440 watts
Those who don't understand electricity freak out when you mention things like that, and the chicken little's come out of the woodwork.
If I thought there was any chance of the OEM EVSE causing a fire then I'd think twice about using it. But have have no worries about it. On the grand scale of things that could burn down my house it's way, way down there. I'm way more worried about things like my wife leaving the toaster oven on accidentally (which she's done) or the pilot lights on my gas stove going out. I actually asked my insurance agent about the pilot light thing and he told me that an incident arising from that would be covered.
I actually did go out and buy a separate EVSE - it's a Tesla UMC with multiple AC plugs and a J-Adapter that I keep in the car for emergencies. But I still use the OEM EVSE with 240V power because it's all I need and why would I waste it?
I'll just say that N. Americans are the only ones using 110-120V for plug in appliances in the entire world.
These chargers are just one of the many things that are dual voltage. They obviously couldn't make it strictly a plug in type of conversion because we just don't have 240V on anything that can take a standard 110 plug by code.
The adapters may be dangerous because they provide the potential for someone to plug a 110V device into what is actually a 240V circuit. It sounds like you have the knowledge to properly wire it in, but i don't think you can just hook it up. It might need to be reconfigured internally, so that what was previously used as a neutral inside the charger, now needs to be connected to L2. I would have to pop the cover to look, but it's really only electricity 101 for someone who understands it.
If my Clipper Creek died, I would convert the supplied charger, as you intend, but I'd hardwire it in.
If you know what you're doing, it's dirt simple to hardwire this charger like any other charger.

View attachment 33428
I have looked and looked and what I am seeing is constant disagreements on the validity of using the stock evse on a 240v line. the photo is the back of my unit. I couldn't find any threads telling me if this is one of the ones that is dual voltage usable, although all indications point to being able to use it. power here has been out all day so forgive my frustrations. I have an old water heater line which is 10/2. 30 amp. I already know that this will only deliver 12 amps...no need for debates on that. don't need an adapter as I will go to lowes and get a housing and plug to protect anyone from accidentally plugging in to this. Then, my goal is to change out the end of a custom made extention cord (this is 10/3 wire to plug into this outlet i installed. then, the other end will allow me to plug in the stock evse. the charging rates will more than suit my needs at the moment and theoretically should work. I live alone so no danger of plugging the wrong thing in. I will paint or somehow mark the extention cord on the normal 110v side. My plan is to install a dedicated line that is 40A, just not in a position to do so in the near future. I just want to know if my evse is on that is dual voltage compatible. it appears that it is considering is looks rated to 1440 watts


View attachment 33428
I'll just say that N. Americans are the only ones using 110-120V for plug in appliances in the entire world.
These chargers are just one of the many things that are dual voltage. They obviously couldn't make it strictly a plug in type of conversion because we just don't have 240V on anything that can take a standard 110 plug by code.
The adapters may be dangerous because they provide the potential for someone to plug a 110V device into what is actually a 240V circuit. It sounds like you have the knowledge to properly wire it in, but i don't think you can just hook it up. It might need to be reconfigured internally, so that what was previously used as a neutral inside the charger, now needs to be connected to L2. I would have to pop the cover to look, but it's really only electricity 101 for someone who understands it.
If my Clipper Creek died, I would convert the supplied charger, as you intend, but I'd hardwire it in.
If you know what you're doing, it's dirt simple to hardwire this charger like any other charger.
 

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Ok. Call me crazy, but I’d rather trust what my electrician, and the vendor of the product, tell me than a bunch of people on the internet. Sorry, no offense meant.
Well, you don't know what you don't know. Your fears are based on your lack of understanding. The only difference between this charger and those sold in Europe are the plugs on the end, possibly one internal connection, and the label.
using it at 240V is "off-label". Welcome to the forum.
That is true, and the only reason a hired electrician can't wire it in for you. More of as formality than a technicality.
 

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It is a little bit on the funny side when anything electrical comes up, especially EVSE sockets wires connector and such and an electrician gets a hold of that post It is always CODE and NEC or you will die. :) I am exaggerating of course.
We also secretly agreed that "code" is for permitted or inspected work/workers. For the rest of us, NEC is an awesome guide to follow.
I can't recall anyone on this forum damaged a Bolt by using the OEM 120V EVSE with an adapted, connected to 240V.
I am guessing NOONE ever inflated their tires above the recommended (it say on the door sticker) 38PSI... right?
I just realized the OP planned to do this 6 months ago. It either burned his house down or it worked the way most people told him it would work, and he didn't let us know. Pretty sure it was the latter.
 

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I just realized the OP planned to do this 6 months ago. It either burned his house down or it worked the way most people told him it would work, and he didn't let us know. Pretty sure it was the latter.
Yeap,....And that is how it works on the internet forums - mostly.
You only come back to complain when something is bad, didn't work, and so on.
When things are good, we are just happy and move on.
 

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I know this thread started a long time ago but it actually has new relevance due to many people needing to charge far away from their house and the OEM charger offers a good alternative.
I do find it humorous that some people recommend getting a cheap no name EVSE from Amazon with no UL listing
as a safer alternative than using the Clipper Creek one we get with the car. The circuit board inside says 240 volts on it. Cutting off the plug ruins the UL listing, do not do it. As someone mentioned, tourists go to Europe all the time
and plug in 120 volt stuff to 240 outlets with adapters they bought at Radio Shack. This is really no different.
You will be adding an extension cord, make sure it is as short as necessary, use only one, and try to make it 12 gauge.
Or get an J1722 extension cord for your L2 charger. Not sure if those are ”legal” either.
Disclosures:
By the way, GM says do not use an extension cord with the OEM in the owner’s manual. Since they are the experts on things catching on fire you should heed their warning.
Nothing I wrote should be construed as actual advice. If you sue me I will sue you right back and my brother is a lawyer. Really.
 

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I don't think you can sue because you read and followed a piece of advice on the internet in a chat forum. I am sure all those would be seen as "use at your own risk".
 

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I don't think you can sue because you read and followed a piece of advice on the internet in a chat forum. I am sure all those would be seen as "use at your own risk".
Really? But I just ordered pack of ivermectin from PetMet because I read it on the internet and I am a sheep. ;)
 

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By the way, GM says do not use an extension cord with the OEM in the owner’s manual. Since they are the experts on things catching on fire you should heed their warning.
It really isn't about things catching on fire. It's really about the fact that many extension cords simply cannot carry the required current. Up to 50 feet a solid 12 gauge heavy duty extension cord would have absolutely no problem carrying the 12A of the OEM EVSE. The problem is that if extension cords were permitted, then someone would try to take a dollar store 16 gauge cord and try to string it across the yard with disastrous results.

ga2500ev
 

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The codes change often for a reason. That reason is never, "I felt like doing it". It is always because of something like electrocution or fire that killed people. On one thread people are worried their car will catch fire. On the next thread people are telling how to create an electrocution or fire issue. Go figure.
 

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The codes change often for a reason. That reason is never, "I felt like doing it". It is always because of something like electrocution or fire that killed people. On one thread people are worried their car will catch fire. On the next thread people are telling how to create an electrocution or fire issue. Go figure.
So where is the page that says there are no safe alternative with charging by extension cord, or any charging what so ever? I want to see a page that says people need to park their Bolts and take the bus. Really, this is what you are saying. Does the guidelines from GM make sense to you…”park your car outside as soon as you are done charging”
What does as soon as mean? In one second, within 5 minutes? How do we really know 89% charge is not infinitely
better than 90%. What if I charge inside to 90% and my car catches on fire while I am putting my shoes on to run and park it outside.
The point is, GM left us with a mess that we have to clean up. The safest answer is to not drive or charge your car.
Another answer is to try to sell it back to GM if you can. Any other answer is an ascending series of risks.
I got to tell you, of all the charging risks using the OEM with a #12 extension cord is about as risk free as I can imagine. If one can’t pull that off safely you probably shouldn’t be driving a car.
 

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I have two 10 gauge extension cords. Main construction use has the 20 amp plug and it isn't maybe 15 feet. The other is a 25 foot with 15A plug. I'd use the 20A all day long to charge at 12A. One would have to be on a 20A outlet.

12 AWG is not a real clue to use. The length and the circuit it is on need to be known. Best would be to look at voltage at load. If it drops 10% then you have an issue. There is a 5% and 10% rule. Monitor current too. If you take the Flir and monitor heat then that would help.
 

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I know this thread started a long time ago but it actually has new relevance due to many people needing to charge far away from their house and the OEM charger offers a good alternative.
I do find it humorous that some people recommend getting a cheap no name EVSE from Amazon with no UL listing
as a safer alternative than using the Clipper Creek one we get with the car. The circuit board inside says 240 volts on it. Cutting off the plug ruins the UL listing, do not do it. As someone mentioned, tourists go to Europe all the time
and plug in 120 volt stuff to 240 outlets with adapters they bought at Radio Shack. This is really no different.
You will be adding an extension cord, make sure it is as short as necessary, use only one, and try to make it 12 gauge.
Or get an J1722 extension cord for your L2 charger. Not sure if those are ”legal” either.
Disclosures:
By the way, GM says do not use an extension cord with the OEM in the owner’s manual. Since they are the experts on things catching on fire you should heed their warning.
Nothing I wrote should be construed as actual advice. If you sue me I will sue you right back and my brother is a lawyer. Really.
Point taken. In my case it would just be used as a home charger. We don't even keep the OEM charger in the car, it's up on a shelf in the garage. In other words, I have no other use for the thing. It would only be used as a home charger if my clipper Creek were to quit.
I understand UL, and even though Canada has nearly identical requirements, at one time UL wasn't legal in Canada till they got together and decided to honor each other's regs. This is strictly a labeling and regulatory formality.
As for the Clipper Creek charger I have, the only difference between the LCS20 and the LCS20P is that one comes with a molded plug, and one doesn't.
If violating a UL label is your concern, you shouldn't plug it into a known 240 source, adapter or not.
All the UL cert does, is state that it met those requirements in it's current form. The exact same charger sold in Canada would say ULc or CSA, so the label would be different, even between the 2 countries.
 

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I see all of these statements "I would not recommend doing this", and in the same breath recommend a cheap EVSE off amazon that has been known to melt and damage the car's charge port.

at least the Stock EVSE has a charge plug that is not going to melt the vehicles charge port.
 

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I don't doubt some connectors get damaged or prone to damage.
Only a few things not made in China.
Never hurts to look at reviews and seek out quality items if possible.

I've had my charger for quite a while. Wish I knew how long it would last.
 
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