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Please do some research about what happens to an EV in the cold before posting a question that has been posted and answered thousands of times on this board already.
 

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And don't start new threads just to talk about old threads. ;)
 
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Those of us wanting mass EV adoption are going to have to deal with these questions for a while. This is brand new for most owners and people selling EVs are often not having an honest conversation with buyers/lessees about their limitations in my opinion.

Even on my local FB EV forum a Tesla owner the other day claimed they lose <10% range in the dead of winter (Minnesota) and a 1% conversion loss on their home level 2 charger.
 

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Please do some research about what happens to an EV in the cold before posting a question that has been posted and answered thousands of times on this board already.
YES!!!!!!!!
 

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Those of us wanting mass EV adoption are going to have to deal with these questions for a while. This is brand new for most owners and people selling EVs are often not having an honest conversation with buyers/lessees about their limitations in my opinion.
The BEV - PHEV are on the roads for almost 10 years already (4 for the Bolt EV, on the 5th year already now). I agree that the people selling them are sometimes more interested in selling than in "having an honest conversation with the buyers" but I can't blame only them. In fact, the blame is more, IMO, on the buyer's side. Who has access to Internet, uses FB/Twitter every day, sometimes more than he/she should for keeping a sane mind, but doesn't have the curiosity to find out how a BEV performs during winter time. The biggest expense a man/woman does in his/her life after buying a house is the car! I hope they do their due diligence and learn about the BEV before they buy one.

The facts are : a BEV sees a range drop during winter time up to 40% of the EPA. Sometimes lower, in really cold temperatures. A BEV behaves like an ICE car during winter. If during summer you use 6L/100 km for a trip, in winter you can see as low as 9 or 10 L/100 km for the same trip. It's simple physics, not the fact that one uses electrons and the other uses gasoline. In fact an ICE is even less performant than a BEV if they have to do short commutes (like 1 to 3 miles) during winter. In these kind of short commutes, the ICE doesn't even heat up enough to be able to provide the warmth needed by the driver.
 

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The BEV - PHEV are on the roads for almost 10 years already (4 for the Bolt EV, on the 5th year already now). I agree that the people selling them are sometimes more interested in selling than in "having an honest conversation with the buyers" but I can't blame only them. In fact, the blame is more, IMO, on the buyer's side. Who has access to Internet, uses FB/Twitter every day, sometimes more than he/she should for keeping a sane mind, but doesn't have the curiosity to find out how a BEV performs during winter time. The biggest expense a man/woman does in his/her life after buying a house is the car! I hope they do their due diligence and learn about the BEV before they buy one.

The facts are : a BEV sees a range drop during winter time up to 40% of the EPA. Sometimes lower, in really cold temperatures. A BEV behaves like an ICE car during winter. If during summer you use 6L/100 km for a trip, in winter you can see as low as 9 or 10 L/100 km for the same trip. It's simple physics, not the fact that one uses electrons and the other uses gasoline. In fact an ICE is even less performant than a BEV if they have to do short commutes (like 1 to 3 miles) during winter. In these kind of short commutes, the ICE doesn't even heat up enough to be able to provide the warmth needed by the driver.
Sure, buyers should do their research about any vehicle. But I also recognize that this forum is a self-selected group of folks who want to talk about and/or learn about EVs. Many things I consider 鈥渃ommon knowledge鈥 are not, much as I am ignorant of others鈥 鈥渃ommon knowledge.鈥 Buyers may not know what they don鈥檛 know. I learned a whole lot AFTER buying a house, too : )

I do take issue with the 鈥淚CE perform worse in winter too鈥 parallel. Yeah, they do, but the scale is not comparable at all. I鈥檝e seen maybe a 10-15% drop in mileage in my ICE cars. Even in my 2006 Prius I went from 44-45 mpg to 38-39 mpg (19.2 L/100 km to 16.7 L/100 km). The percent loss in our Bolt is about 4x that.
 

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I do take issue with the 鈥淚CE perform worse in winter too鈥 parallel. Yeah, they do, but the scale is not comparable at all. I鈥檝e seen maybe a 10-15% drop in mileage in my ICE cars. Even in my 2006 Prius I went from 44-45 mpg to 38-39 mpg (19.2 L/100 km to 16.7 L/100 km). The percent loss in our Bolt is about 4x that.
It all depends what kind of car are we talking about.
You give me the exemple of Prius and from the numbers above I see a 16% difference. I drove my Ford Focus before I went to PHEV then to BEV. The Focus in the summer gave me about 7 L/100 km, while in winter it was more of 8.5-9 L/100 km. That's a difference of about 23% in average. Change my Ford Focus by an Odyssey and the difference will be higher.
I give it to you, it's not 40%, but lets agree also that it's not always 40% in a BEV during all the 3-6 months of winter either. It is up to 40%.

And, you have always a fully charged car every night. And crispy warm every morning (if you are smart enough to preheat it). So if your daily commute is 80 miles, you will always can do it even in the worst winter weather. If you have a commute of 120 miles each day, then you can do it also. All these for a fraction of the cost of gas for your ICE car.
 

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Please do some research about what happens to an EV in the cold before posting a question that has been posted and answered thousands of times on this board already.
While this would be the ideal situation, we must also accept the fact that novices simply do not have the experience necessary to interpret what is posted. All they know is that they were promised 259 miles, it's not showing 259 miles, and therefore their battery must be broken. So, they come here to ask why they have a broken battery.

It literally takes the experience of having an EV for a year and going through the cycle of efficiency changes due to temperature to gain a clear understanding of what's going on.

So, as annoying as it is, and no matter how prominently we post about the adjustment in colder weather, sadly the questions will come each and every winter.

ga2500ev
 

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The definition of a wise person is that one who learns from the mistakes of others. The smart people are those who learn from their mistakes. That鈥檚 why wise persons are very few and the rest are devised in smart and dumb.
 

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I do take issue with the 鈥淚CE perform worse in winter too鈥 parallel. Yeah, they do, but the scale is not comparable at all. I鈥檝e seen maybe a 10-15% drop in mileage in my ICE cars. Even in my 2006 Prius I went from 44-45 mpg to 38-39 mpg (19.2 L/100 km to 16.7 L/100 km). The percent loss in our Bolt is about 4x that.
For 30 years, I commuted just 5 miles to work one way. All my ICEs got atrocious gas mileage on my winter commute in Minnesota. They barely even warmed up by the time I got to work.

I probably wouldn't have done any worse with an EV. And I might actually have been able to have a warm interior before getting to work too.

So it depends.
 

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I think some perspective is in order. If it's just a little cold say 20s to 40s F and range is a concern, then don't mindlessly run the heat unless you need it.

There's some but not much range loss when I'm not using the heater.
 

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Please do some research about what happens to an EV in the cold before posting a question that has been posted and answered thousands of times on this board already.
I have had numerous EVs, but am still surprised at the range loss with the 2017 Bolt I bought 2 months ago. My 2014 Nissan Leaf had about a 20% range decrease, maybe 25% when really cold. My Honda Clarity PHEV about the same. My Hyundai Ioniq Electric seems to do better, around 10-15%.

My Bolt seems to give about 150-160 miles of range in moderately cold conditions. I was not expecting a 35% decline! So to anyone with a Bolt that comes into this forum surprised, it's not that they are uninformed. The main selling point for the Bolt is affordable range. Winter is a huge range killer for the Bolt, even more than other EVs. Here is my 100% charged Bolt this morning. It IS just 10 degrees F.
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I have had numerous EVs, but am still surprised at the range loss with the 2017 Bolt I bought 2 months ago. My 2014 Nissan Leaf had about a 20% range decrease, maybe 25% when really cold. My Honda Clarity PHEV about the same. My Hyundai Ioniq Electric seems to do better, around 10-15%.

My Bolt seems to give about 150-160 miles of range in moderately cold conditions. I was not expecting a 35% decline! So to anyone with a Bolt that comes into this forum surprised, it's not that they are uninformed. The main selling point for the Bolt is affordable range. Winter is a huge range killer for the Bolt, even more than other EVs. Here is my 100% charged Bolt this morning. It IS just 10 degrees F.
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Are you only going by the guess-o-meter estimate? Personally, I track usage based on the percentage bars because the miles can vary considerably depending on climate settings and speed.

In an ICE car, I'll leave the defrost on a tepid setting by default in the winter (not full heat because I get too hot). However, using a tepid setting continuously in the Bolt appears to use a considerable chunk of energy... you can check the pie chart breakdown to see yours. That's why I simply turn mine off if I'm not cold.

Edit:
A better way (than the GOM) is to compare the energy detail breakdown on a cold day vs a warmer day.

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I have had numerous EVs, but am still surprised at the range loss with the 2017 Bolt I bought 2 months ago. My 2014 Nissan Leaf had about a 20% range decrease, maybe 25% when really cold.
I suspect that some of these differences are because people tend to treat the range estimate as gospel and different cars have different algorithms to come up with that number.

For example, I've heard that Tesla vehicles always show the same default range right after charging no matter what the conditions are, so people get the idea that they don't loose much range in the winter, even though they lose roughly the same amount as all the other EVs and it doesn't show up in the range estimate until you've been driving for a bit.

One of the things that the Bolt does is to immediately subtract a good chunk of range as soon as you enable heating and cooling. You can see this sitting in your garage by pushing the "Heat & A/C" button on and off and watching what happens to the range estimate. That makes the Bolt look worse compared to other cars that don't do this, even though those cars will in fact loose range when you run the heat.
 

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As to ICE loss of range in cold weather, an accurate but anecdotal story.

I rented a Ford Explorer in upstate New York in the dead of winter. I aways do a pre-flight check of all controls and systems. I noted the dashboard fuel MPG had never been reset and was showing 17 MPG average, so I reset it. I took off non-stop across the state and when I refilled, it showed a 21 MPG average. "Ah ha, suckers; just shows what a professional can do." After the one long fully warmed run, I had three weeks of near-zero-weather short trips. Each time I did a cold start, I could see the MPG average drop. By the time I returned the car, the average was back down to 17 MPG.

jack vines
 
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