Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

41 - 60 of 79 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
If a stone gets caught between the rotor and pad, it can often be removed by backing up and putting on the brakes. Much faster than removing the wheel and will cause less damage because you don’t need to drive to where you will remove the wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I just swapped one of my Bolt's tires to winters and documented some of the highlights on video.
It's just uploaded a 6 minute video on youtube with minimal editing; sorry folks I'm not a video professional :D
Hope this helps some of you who are confused about the jack points on this vehicle.

My Bolts are equipped with Nokian WRG4 all weather tires but my wife insisted she use proper winter tires during winter time.

https://youtu.be/vHjFHehxmPg

Note: I'm not a professional mechanic so if what I'm doing is wrong, let me know :D
Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
Thanks @Goose for the video! This might be the first of its kind on YouTube. I’ve been scouring the site for instructional videos and came up empty. It appears you’re able to jack up the Bolt without needing an interface to go into the dimpled jack point. But I can certainly see the need for a block of some sort for the rear jack point. Also, great idea on the torque stick!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
I wanted to throw in a THANK YOU for the pictures.

I just made my car less aerodynamic by putting on my Chevy Cruze 16" steel wheel and Hubcaps and my Michelin IceX winter tires today. (… and crossbars and a roofbox for snowboards)

The jacking points held up well for lifting with a two-ton floor jack.

The jack didn't line up with the convex holes, but the plate itself took the weight well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Guys, don't mess around trying to reach those factory lift points, when you can just use the pinch welds! Out of curiosity I tried one of these so-called factory lift spots, it started to deform immediately when my jack made contact with it. Suggesting to use these is bad advice IMO... and runs counter to what is stated in the service manual images posted in this thread.



Unibody construction is your friend and it means something exciting: you can put jacks, jack stands under the rocker panel pinch welds just like the service manual says. Just like you can on pretty much all modern cars. These are designed for lifting the car, and are the easiest, safest place to reach with a jack and stands. I used them and saw only a tiny scuff on the edge where it contacted the jackstand, no deforming, no problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,270 Posts
I prefer using the lifting points that GM uses on the factory floor. They're specifically designed to do the job of lifting the entire car with zero damage, not even little scuff marks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,376 Posts
Guys, don't mess around trying to reach those factory lift points, when you can just use the pinch welds! Out of curiosity I tried one of these so-called factory lift spots, it started to deform immediately when my jack made contact with it. Suggesting to use these is bad advice IMO... and runs counter to what is stated in the service manual images posted in this thread.



Unibody construction is your friend and it means something exciting: you can put jacks, jack stands under the rocker panel pinch welds just like the service manual says. Just like you can on pretty much all modern cars. These are designed for lifting the car, and are the easiest, safest place to reach with a jack and stands. I used them and saw only a tiny scuff on the edge where it contacted the jackstand, no deforming, no problems.
According to GM, both the factory lift points and the rocker panels may be used. I’ve had no issues using either, and the very solid factory lift points did not deform, or show any signs of wear at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Umm sure except I don't have the lift they use at the factory so I go by what the service page says for "service jack" which is what I'm doing. And like I said, the factory lift points *deformed* when my jack (which is a different shape from the factory lift) contacted them. The rocker pinch did not.


To each his own, i just like following the book. and not bending things
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,376 Posts
Umm sure except I don't have the lift they use at the factory so I go by what the service page says for "service jack" which is what I'm doing. And like I said, the factory lift points *deformed* when my jack (which is a different shape from the factory lift) contacted them. The rocker pinch did not.


To each his own, i just like following the book. and not bending things
When using the factory lift points you need to either use a jack that’s designed to fit those jack points, or use a jack pad that will fit. A standard jack designed to lift at the rocker panels won’t work, as you discovered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,620 Posts
And like I said, the factory lift points *deformed* when my jack (which is a different shape from the factory lift) contacted them.
I think most of us who are using the factory lift points are using a jack like the ones made for the Chevy S10 - they have a flat surface with a circular bulge in the middle designed to fit into the lift point's hole so that the jack won't slip horizontally.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
I think most of us who are using the factory lift points are using a jack like the ones made for the Chevy S10 - they have a flat surface with a circular bulge in the middle designed to fit into the lift point's hole so that the jack won't slip horizontally.
I learned from here that there are at least three types of S-10 jacks. Be sure to buy the type in the photo above, with the raised platform with dimple. The other two have shorter (less height) parts with the same dimple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
I just swapped one of my Bolt's tires to winters and documented some of the highlights on video.
It's just uploaded a 6 minute video on youtube with minimal editing; sorry folks I'm not a video professional :D
Hope this helps some of you who are confused about the jack points on this vehicle.

My Bolts are equipped with Nokian WRG4 all weather tires but my wife insisted she use proper winter tires during winter time.

https://youtu.be/vHjFHehxmPg

Note: I'm not a professional mechanic so if what I'm doing is wrong, let me know :D
Cheers!
That was pretty good. I saw one teeny nit picking error, you sid to "Remove the Tire CHOKE" 0:)
I use the same type of 3 ton floor jack, they can be had on sale at Costco for $130, & will jack pretty much everything in the barn.
As you showed, a couple pieces of 2x4 screwed together, (or a scrap of 4x4), make a suitable shim for the back. If you don't want to do that, if you just jack the front a bit higher, it will lift the rear wheel also, & you can do them both.
I used the Re-Learn tool (an orange unit) that was shown on another thread. It didn't work the first 2 times I tried. However, I noticed the red "Low Battery" light flashed a wee bit, even though I had a new battery in it. I swapped for another new Duracell, & noticed the GREEN light was quite a bit brighter. It worked fine after that.
Suggest those who couldn't get their tool to work, try a brand new battery.
One other item I noticed. With the factory wheels, the axle/bearing nut is fully covered by the design of the wheel. This is not the case once you swap to steelies & hubcap.

I once had a Honda rust this area quite badly, I suggest giving the area a squirt of anti rust, such as you would use on the edge of hoods, doors etc.

I see they also use a single screw in the brake rotor, used to hold the rotor in place during assembly. These have a nasty habit of becoming one with the rotor, especially for those who drive in a winter salt environment. I take them out & toss them, now, while it is still easy. They complicate an eventual brake job by a huge factor if you cant get them out. I know, I know, these rotors are not SUPPOSED to rust, but 15 seconds of prevention might save you hours.

If you lease, or don't plan on keeping your Bolt forever, disregard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,440 Posts
I used the Re-Learn tool (an orange unit) that was shown on another thread. It didn't work the first 2 times I tried. However, I noticed the red "Low Battery" light flashed a wee bit, even though I had a new battery in it. I swapped for another new Duracell, & noticed the GREEN light was quite a bit brighter. It worked fine after that.
Suggest those who couldn't get their tool to work, try a brand new battery.


I see they also use a single screw in the brake rotor, used to hold the rotor in place during assembly. These have a nasty habit of becoming one with the rotor, especially for those who drive in a winter salt environment. I take them out & toss them, now, while it is still easy. They complicate an eventual brake job by a huge factor if you cant get them out. I know, I know, these rotors are not SUPPOSED to rust, but 15 seconds of prevention might save you hours.
Two good tips, Thanks. My orange relearn tool worked great, but I understand some others' didn't. The WalMart LED light I put in the charge port door needed the button battery replaced after only a few days. Replaced it with a name brand, and it has worked ever since.

Hope to never need a brake job, but I will pull those screws out the next time I rotate the tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
I see they also use a single screw in the brake rotor, used to hold the rotor in place during assembly. These have a nasty habit of becoming one with the rotor, especially for those who drive in a winter salt environment. I take them out & toss them, now, while it is still easy.
So the referenced screws are not needed? They are just left there but serve no purpose? Or am I missing something?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
So the referenced screws are not needed? They are just left there but serve no purpose? Or am I missing something?
During assembly, they hold the rotor to the hub,(the wheels/tires are installed later), this allows more room to maneuver than if the wheel was put on at this time.
Once the wheels are installed & the lug nuts torqued, that is what holds the rotor in place. They serve no purpose once the wheel nuts are torqued. If you have a garage hoist, they can be seen as a bit of a safety item, as they won't let the rotor fall off on your head if the vehicle is lifted high enough to walk underneath.

Honda uses 2 of these screws on each rotor. I did a brake job on one of our Civics a couple months ago, 165,000km. On one of the rotors, one of the screws wouldn't come out, & when hitting it with an impact driver, it snapped the tip of the driver off, & left it embedded in the phillips head of the screw, (Actually they are not true phillips, they are Japanese Industry Standard JIS, but they look like Phillips).

What should have been a 30 minute job turned into hours. They wouldn't drill out with a cobalt bit, or titanium bit. I ended up borrowing some sort of ceramic bit from my brother,(who is a licensed mechanic & has toolbox worth 6K), that he uses for drilling hardened bolts, such as head bolts on an engine.
Had I followed my own advice, & tossed those screws years ago, I would have saved myself hours of frustration.
If you do have a home hoist, I suggest removing them, & applying some anti seize before replacing them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
They serve no purpose once the wheel nuts are torqued. If you have a garage hoist, they can be seen as a bit of a safety item, as they won't let the rotor fall off on your head if the vehicle is lifted high enough to walk underneath.
OK, thanks. So if the car is ever on a lift for some reason and I have removed these bolts then I might be creating a safety problem for some mechanic in the future. Maybe an anti-sieze compound (Never-seez) will allow the best of both worlds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
What is a common / good - brand/type? (Thanks!)
I don't think it matters, your local NAPA, or AutoZone in the States, or Canadian Tire in Canada will have rattle cans of the stuff. As long as its something that dries to a stiff consistency, so it won't migrate & end up on your rotors or brake pads. Remember, if a dab works, 20 dabs isn't 20 times as good!
A few years ago we picked up a 5 gallon jug of stuff the commercial shops use, & treated several vehicles, but you needed a good compressor & spray gun. It was quite thick once it was exposed to air, & seemed to work well.
A shot from a rattle can each fall should suffice.
The reason I do it is we keep out vehicles til death, usually 15-19 years, & 350K-400K. One Honda rusted the dust cup, literally to dust, & it cost us a front wheel bearing. The rear hubs are easy,(and fairly cheap), to replace, but the front often need to be pressed in, plus involve steering components & a wheel alignment.
Again 10 seconds of prevention...
 
41 - 60 of 79 Posts
About this Discussion
78 Replies
33 Participants
sparks
Chevy Bolt EV Forum
We’re the Largest Chevy Bolt EV Online Community and Owner's Club. Join to discuss sport mode, reviews, battery range and charging!
Full Forum Listing
Top