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I believe the JuiceBox Pro is still the only charger (besides Tesla) that does load balancing. That's a compelling reason to lean in that direction. Key point though is the JB does it's load sharing via the cloud where the Tesla has a native ability EVSE to EVSE.
 

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Do you think the BATTERY TEMP MANAGEMENT SYSTEM still works properly if you have the juicebox set to stop charging at 75% ?? I do the same thing, stop it at 75%, but my car sits in a hot garage in Phoenix AZ, and I often wonder if the CAR is EVEN ABLE TO RUN BATTERY COOLING because it can't get power, since the charging completely stops...Not sure if it's like a circuit breaker, and cuts power to the car completely.

No I'm pretty sure it does not, if you are using any of the charge management functions of your EVSE (scheduling, charge level) besides controlling the maximum current you will interrupt the car's management.

Basically as soon as your EVSE says that charging is "done" (based on your settings or schedule( the car no longer sees itself as "plugged in" and will revert to extremely passive (doing nothing) thermal management.

You need to set your EVSE to charge all the time and manage what you can through the cars interface.

Also worth noting if you didn't already know this that the JuiceBox (or any non-CCS EVSE) has no way of actually knowing what the car's battery charge level is. It can guess based on what you tell it the capacity is and it's own charging history but this estimate will very quickly become inaccurate and completely goes out the window the minute you charge at a different EVSE. Unfortunately there is no protocol in the J1772 charging standard to allow the car to provide SoC to the EVSE.

Your best bet for keeping your battery cool without keeping it charged to ~90% all the time is to keep your car as cool as possible. I built a carport over my parking space and it made a huge difference in how hot the car got when parked over the weekend (or on days I drive my Mazda3 to work).

It requires work but you can also force a cooling cycle by plugging in, turning the car on and the passenger A/C on. If the battery is above ~31C it will cool the battery to ~27C in 20-30 minutes (sometimes as long as 40 minutes) and once it's cool it will take hours to heat back up again even in an extremely hot environment. This is exactly what I do when I get home from work if the battery is hot. I cool the battery to ~27C and it continues to cool naturally overnight.
 

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No I'm pretty sure it does not, if you are using any of the charge management functions of your EVSE (scheduling, charge level) besides controlling the maximum current you will interrupt the car's management.

Basically as soon as your EVSE says that charging is "done" (based on your settings or schedule( the car no longer sees itself as "plugged in" and will revert to extremely passive (doing nothing) thermal management.

You need to set your EVSE to charge all the time and manage what you can through the cars interface.

Also worth noting if you didn't already know this that the JuiceBox (or any non-CCS EVSE) has no way of actually knowing what the car's battery charge level is. It can guess based on what you tell it the capacity is and it's own charging history but this estimate will very quickly become inaccurate and completely goes out the window the minute you charge at a different EVSE. Unfortunately there is no protocol in the J1772 charging standard to allow the car to provide SoC to the EVSE.

Your best bet for keeping your battery cool without keeping it charged to ~90% all the time is to keep your car as cool as possible. I built a carport over my parking space and it made a huge difference in how hot the car got when parked over the weekend (or on days I drive my Mazda3 to work).

It requires work but you can also force a cooling cycle by plugging in, turning the car on and the passenger A/C on. If the battery is above ~31C it will cool the battery to ~27C in 20-30 minutes (sometimes as long as 40 minutes) and once it's cool it will take hours to heat back up again even in an extremely hot environment. This is exactly what I do when I get home from work if the battery is hot. I cool the battery to ~27C and it continues to cool naturally overnight.
In my experience, the car can still draw electricity after reaching the target level. In my case it was for battery heating or cell balancing (hasn't been hot enough here for cooling yet). The BMS is controlling the activity; the JuiceBox does not go "dead" after the car hits its target..
 

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In my experience, the car can still draw electricity after reaching the target level. In my case it was for battery heating or cell balancing (hasn't been hot enough here for cooling yet). The BMS is controlling the activity; the JuiceBox does not go "dead" after the car hits its target..
I just verified this with cooling as well. The charge completed, adding about 40 kWh. I went out to unplug and found cooling in progress (near 90° outdoor temp) and drawing about 1.6 kW, so I left it plugged in.
 
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