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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
which 220V charger do people use? I found several online and would like comments.

Example


Irene
 

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The first two you listed do not max out the capabilities of the Bolt charging system. The Bolt can charge at 32 amps, the first EVSE you listed maxes out at 26 amps (too much power to run off of a dryer outlet, but lower then the max the Bolt can use) and the second one maxes out at 16 amps (can be used on a dryer outlet, but half of what the Bolt can take) but the third one you listed is a match for the Bolts capabilities.

You have to consider how much power you have available in your parking area. Do you already have a 240 V outlet available? If so, how much current is it rated for?

Let us know your requirements and we can give better advice :)

Keith
 

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L2 charging is a much more complex subject than it seems on the surface. Often L2 installations are driven by the yearning need to be able to operate at maximum speed. But satisfying that need often comes at a cost that in the long run may be unnecessary. I always suggest growing charging infrastructure at home in stages.

From the OP's other post, stage one has started: charging at home on 120V. It's a great start because everything is already in place and it cost nothing but the electricity to pull off. I started this way nearly 3 years ago, and on a daily basis, this is where I actually still am.

Fivedoor points out the beginnings of stage two: A 240V outlet. If you have one available, that's great too. As XJ12 points out, the OEM EVSE that comes with the vehicle operates flawlessly at 240V with a simple adapter to the 240V line. They can either be purchased, or if one is handy they are pretty easy to make out of big box hardware store parts. Runs in the $50 ballpark. Doubles the charging speed and requires no new equipment. If stage one is insufficient and you find that you need extra charging time, or faster charging sessions elsewhere on a regular basis, then getting access to a 240V line and trying out the OEM EVSE at 240V is the next step.

Another source of EVSEs is classified sites like Craigslist. I personally scored a 30A Bosch EVSE in nearly new condition from a Model X owner who was moving for $200. After close to a year, I still haven't installed it as I don't have a 240V line yet in my carport. I fashioned an extension cord to the dryer outlet for occasional use. But of course since the dryer is used quite a bit, it isn't a permanent solution.

Stage 3 is purchasing a high powered L2 like the JuiceBox 32/40 new. Personally I'd only skip directly to this step if the local utility was offering a significant rebate on the purchase. Otherwise I'd test both at stage one and stage two to see if either can satisfy most daily charging situations. A Bolt has over 200 miles of range. So it isn't a catastrophic event if it doesn't get a full charge overnight on a daily basis.

My long diatribe is pointing out that rushing out to purchase an L2 may not be the best strategy. Better is to analyze the actual need then put in the infrastructure that supports that need. The OEM EVSE at 240V can recharge at 10 miles/hr. Unless one only sleeps for 4 hours, or has a 100 mile per day commute, often that is enough speed to cover almost any daily situation.

ga2500ev
 

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I'm still researching myself, but my current favorite is Grizzl-e for my outdoor installation. It's a sealed nema 4 enclosure and it seems to be built well.
I like that it's a dumb charger. I don't need or want extra features. The car is smart enough to let me schedule charge times and query charge level remotely.
It's small enough to take on a trip in case I opt to take it along, can be configured to different amp draw levels, and it will support 40a for 'the next EV'.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi Keith, thanks for the comment.
I have the NEMA 14-30 plug at 32A in my garage, the one at 26A would be good.
I will look into the grizzl-e too.
Irene
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Agree, it would be ncie if Chevy provided the 110V and 240V chargers.
 

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If I'm understanding right, the OEM charger can be set to operate at 12 amps, 240 volts, or about 10 mph. Is that right?

The expense of adding a 240 volt line is hard to predict. If you have multiple circuits nearby, they might be on two different legs (or you might be able to make them on two different legs by changing the wires in the main box) and now with led lighting, you might be able to to just move a light circuit wire to another circuit and free things up without running wire from the main box. These things are relatively quick for an electrician to do. Running new wire from the main box is usually labor intensive.
 

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Agree, it would be ncie if Chevy provided the 110V and 240V chargers.
The EVSE operates at 240V with no problems. Like a lot of equipment nowdays, that EVSE is designed to operate all over the world, of which many places are 240V everywhere. Most devices that are dual voltage are usually marked as such. For some reason the EVSE manufacturers declined to do so even though they work just fine at 240V.

It would have been nice if Chevy has added the adapter to 240V too. The problem though is that there are so many 240V plugs/receptacles such as 10-30,6-20,6-30,6-50,14-30,14-50 that the number of required adapters would quickly explode. So I can see why Chevy choose not to include 240V adapters with the equipment.

ga2500ev
 

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Hi Keith, thanks for the comment.
I have the NEMA 14-30 plug at 32A in my garage, the one at 26A would be good.
I will look into the grizzl-e too.
Irene
Your starting point should be to get a 14-30P to 5-15R adapter and use the OEM EVSE.

Also it's unlikely the circuit the 14-30 is attached to is 32A. First off it exceeds the specs of the receptacle. Second is that circuit breakers typically are not 32A. It's more likely a 30A circuit.

Be aware of the 80% rule for continuous loads. When using a device for 3 or more hours, the current must be limited to 80% of the max current of the circuit. Given the likelyhood that it's a 30A circuit, do not connect an EVSE that offers more than 24A to that line.

ga2500ev
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes you are correct, it is 30A, so i cant buy a charger with 26A?
 

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It would have been nice if Chevy has added the adapter to 240V too. The problem though is that there are so many 240V plugs/receptacles such as 10-30,6-20,6-30,6-50,14-30,14-50 that the number of required adapters would quickly explode. So I can see why Chevy choose not to include 240V adapters with the equipment.
Tesla's UMC (Universal Mobile Connector) is brilliant in this regard. It takes interchangeable AC cords, so you can buy only the one(s) you need. When you attach a particular AC cord the charger automatically adjusts its advertised current limit according to the type of plug.

Maybe Tesla has a patent on this idea, because it's so obviously the right way to do it yet nobody else offers one like it.
 

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You
Hi Keith, thanks for the comment.
I have the NEMA 14-30 plug at 32A in my garage, the one at 26A would be good.
I will look into the grizzl-e too.
Irene
You could, but it's close enough to the breaker's capacity that there is increased potential for tripping. To avoid trouble with the breaker, it's recommended to keep the load below 80%. You probably can't use a bigger breaker because that would require that the wire running between the breaker and the plug be #8 copper or bigger and it's probably #10 copper, but you could check that because ultimately it's the size of the wire that limits the size of the charger.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just talked with Juicebox support, it can be programmed to 24A.
 

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You know, dialing back the amperage will also extend the service life of the charger because resistance, and therefore heat production, is proportional to the current. Heat is deadly to electronics, and even to the wiring, because insulator degradation increases with temperature.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Can the Tesla UMC be used on the BOLT?

Tesla's UMC (Universal Mobile Connector) is brilliant in this regard. It takes interchangeable AC cords, so you can buy only the one(s) you need. When you attach a particular AC cord the charger automatically adjusts its advertised current limit according to the type of plug.

Maybe Tesla has a patent on this idea, because it's so obviously the right way to do it yet nobody else offers one like it.
[/QUOTE]
 

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Tesla's UMC (Universal Mobile Connector) is brilliant in this regard. It takes interchangeable AC cords, so you can buy only the one(s) you need. When you attach a particular AC cord the charger automatically adjusts its advertised current limit according to the type of plug.

Maybe Tesla has a patent on this idea, because it's so obviously the right way to do it yet nobody else offers one like it.
Review: rating OEM's EV charging cords (Tesla, Audi get A's; GM, Jaguar fail) - Electrek indicates that the Audi included EVSE has interchangeable plugs, but only 5-15 (120V) and 14-50 (240V) plugs are available.
 

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Can the Tesla UMC be used on the BOLT?
The Tesla EVSE head is different from the SAE J1772 EVSE head that the Bolt accepts. However, there are converters that have a Tesla EVSE socket on one end and an SAE J1772 EVSE head on the other to allow using a Tesla EVSE (L1/L2, not SuperCharger) in a Bolt or other EV with an SAE J1772 socket.

 

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Tesla's UMC (Universal Mobile Connector) is brilliant in this regard. It takes interchangeable AC cords, so you can buy only the one(s) you need. When you attach a particular AC cord the charger automatically adjusts its advertised current limit according to the type of plug.

Maybe Tesla has a patent on this idea, because it's so obviously the right way to do it yet nobody else offers one like it.
There is another company that offers the same product (do not remember the name) and I believe they were sent a cease and desist letter from Tesla.
 
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