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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Works fine for me
kenJo kindly alerted me to the link problem, and I had fixed it soon after posting. The article has many good points regarding the odds and numbers of fires in various cars, and lists the historical recalls and periodic warnings regarding parking outside. Unfortunately, many public garages are not saying: "Hey, buddy, you can't bring that gasoline-tank-carrying firebomb of a carriage into our garage!"
 

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kenJo kindly alerted me to the link problem, and I had fixed it soon after posting. The article has many good points regarding the odds and numbers of fires in various cars, and lists the historical recalls and periodic warnings regarding parking outside. Unfortunately, many public garages are not saying: "Hey, buddy, you can't bring that gasoline-tank-carrying firebomb of a carriage into our garage!"
One problem we'll never have with our Bolt. Last week, a couple of our extended family went back-country skiing in BC Canada with groups which required leaving their ICEs parked at a trailhead and skinning into the lodges. When they returned a week later, one of those nice, law-abiding Canadians had drilled a hole in each of the plastic gas tanks and stolen all the fuel.

jack vines
 

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One aspect that interests me is the lack of Bolt fires in the last many months. I wonder if the early steps taken including the testing of Bolt batteries during the first recall, the recommendation on not charging to full capacity etc accounts for this change. While the statistical sample of Bolt fires is relatively small, it seems that prior to replacing the batteries, the average Bolt fires behavior has changed. For example, was GM able to spot batteries with high failure probability in the first recall? Just a fun question, since they are so secretive about what they learned.
I am still waiting for a new battery for my early 2017 and keep my Bolt parked outside, in part because it is only a minor inconvenience. Now if I could just figure out why the touch panel in the center screen latches on start up somewhat randomly, now that is a big irritation.
 

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One aspect that interests me is the lack of Bolt fires in the last many months. I wonder if the early steps taken including the testing of Bolt batteries during the first recall, the recommendation on not charging to full capacity etc accounts for this change. While the statistical sample of Bolt fires is relatively small, it seems that prior to replacing the batteries, the average Bolt fires behavior has changed. For example, was GM able to spot batteries with high failure probability in the first recall? Just a fun question, since they are so secretive about what they learned.
One might hypothesize from the same data that there were only a very few batteries manufactured with both the defects and they've already combusted.

jack viens
 

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No, it actually changes everything. They said if you were following GM's guidelines, you could park wherever you please. That 50 foot was a PR disaster and it only lasted about a week before GM abandoned it entirely. You want to remember that one detail? Fine... that's a 'you' problem.
Unfortunately, parking lot operators who remember that one detail create problems for others.
 

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One might hypothesize from the same data that there were only a very few batteries manufactured with both the defects and they've already combusted.

jack viens
GM is not counting cars, they are counting cards like blackjack. I never thought about the finite sample size of defective batteries. It could be most had burned and they found the others about to.
 

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GM is not counting cars, they are counting cards like blackjack. I never thought about the finite sample size of defective batteries. It could be most had burned and they found the others about to.
So, you say that in a blackjack game cards aren't counted ? I assure you, the dealer ALLWAYS counts them.
As for the "finite simple size" that you didn’t thought about, oh well, other EV burnt also (at least one Kona and one Tesla), so why it’s all about GM and not the other too ? Especially when the problem is on the LG batteries, not directly on GM side ?
It's a pity some US GM dealers are idiots and don’t follow the rules they received, because a Bolt EV car is not bringing them money with the very low maintenance it has. But oh well, this is true for 50% of the population, they don’t think ahead, they only see "now". The "now" will bite them in the ass pretty soon, IMO.
 

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One aspect that interests me is the lack of Bolt fires in the last many months. I wonder if the early steps taken including the testing of Bolt batteries during the first recall, the recommendation on not charging to full capacity etc accounts for this change. While the statistical sample of Bolt fires is relatively small, it seems that prior to replacing the batteries, the average Bolt fires behavior has changed. For example, was GM able to spot batteries with high failure probability in the first recall? Just a fun question, since they are so secretive about what they learned.
I am still waiting for a new battery for my early 2017 and keep my Bolt parked outside, in part because it is only a minor inconvenience. Now if I could just figure out why the touch panel in the center screen latches on start up somewhat randomly, now that is a big irritation.
Could it be a seasonal thing? Does the cooler weather impact the possibility of fires? What months had the most and least fires?
 

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Could it be a seasonal thing? Does the cooler weather impact the possibility of fires? What months had the most and least fires?
You are not the first to ask this, and indeed I think the fire occurrences did occur more often in warmer months, but there were exceptions. A sample size of 15 is pretty inconclusive though.

The defects causing shorts which in turn result in fires is unlikely to be climate impacted. Though the expansion and contraction of the cells over time which may have made matters worse, may have been exasperated by warmer temps. The expansion happens ironically when cells go below 30% SOC and as they approach 100% SOC, at least according to one study I have seen, and seems to be heat related.

I had a laptop that experienced a bulging Li Ion pack. My practice was to keep the laptop on 24x7, plugged in and with a screensaver running. It clearly got very warm. I had the laptop sitting flat on a desk, so little heat dissipation. Had I not replaced the battery, a fire would have surely resulted.
 

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Could it be a seasonal thing? Does the cooler weather impact the possibility of fires? What months had the most and least fires?
If you look at the Fire summary table, you'll notice that almost all of the fires occurred between March and November. That might lead one to conclude that there's a seasonal aspect to the risk of fire.

What complicates the question, however, is that the first recall was announced in November of 2020, and owners were instructed at that time to limit charge to 90% or hilltop reserve. Then, the first "final remedy" software update was released in April 2021 where owners with the software "final remedy" presumably could charge to 100% again. The second recall was announced in July 2021, then expanded to all Bolts in August 2021. Again, owners were instructed to limit charge to 90% or hilltop reserve, and avoid driving below 70 miles of range.

So while there might be a seasonal affect on the risk of fire, it's also possible that owners changed their charge / discharge behavior at those times due to the timing of the recall announcements, and the lack of fires in winter is just coincidental to the recall timing / change in owner behavior.

And as @ARob said, we're talking about a small number of events overall, so you can't assume that ~20 rare incidents out of ~150,000 Bolts will be spread evenly across all months. (Here's a fun one: assuming that any particular date of fire is equally possible, what's the probability that 2 fires will occur on the same day if there are 20 fires?)
 

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:rolleyes: here we go, just Another thread to hash out everyone's perspective.
I thought we were done beating the dead horse ... Only for someone else to drag in another dead horse.
 

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I had a laptop that experienced a bulging Li Ion pack. My practice was to keep the laptop on 24x7, plugged in and with a screensaver running. It clearly got very warm. I had the laptop sitting flat on a desk, so little heat dissipation. Had I not replaced the battery, a fire would have surely resulted.
I had the same issue with a cell phone. Since I carry a work issued phone, I left my personal phone on a charging stand at all times. The case eventually bulged out and I had to replace the battery. I've learned that I just leave my personal phone powered off in a drawer, and just take it on on occasion to update the apps and OS. That phone is now 3 years old but virtually unused. Unfortunately, it's going to be outdated by the time I actually need to use it. :D
 

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Car fires are devastating, and all eyes are watching as a handful of EVs go up in flames.

Sep 07, 2021 at 10:20am ET
By: Dave Rea

Over the last few months, we've seen no shortage of coverage of Chevy Bolt fires and recalls by the automotive, tech, and mainstream press. Of course, the Bolt EV / EUV recall is a big deal: it's the first 100% "full-fleet" safety recall of any mass-market EV, and the resulting fires have legitimately catastrophic consequences.

But it's worth asking: is a disproportionate amount of ink being spilled on this recall just because it's EV-related - and therefore new, different, and perhaps a bit scary?

As a Bolt owner, as a dad in a 2-EV household, and as an engineer who works on battery electronics daily, I believe a bigger-picture perspective on the Bolt recall is well-warranted.

Here is an interesting article: Gas vs. Electric Car Fires [2021 Findings]
EVs have less fires than gas or hybrids
 

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We have family that have warned my wife about the dangers of our new Bolt. She's come to me several times and asked questions about it. We sit down, look up the numbers of Bolts made, the number of Bolt fires and see that really small percentage that caught fire.

We look at how many Bolts have caught fire by year of manufacture and see the 2021's aren't having the issues some earlier years have had.

We look at the fact that we don't park in a garage (carport about 12 or 14 feet off to the side of the house.) We also charge it there, under that carport.

We talk about how I've set the max. charge level to 80% (did that back last summer).

We talk about how we don't run the charge level down low (once it seven months it dropped below 20% and was charged up to 70% within a few miles of dropping below the 20% level (our most recent Bolt road trip).

And we talk about some of the other high volume (vs. dangerous) recalls they've had on other vehicles.

The news is not the news. It's not about facts, it's not about truth, it's not about informing the public and letting them make decisions based on reality/facts/truth. It's about money, influence, authority, and control. Has been for years. The president gives a speech that lasts 20 minutes. Then the "news" spends 60 minutes telling you what he said/meant. What he said/meant depends on which network you watch. The truth? The facts? Nope. Not even close. The news these days is only (and still only partially) good for getting the upcoming weather forecasts. Even then they're guessing.
Here's some interesting information on gas cars:
According to a recent FEMA report, “from 2014 to 2016 an estimated 171,500 highway vehicle fires occurred in the United States, resulting in an annual average of 345 deaths; 1,300 injuries; and $1.1 billion in property loss. These highway vehicle fires accounted for 13 percent of fires responded to by fire departments across the nation.”
Am I losing sleep over my 2020 Bolt charging to 100%? **** no! I didn't buy a car to fill the tank to 80% and have no intention of doing so. What if it burns in the garage? That's why I have insurance!!
 
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