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My dad was a welder for most of his adult life. You do realize that the huge beams under the highway overpasses you drive on are welded fabrications?
Yeah, I know welds can and are used a great deal in structural components. The aerospace company I worked for specialized in welding. It was a tightly controlled process and depending on the welds, they were dye penetrant, x-ray, ultrasonic or used other methods to 100% inspect the welds. Of course I would trust those welds. Mass produced stuff in China... not so much.




That red one looks like a cold weld which is impossible to detect under a painted surface.

Also, there's often small gaps in the paint around the bumpy welds and corrosion can damage the weld without being seen.

I prefer not to worry about that and go with the cast aluminum jack stands, which is no guarantee either, as casting defects are a real possibility. Hence my pushing a wheel under the car while working under there. Actually, I'll usually put the car on jackstands, have my floor jack still in place, and push the wheel under.

Maybe I'm extra paranoid now because years ago I was careless and almost dropped a VW Passat on top of myself. I had the entire front of the car supported with a pair of half-scissor jacks and got wrapped in what I was doing and climbed underneath and started unbolting the subframe, forgetting to put it on jackstands. The car shifted and I panickied, stopped it, and pushed it back up over the jacks, stopping it from crushing me. I felt like it was one of those adrenaline super-human feats where a person lifts a car up off someone. Never got under a car again without 2 or 3 layers of protection.
 

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Yeah, I know welds can and are used a great deal in structural components. Mass produced stuff in China... not so much.

cast aluminum jack stands, which is no guarantee either, as casting defects are a real possibility.

Never got under a car again without 2 or 3 layers of protection.
Anything produced with lowest cost as job number one will fail....welds, castings, electronics, batteries.

If I get under a car, it is on ramps. Never get under a car that is not on its wheels.
 

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If I get under a car, it is on ramps. Never get under a car that is not on its wheels.
I liked the idea of ramps too, thinking they were safer. Did some research and found out the cheap plastic and cheap metal ones can be worse than jackstands. I found that by the time you spend money on good ramps, it's a lot cheaper to get good stands. And since I'm pretty cheap... Also, need stands for tire rotation anyway.
 

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I liked the idea of ramps too, thinking they were safer.
I have my dad's old oak ramps. They worked for his Dodge pickup, my mom's Hudson opera coupe, their Kaiser and Ramblers, my MGA, my Sentra, and now our Bolt.

They have a built in safety feature. When you are too old to drag them around, it is time to stop working on cars.
 

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Anything produced with lowest cost as job number one will fail....welds, castings, electronics, batteries.

If I get under a car, it is on ramps. Never get under a car that is not on its wheels.
The only time I've ever gotten underneath a car, I drove it up on a curb on 2 wheels. I was a poor college student and didn't have any ramps or stands. After that, I decided I would just let a professional shop handle anything that needed someone to get under the car.
 

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If anybody is using a scissor jack at home you should stop doing that. Those jacks can easily fail when the female threads - that the rod screws through, strip. Scissor jacks should only be used very sparingly, on the road, in emergency situations. You’re pushing your luck if you’re using one routinely at home.
 

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Sooo many cars that have spare tire come with scissor jacks that are rated to lift one corner of the vehicle. I would trust it.
Yes, they’re “rated”, but I’m saying this because I saw one fail right in front of me in my driveway. And ever since that day I will never use a scissor jack - except sparingly, in emergency situation, out on the road. At home, I use a floor jack. Way back when, I didn’t own a floor jack, and thought I could just use the scissor jacks from my multiple cars - after all ... every vehicle was bought brand new, so the jacks were all new.

I found out otherwise.

I learned the same lesson with air compressors. I used to use those small compressors with the cars at home. They burn out. Bought a real compressor and keep the small ones in the car for emergency use only - otherwise you risk failure when you need it most!

Scissor jacks and compact compressors have limited number of uses. Save it for emergency, on-the-Road usage only.

Take a look at that scissor jack: see how that long threaded rod goes through that block? It’s the threads in that block that can fail, instantaneously sending the rod straight through the block, and the car crashing to the ground.
 

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It’s the threads in that block that can fail
Never heard of that, but I suppose it's possible. I have a VW scissor jack that I pulled out of a 1995 Jetta when it got totaled. These jacks are affectionately known as a "widow-maker". Not from the nut failing but from improper alignment during use. It looks like this:

I've used it dozens of times. Possibly over a hundred. Cleaned and greased the threads occasionally. Would I recommend doing this? HEI_I_ NO. This style of jack requires careful positioning and is not designed for repeated use, even though I did so. I just found it easier to do an oil change by using this to lift a corner and slip a jack stand underneath instead of wheeling out the cumbersome floor jack. It also helped with tire rotations since I would use the floor jack on the front and then this jack on the rear just to boost the last few inches.

But is seems like a lot of people use an S10 scissor jack for the Bolt, probably repeatedly, for tire rotations. Maybe not a good idea.

I see that the S10 jack has a raised bump, which I assume is a match for the jack points in the Bolt. I looked for a jack pad with a similar bump so I could use it with my floor jack but I haven't seen any. I don't really like the idea of a hockey puck because it seems like it could slip out of place when one side is raised enough for tire rotations.
 

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When using that jack....if you have three wheels on the ground and you are lifting one corner of the car, this jack should be safe as long as the parking brake is engaged.
 

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My dad was a welder for most of his adult life. You do realize that the huge beams under the highway overpasses you drive on are welded fabrications?
Your dad was a well paid professional, not slave labor in China so I trust his welds a lot more than I trust the welds on a Harbor Freight jack stand.

Also, with a bridge on American roads they are inspected and repaired if they fail inspection... if you maintain a COMPETENTLY welded jack stand (inspect before use, prevent corrosion, replace if damaged) then they are fine... most people are not diligent on these issues.

Keith
 

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Your dad was a well paid professional, not slave labor in China so I trust his welds a lot more than I trust the welds on a Harbor Freight jack stand.
I wouldn't trust anything from Harbor Freight. Thankfully, I am old enough to have a complete collection of tools, and appliances that were built in the US, when it still had FDR era laws.
 

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I am so old, I remember when cars had "bumpers", and jacks that would lift the entire front end of a two ton car by them. Just for fun, I looked up the 1956 Chevy Bel Air to compare to the Bolt.

699K sold that year, compared to 88K US Bolt sales (over 100K globally) to date.

Bel Air/Bolt weight 3,230/3,563 hp 140-325/200 length 197.5/164 width 73.0/69.5 height 59.0/62.8 wheelbase 115.0/102.4 track 58.0f-58.9r/59.1
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 · (Edited)
It is about safety, and saving myself the time of sitting for hours on the road for roadside assistance.

Looking at the numbers, it is more like ~75 pounds, and that isn't all that much, less than 1/2 of most adult persons weight. For changing a tire, I only need one of the jack stands and they jack are the two biggest weights, but the price for two of that type of jack stand was comparable with buying just one.
 

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Back when America was great, we didn't worry about stinkin' safety. The car held the bumper jack upright. :ROFLMAO:

34726
 

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34727

I think @Ronglos was answering your question on the torque setting for the lug nuts - 100 ft. lbs.

I don't see the value of a jack stand in changing a flat tire. After jacking the wheel up; place the spare under that corner if you want extra safety. After pulling the bad wheel off; now put that underneath before taking the spare out.
 
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